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1162 peutic exercises would effect cure. This, in its turn, will, I venture to submit, die out at the end of this closing decade, its death being probably assisted by the blow of some other widely different novelty. In the meantime, while these by-treatments have their run, the one which solves what Dr. Fleming justly designates the mechanical problem must continue to keep its even hold and ground, because it is soundly based ; and careful workers with fresh ’experiences will be found steadily treading in the footsteps of Tamplin, of Bro(lhurst, and of Adarns. Personally, I might be considered a not impartial advocate of mechanical methods. On the contrary, I have conscientiously and immediately tried new procedures in some selected cases to see if by hazard the test of practice might possibly upset the forecast of theory, and have not found that this has proved possible; and f believe that spinal curvature, being a mechanical failing, can only be successfully met by appropriate mechanical remedies, and my experiences coincide with Dr. Fleming’s. I am, Sirs, yours truly, Wimpole-street, May 4th, 1839. HEATHER BIGG. LIVERPOOL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Mr. Justice Stephen on Obscene Literature. ALLUDING to a case in the calendar at the recent Assizes, his lordship observed: "A charge against a man named Charles Albert Longest would require some observa- tions from him. Longest was indicted on a charge of having published and issued books of an ob-cene character, thereby contaminating and corrupting the morals of the people. A considerable number of the books were found in the man’s possession, and they were of a kind setting forth subjects of a very disgusting nature. Every medical man of common decency or reputation would regard it as scandalous and an imputation upon him that he had anything to do with such disgraceful books. No doubt a book of that kind was calculated to offend any person of good taste or good morals, or, in fact, any decent person. But the man was not indicted for the mere issue of the books-he was charged with procuring them for the purpose of unlawfully and wickedly uttering, publishing, selling, and disseminating the books amongst the subjects of Her Majesty the Queen, thereby contaminating and corrupting their morals. It was the duty of grand juries, in case they saw any particular work which they thought likely to injure morals, especially by obscenity, to accuse the persons who committed that crime. There was no doubt it was a crime. The last time he sat in that hall he punished severely three men who were guilty of publishing grossly offensive photographs. But a medical book was a different thing to a photograph. When a person dealt with disease, however ignorantly or however disgusting might be the subject, he was doing a thing which the best and wisest of men might do under other circumstances. A man might devote his life to the study of certain subjects, and if he honestly printed an account of what he had to say, he did not think lie ought to be indicted for it. If in this case the grand jury found these books were published merely to advertise his business and to get custom, he did not think they should find a true bill; but if they considered that that was a pretence, that there was no medical object in view, and that the idea was simply to corrupt the minds of the public, then they would return a true bill. Death of Mr. E. H. Allen. Mr. E. H. Allen, resident medical officer to the Netherneld- road Hospital for Infectious Diseases, died on May 28th, under unusually sad circumstances. He was in his usual health up to the evening of Friday, the 24th, when he left a musical entertainment to return to the hospital, not feeling well. It was soon apparent that he was suffering from an attack of scarlatina maligna, and in spite of every care and attention he sank, expiring on Tuesday evening. The deceased was in his thirty-seventh year, and had resided in Liverpool some years, having, previously to the appoint- ment he held at the time of his death, filled the posts of assistant resident surgeon at the North and senior house surgeon at the East Dispensary. His funeral, which took place last Saturday, was attended by a large number of medical and lay friends, and on Sunday the Rev. Canon Taylor of St. Chrysostom’s Church, in his morning sermon, made a feeling allusion to his death. Severe Thunderstorm. This city and its neighbourhood were on Sunday visited by one of the severest thunderstorms ever experienced, which was followed by a hailstorm. The torrents of rain flooded parts of the city, the grids becoming choked. Some damage was done to property, but fortunately no fatality occurred. Handsome Gift to the Bootle, Hospital. The Bootle Hospital has been supplied with a horse’ ambulance through the generosity of Mr. W. A. Matheson, a leading local resident, who formally presented it to the hospital on the 31st ult. In doing so, he mentioned Alder- man Webster as being the first to suggest the ambulance to, him and Mr. Wills, F. R. C. S. 1., through whose influence the- corporation of Bootle had been induced to take charge of the ambulance at the fire station, and to provide a horse for it when required. A Victim to Educational Over-pressure. Mr. Husband, deputy coroner for the West Derby dis- trict, held an inquest last week upon the body of a girl which had been recovered from a pit at Ditton, two days. after the deceased had been first missed. Her sister stated, that she had been teaching in a school up to Monday last. She had never previously complained about anything, but had been much troubled as to whether she would pass. a scholarship examination for which she was studying. She said, " I think I will go mad when I begin to think." The deceased was in the habit of studying all day long, with the exception of about an hour. She left school looking much troubled. The deputy coroner said it was a strange thing that children should be subjected to such examina- tions and then kept in suspense for so long a time. The jury returned an open verdict, expressing great sympathy- with the parents of the deceased. Improved Arrangements for removing Patients with infectious Disease. III Forms of notice have been issued from the medical officer of health to medical practitioners, clergymen, emigration agents, lodging-house keepers and others. When it is thought desirable that a person suffering from an infectious disease should be sent to a hospital, application accompanied by a medical certificate must be made to the medical officer of health for an ambulance carriage. This will be sent to the patient’s residence and will convey him free of any charge to. the hospital appropriated for the treatment of his particular disease. Should the case be very urgent, the patient may be sent direct, if suffering from small-pox, to the ParkhilL Hospital ; if from typhus, scarlatina, or diphtheria, to that of Graf ton-street; from typhoid or scarlatina, to the Nether- field-road Hospital; and from measles, to the Workhouse Hospital, Brownlow-hill. Any carriage or other vehicle used for the conveyance of a patient suffering from an’ infectious disease must be taken to the disinfecting estab- lishment, Ford-street, Vauxhall-road, where it will be dis- infected without any charge. With such admirable arrange- ments as these in force and fully utilised, it ought to be impossible for any infectious disease to assume epidemic proportions. Stanley Hospital Bazaar and Fancy Fair. To relieve the Stanley Hospital from a burdensome debt, a bazaar and fancy fair on a very magnificent scale is to be held in Stanley Park during next week, under most dis- tinguished and influential patronage. It is hoped that a sufficient sum will be raised, not only to pay on’ the debt. on the building fund, but also to justify the committee in opening the whole of the hospital to the public, placing at their disposal the whole number of available beds, only a proportion of which are now used for want of funds. Liverpool, June 5th. BOARDING-OUT PAUPER CHILDREN.-The Bishop. of Chichester, presiding last week at the annual meeting of the Association for the Advancement of Boarding-out Pauper Children, said they preferred to treat pauper children on the parental system, discarding all official institutions whatsoever. This Association fostered the idea of independence and self-reliance, and relieved the community of the burden of useh s, and unprofitable members, and assisted those who could not help themselves.

