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  • ___________________________________________________________________________

    2012/EPWG/SDMOF/002 Session 1

    Lesson Learned from Major Disasters in Indonesia

    Purpose: Information Submitted by: Indonesia

    6th Senior Disaster Management Officials Forum

    Vladivostok, Russia 9-10 October 2012

  • NATIONAL AGENCY FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT (BNPB)

    MAJOR DISASTERS IN INDONESIAMAJOR DISASTERS IN INDONESIA

  • Date : Sunday, December 26th 2004 Earthquake Time : 07 58 48.38 Western

    Indonesian Time Epicentrum : 2.9 longitude – 95.6 BT In the

    depth of : 20 km under water 149 km south of Meulaboh

    Scale : 8,9 SR

    EARTH QUAKE & TSUNAMI IN ACEH

    Impact •The stagnation of Provincial and district/Municipal Governments •Casualties : dies > 128.803 people

    missing > 37.066 people displacement > 556.638 people

    •The stagnation of social and economic activities •People were panic, worried and stressed (psychological trouble) •The damage and destroy of infrastructure

    • Occurrence –5,9 RS, May 27, 2006 at 5.58 West Time Zone

    • Casualties –Died 5.773 people –Displacement 2.165.488 people

    • Damage –Heavy damage of house 129.799 unit –Slightly damage of house 172.854 unit –School 1.109 unit, Place of piety 1.674 unit –Government office 1.302 unit and other public

    facilities

    EARTH QUAKE IN JOGJAKARTA & CENTRAL JAVA

  • EARTHQUAKE WEST SUMATERAEARTHQUAKE WEST SUMATERA September 31, 2009

    CASUALTIES 1.195 dies, 2 missing , 1.798 Injured DAMAGES House 271.540 units, Education Facility 4.625 units,

    Religious Facility 2.488 units, Medical Facility 395 units, Governmental Facility 423 units, Road 285 internodes, Bridge 61 units

    DETAILS 7.9 SR (14:55 WIB) depth 30 Km, epicentrum 8.24 LS – 107.32 BT

    HANDLING Deliver Rapid Assessment Team and give

    assistance to local Government to establish Command Post, coordinating with local, national and international stake holder.

    ACCIDENT : Earthquake 7.2 RS and Tsunami DATE, TIME : Monday, Oct 25 2010 21.42 WIB EPICENTRUM : 78 Km South‐West of Pagai Selatan ‐

    Mentawai DEPTH : 10 Km POTENTIAL HAZARD  : Tsunami (12 m height, 600 m far from 

    shoreline) MMI : VI‐VII Pagai Selatan, III ‐ IV Padang, III ‐

    IV Pariaman, III Sungai Penuh, III  Bengkulu, II Kepahiang, II ‐ III Ketahun

    HANDLING : people evacuation, medical treatment,  basic needs fulfillment,  shelters/barracks development,  infrastructures recovery, On‐Call  budget

    CONSTRAINT : An island, high waves on the strait

  • DATE : Monday, Oct 25, 2010 AFFECTED AREAS : Yogyakarta Province (Sleman 

    Distric) dan Central Jawa (Klaten,  Magelang, Boyolali and  Temanggung)

    STATUS : “BEWARE” Level IV (Oct 25 2010 to  Dec 03 2010)

    CASUALTIES : 322 dies, 427 treated, 136.585  evacuated

    DAMAGES : 3.099 houses, 217 schools, 7  markets, 15 health facilities, etc

    HANDLING : people evacuation, medical  treatment, basic needs fulfillment,  shelters/barracks development,  infrastructures recovery, On‐Call  budget

    FUTHER HANDLING: mud flood anticipation

    TIME : 2006 – 2012 AFFECTED AREAS  : Sumatera (Jambi, Riau, South 

    Sumatera) and Kalimantan/Borneo  IMPACTS : Haze pollution (cross country), 

    respiratory infections, flight disorder RELIEF  MEASURES : medical treatment, prevention, fire 

    extinguishing by land (fire fighter)  and air (water bombing), weather  modification technology, On‐Call  budget

  • Hotspot accumulation 1998 - 2010

    Indonesia encounters Land and Forest FiresIndonesia encounters Land and Forest Fires

    Haze spreading in 1997

    THE PROFILE OF INDONESIATHE PROFILE OF INDONESIA

  • Facts and problem encountered :

    1. Much of the economy is highly vulnerable to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    2. High rainfall in the west and dry zones in the east are subject to recurring floods and droughts

    3. Deforestation and prolonged drought intensity and increase the occurrence of forest fires

    Disaster events increased significantly. 70% hydro‐meteorological disasters Trend disasters will increase in future with increasing global climate  change and environmental degradation.

