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  • KING COUNTY FLOOD

    CONTROL DISTRICT

    ANNUAL REPORT

    Scope of Services 2018 and 2019 First Quarter Performance Report per

    Flood Control District Resolution 2008-17

    April 2019

    A report to the Flood Control

    District’s Board of Supervisors

    highlighting work completed in 2018

    and the first quarter of 2019 in

    support of the District’s mission to

    bring a comprehensive approach to

    floodplain management.

  • This report was produced by the Department of Natural Resources and Parks,

    Water and Land Resources Division

    King Street Center, KSC-NR-0600

    201 South Jackson Street, Suite 600

    Seattle, WA 98104

    www.kingcounty.gov

    Alternate Formats Available

    206-477-4727 TTY Relay: 711

    Above: Cedar River in Early Fall

    Cover photo: Teufel Mitigation Large Wood Project and Riparian Planting

  • 1 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    King County Flood Control District Annual Report April 2019

    Contents

    Scope of Services | 2

    Structural Protection | 5

    Hazard Identification and Mitigation | 8

    Asset Management | 10

    Flood Warning Program | 13

    Consulting to County Agencies | 14

    Risk Reduction Through Partnership | 15

    Attachments | 17-24

    Attachment A – 2018 Budget | 17 Attachment B – 2018 Expenditures | 20

    Attachment C – 2019 Budget | 22

  • 2 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    The Water and Land Resources Division (WLRD) of the Department of Natural Resources and Parks (DNRP) is the service provider to the King County Flood Control District (District). This report provides the District’s Board of Supervisors with the status of work completed in 2018 and the first quarter of 2019 in support of the District’s mission to bring a comprehensive approach to floodplain management.

    Six Service Areas: Reducing Flood Risk through Projects, Programs, and Partnerships

    The District’s work program comprises six product families:

     Structural Protection Reducing flood risks through physical changes to riverine function.

     Hazard Identification and Mitigation Identifying risks and removing people from harm.

     Asset Management Protecting public investments in flood risk reduction facilities and properties.

     Flood Warning Program Distributing information about flood conditions and self-protection methods.

     Consulting to County Agencies Supporting floodplain-related development regulations and public safety work.

     Risk Reduction Through Partnership Supporting regional partners to reduce risk.

    Taken together, these six product families have resulted in a robust floodplain

    management program that works with tribal governments, state agencies, cities, towns,

    residential communities, and other stakeholders to develop projects and policies that

    reduce flood risks throughout our region.

    The Metropolitan King County Council created the Flood Control District in 2007 as a

    special purpose government, providing funding and policy oversight for flood protection

    projects and programs in King County. Since the District’s inception, over 150 capital

    projects such as levee and revetment repairs, major capital construction, and feasibility

    studies have been completed or are in progress on the District’s 6-year capital program.

    Scope of Services A comprehensive approach to floodplain management in King County

  • 3 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    The District’s

    2018 Expenditures

    This pie chart shows

    District expenditures

    for 2018 by the six

    product families

    described on the

    previous page.

    These projects represent an investment of over $760 million in communities and

    neighborhoods across the county. At the same time, the District has worked to raise

    awareness of flood risk and the importance of emergency preparedness, developed

    other programs and policies that help people get out of harm’s way, and partnered with

    tribes, governments, agencies, and stakeholders to leverage funds and take additional

    actions to address flood hazards in our region.

    A Financial Snapshot

    Detailed financial information for 2018 and 2019 is attached at the end of this report.

    What follows here are charts and other information that provide an overview of 2018

    expenditures, the 2019 budget, and the relationship between forecasted expenditures

    and the fund balance over time.

    The District’s 2019 Budget

    Here is a high-level look at the District’s 2019 budget:

     Revised capital program budget: $185.8 million (including $106 million carryover

    from 2018, pending formal adoption by the District). [Product family: Structural

    Protection, Asset Management, and Hazard Identification and Mitigation.]

     $46.5 million is allocated to three grant programs (Subregional Opportunity Fund,

    Cooperative Watershed Management grants, and Flood Reduction grants.

    [Product family: Risk Reduction Through Partnership]).

     $45 million is programmed for projects managed by other jurisdictions, including

    the cities of Kent, Seattle, and Bellevue, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    (USACE). [Product family: Risk Reduction Through Partnership].

    Structural Protection, 39.2%

    Hazard Identification and Mitigation, 10.6%Asset Management,

    15.2%

    Flood Warning Program, 0.7%

    Consulting to County Agencies,

    0.5%

    Risk Reduction Through

    Partnership, 33.7%

  • 4 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    Actual and Forecasted Flood District Expenditures by Type

    The chart below provides a look at actual and forecasted expenditures (represented by

    bars and grouped by year) over time and the relationship between those expenditures

    and the District’s fund balance (represented by the pink curve). The break in the fund

    balance represents the expected increase in productivity resulting from additional staff

    authorized by the District in 2017. The chart shows that current forecast expenditures

    will result in a negative fund balance by 2022. All forecasted expenditures are based on

    key assumptions, such as the timely completion of the Lower Russell Levee Setback

    Project and the Pacific Right Bank Flood Protection Project, two of the District’s largest

    upcoming projects. Risks to project schedules can be found in the District’s 2019

    Capital Budget book.

  • 5 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    Structural protection products reduce flood risks through built projects that physically

    change or intervene in river processes and functions. These projects are intended to

    prevent, control, or reduce flooding inundation or channel migration hazards, and

    associated flood risks to people and the built environment.

    SNOQUALMIE RIVER BASIN

    Tolt Pipeline Protection Project: Protecting Regional Water Supply

    The largest construction project of 2018

    was the $10.8 million Tolt Pipeline

    Protection Project. The Tolt Pipeline, two

    parallel pipes that run from the Tolt

    Reservoir to the City of Seattle, provides

    nearly a third of the region’s water supplies

    for more than one million residents in

    Seattle, Bellevue, Redmond, Issaquah,

    Bothell, Kirkland, the Sammamish Plateau,

    Woodinville, Northshore, Lake Forest Park,

    and Duvall. One section of the pipeline,

    along the lower Snoqualmie River, was at

    serious risk. About 1,200 feet of the

    revetment failed and was completely gone,

    leading to lateral channel migration that

    threatened the pipeline.

    In addition to reconstruction of the failed revetment protecting the pipeline, required

    habitat mitigation included creation of a large off-channel alcove, realignment of a

    tributary creek, and riparian plantings of several acres along the river and creek banks.

    A new 10 foot-by-10 foot concrete box culvert

    equipped with a flood gate now provides

    improved flood protection, drainage for nearby

    farms, and fish passage. The project was

    completed in the fall of 2018.

    Structural Protection Reducing flood risks through physical changes to riverine function

    Tolt Pipeline Protection Project under construction on the Lower Snoqualmie River

    (pipeline is visible on the right side of the photo)

    700 ballasted wood jacks were placed in the Lower Snoqualmie

    River to protect the river bank and the Tolt Pipeline

  • 6 | King County Flood Control District 2018 Annual Report

    WHITE RIVER BASIN

    The Pacific Right Bank Flood Protection Project: Planning for a Flood Risk- Reduction Project

    The Pacific Right Bank Project, a companion to the Countyline Levee Setback Project completed in 2017, is