Linked Lists Linked Lists Representation Traversing a Linked List Searching in a Linked List Insertion and Deletion in a Linked List Header Linked Lists

  • Published on
    30-Mar-2015

  • View
    223

  • Download
    6

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Slide 1

Linked Lists Linked Lists Representation Traversing a Linked List Searching in a Linked List Insertion and Deletion in a Linked List Header Linked Lists Two Way Lists Slide 2 Introduction It consists of a sequence of nodes, each containing arbitrary data field and one or two reference (links) pointing to the next and/or previous nodes. Linked List consist of nodes. A node, the building block of a linked list, contains two parts: A data element representing the information in the current position of the list. A pointer/link/address to the next node in the list The START pointer points to the first node of the list. The last node of Linked List has its Link portion null indicating end of Linked List No node in Linked List has its data portion empty Slide 3 Introduction Cont. StartDataLink 14810 Representation in Memory It requires two linear arrays as INFO and LINK Start InfoLink 123456123456 5 2 4 0 A H G Example 5.3, 5.4,5.5 Slide 4 Arrays and Linked Lists An array is a list store in contiguous memory. Any element of an array can be accessed quickly. Insertion and deletion in the middle of an array requires the movement of many elements. The size of an array is fixed. A linked list is a list scattered throughout memory and connected with pointers/Links of next element. The elements of a linked list must be accessed in order. Linear Access Mechanism Insertion and deletion only requires re-assignment of a few pointers. The length of the list can change at any time, making it a dynamic data structure. Slide 5 Traversing a Linked List StartDataLink 14810 PTR PTR:= LINK [PTR] 1. Set PTR := START 2. Repeat Steps 3-4 while PTR NULL 3. Apply process to INFO[PTR] 4. Set PTR:= LINK[PTR] [end of loop] 5. Exit Slide 6 LIST => Link List, LOC => ITEM Location or LOC => NULL Searching in a Linked List Search (LINK, START, ITEM, LOC) 1. Set PTR := START, LOC:= NULL 2. Repeat Steps 3-4 while PTR NULL 3. If INFO[PTR] = ITEM Set LOC:=PTR [end of If Structure] 4. Set PTR:= LINK[PTR] 5. [end of loop] 6. Return LOC Slide 7 Insertion in a Linked List 1. Create a new Node and store data in that node. 2. Find the correct position in the list. 3. Assign the pointers to include the new node. Algorithm: InsertFirst(START, ITEM) 1.Set New:= Create Node() 2.Set INFO [New] := ITEM and LINK [New] := NULL 3.Set START := New 4.Exit Slide 8 Insertion in a Linked List 1. Create a new Node and store data in that node. 2. Find the correct position in the list. 3. Assign the pointers to include the new node. Algorithm: InsertAtLoc( START, LOC, ITEM) 1.If LOC=NULL then 2.InsertFirst (START, ITEM) 3.Else 4.Set New:= Create Node() 5.Set INFO [New] := ITEM and LINK [New] := NULL 6.Set LINK [NEW] := LINK [LOC] 7.Set LINK [LOC] := New [End of if Structure] 8.Exit Slide 9 Insertion In Sorted Linked List Steps: 1.Find the Location of the node 2.Use Insertion method to insert into the Linked List 1. Find the Location of the node: 1.Search the Item after which insertion needs to be made. 2.As the Linked List is sorted searching will result in the location of element => Given ITEM 3.As Insertion can not be made before a Node therefore another pointer will keep track of the previous node i.e. before moving the PTR, Save := PTR 4.PTR points to current node Element which is => ITEM while SAVE points to Element before PTR. 5.Insertion will be made after SAVE Slide 10 Algorithm: FindLoc (START,ITEM,LOC) 1.If START = NULL, then Set LOC := NULL and Return 2.Else if ITEM < INFO [START] [ITEM is not in List] Set LOC := NULL and Return [ End of if ] 3.Set SAVE := START and PTR := LINK [ START ] 4.Repeat Steps 3 - 4 while PTR NULL 5.If ITEM < INFO [ PTR ] then Set LOC := SAVE and Return 6.Else Set SAVE := PTR and PTR := LINK [ PTR ] [ End of if ] [ End of Step 4 loop ] 7.Set LOC := PTR and Return Find Location in a Sorted Linked List Slide 11 Algorithm: FindAndInsert (START, ITEM) 1.LOC:= FindLoc (START,ITEM,LOC) 2.Call InsetAtLoc (Start, ITEM,LOC) 3.Exit Slide 12 Header Linked Lists A Header Linked List always Contains a Special Node called Header Node It has Two Types: a) Grounded Header List Last Node Contains the NULL Pointer b) Circular Header List Last Node Points Back to the Header Node Slide 13 Graphical Representations StartDataLink 4810 Grounded Header Link List Header Node StartDataLink 4810 Circular Header Link List Header Node LINK [START] = NULL LINK [START] = START Slide 14 Header Linked Lists One way to simplify insertion and deletion is never to insert an item before the first or after the last item and never to delete the first node You can set a header node at the beginning of the list containing a value smaller than the smallest value in the data set You can set a trailer node at the end of the list containing a value larger than the largest value in the data set. These two nodes, header and trailer, serve merely to simplify the insertion and deletion algorithms and are not part of the actual list. The actual list is between these two nodes. Slide 15 Doubly Linked Lists A Doubly Linked List is List in which every Node has a Next Pointer and a Back Pointer Every Node (Except the Last Node) Contains the Address of the Next Node, and Every Node (Except the First Node) Contains the Address of the Previous Node. A Doubly Linked List can be Traversed in Either Direction Slide 16 Definition and Graphical Representations Start 4 The Node is Divided into 3 parts 1) Information Field 2) Forward Link which Points to the Next Node 3) Backward Link which Points to the Previous Node The starting Address or the Address of First Node is Stored in START / FIRST Pointer Another Pointer can be used to traverse Doubly LL from End. This Pointer is Called END or LAST X210 Last INFO Field BACK Pointer FORE Pointer Slide 17 Reading Assignments Complexity in Traversing a Linked List Complexity in Searching a Linked List Complexity in Sorted Linked List Garbage Collection in Linked List Overflow and Underflow in Linked Lists Complexities of Insertion in a Linked List

Recommended

View more >