    82 122

    190

    896 692

    888

    1302

    1835

    533

    814

    744

  • The increasing frequency of disasters burdens public finance and the economy : 1. 2004 Aceh/Nias Tsunami : US $ 4.5 billion 2. 2006 Yogyakarta Earthquake : US $ 3.5 billion 3. 2009 Sumatra Earthquake : US $ 3.0 billion 4. 2010 Mt. Merapi Eruption : US $ 3.2 billion 5. 2010 Mentawai Tsunami : US $ 1.5 billion 6. 2010 West Papua Landslides : US $ 0.2 billion

    7. Small7. Small––Medium Scale Disasters up to 2012 : US $ 1.3 billionMedium Scale Disasters up to 2012 : US $ 1.3 billion

    CHALLENGES AHEAD

    1. Population growth and urbanization increase vulnerabilities

    2. Weak zoning enforcement and poorly maintained infrastructure contribute to the problem

    3. More frequent events + increased exposure + lower coping capacity = Higher Impacts

    4. Climate Change Factor increase the level of risks

  • POLICY AND IMPLEMENTATIONPOLICY AND IMPLEMENTATION

    10/11/2012

    DISASTER MANAGEMENT & POLICY

    3. ESTABLISH LDMO IN 33 P & 491 D

    4. IMPLEMENTATION OF PREVENTION & MITIGATION PLAN ACCORDING TO HFA

    6. INCREASE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RECOVERY PROGRAM

    7. TO PURSUE COMMUNITY RESILIENCY

    8. INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIONS

    9. UTILIZATION OF MILITARY ASSETS FOR DISASTER RELIEF

    1. DISASTER MANAGEMENT LAW

    5. ENHANCEMENT OF CAPACITY FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    2. ESTABLISH 5 YEAR DM PLAN

    LDMO = Local Disaster Management Office

  • ESTABLISHEMENT  LDMO (BPBD) IN PROVINCE AND DISTRIC LEVEL • 33 P AND 435 D  OF 33 P AND 491 D • BPBD UNDER GOVERNOR  OR MAYOR JURISDICTION • MOST BPBD OPERASIONAL COST S ARE SUPPORTED 

    BY NATIONAL  BUDGET • BPBD Coordinate all agencies involved in DM activities  • BPBD should be the first responder when disaster 

    occurs and  BNPB supports BPBD with Emergency   Response Fund

    • BNPB should strengthen the  capacity  of BPBD  personnel's & equipments through regular trainings  on prevention, mitigation, response and recovery. 

    • International Cooperation's in capacity building BPBD  are conducted with UN System, International NGO  as  well as invitation for oversees training offered by  other governments

    Organization Framework of BNPB  and  BPBD

    18

    PRESIDENT RI

    Ministries/  Departments

    GOVERNOR

    BNPB

    Non Departments  Institution

    BUPATI/MAYOR

    BPBD

    Agencies

    CAMAT

    BPBD

    Agencies 

    Head of Village

    COMMUNITY

    National 1

    Provincial 33

    District/Municipal 491 (401)

    Sub District

    Village

  • Implementation of Prevention and Mitigation

    • The Implementation of  Hyogo Framework  5  Priorities for Action on  DRR has attained  substansial achievement

    • Develop Public Private  Partnership in Disaster  Relief and Recovery  Process

    • Develop Early Warning  System for Tsunami, Land‐ Slide, Volcanic Eruption,   Flood and Forest Fires that  all are linked to EOC’s

    ENHANCHMENT THE CAPACITY  for EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    • Capacity Building for Joint‐Rapid Assessment Teams (JRAT) • Capacity Building for Rapid Response Unit (RRU) , most of the 

    members are stem from Military Personnel's by assignment .  There are 2 Units ready for action  located in Jakarta and  Malang.  They are only be deployed for major disasters.

    • Provide mobile satellite base real‐time devices for JRAT and  RRU when deploying to affected areas..

    • Support JRAT & RRU with Emergency Heli‐borne Photo  System

    • Conduct Exercise for Disaster Relief at local, national and  international level with the involvement of military assets.

    • Implement Clustering  on ICS System  • Develop Sattelite‐Based Emergency Operation Center (EOC’s) 

    in National & District Levels.

  • Increase the Effectiveness  of Recovery Program Shift attention to Immidiate Early  Recovery Measures Assessment for Recovery is  conducted during  Disaster Relief  Phase Use Emergency Response Fund for  Early Recovery Program, especially  for housing and access roads. Recovery are synchronized and  conducted by all sectors from  National and International,  including participation and donation  b P i t S t d

    10/11/2012

    PURSUE COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

    1. Community Base Self‐Help/Rescue Groups

    2. Community Leaders Risk Education

    3. Religious Center Based Shelter Development

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