LIVERPOOL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

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1162

peutic exercises would effect cure. This, in its turn, will,I venture to submit, die out at the end of this closingdecade, its death being probably assisted by the blow ofsome other widely different novelty. In the meantime,while these by-treatments have their run, the one whichsolves what Dr. Fleming justly designates the mechanicalproblem must continue to keep its even hold and ground,because it is soundly based ; and careful workers with fresh’experiences will be found steadily treading in the footstepsof Tamplin, of Bro(lhurst, and of Adarns. Personally, Imight be considered a not impartial advocate of mechanicalmethods. On the contrary, I have conscientiously andimmediately tried new procedures in some selected casesto see if by hazard the test of practice might possibly upsetthe forecast of theory, and have not found that this hasproved possible; and f believe that spinal curvature, beinga mechanical failing, can only be successfully met byappropriate mechanical remedies, and my experiencescoincide with Dr. Fleming’s.

I am, Sirs, yours truly,Wimpole-street, May 4th, 1839. HEATHER BIGG.

LIVERPOOL.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Mr. Justice Stephen on Obscene Literature.ALLUDING to a case in the calendar at the recent

Assizes, his lordship observed: "A charge against a mannamed Charles Albert Longest would require some observa-tions from him. Longest was indicted on a charge of havingpublished and issued books of an ob-cene character, therebycontaminating and corrupting the morals of the people. Aconsiderable number of the books were found in the man’spossession, and they were of a kind setting forth subjects ofa very disgusting nature. Every medical man of commondecency or reputation would regard it as scandalous andan imputation upon him that he had anything to dowith such disgraceful books. No doubt a book of thatkind was calculated to offend any person of good tasteor good morals, or, in fact, any decent person. Butthe man was not indicted for the mere issue of thebooks-he was charged with procuring them for the purposeof unlawfully and wickedly uttering, publishing, selling,and disseminating the books amongst the subjects of HerMajesty the Queen, thereby contaminating and corruptingtheir morals. It was the duty of grand juries, in case theysaw any particular work which they thought likely to

injure morals, especially by obscenity, to accuse the personswho committed that crime. There was no doubt it was acrime. The last time he sat in that hall he punished severelythree men who were guilty of publishing grossly offensivephotographs. But a medical book was a different thing toa photograph. When a person dealt with disease, howeverignorantly or however disgusting might be the subject, hewas doing a thing which the best and wisest of men mightdo under other circumstances. A man might devote hislife to the study of certain subjects, and if he honestlyprinted an account of what he had to say, he did not thinklie ought to be indicted for it. If in this case the grandjury found these books were published merely to advertisehis business and to get custom, he did not think theyshould find a true bill; but if they considered that that wasa pretence, that there was no medical object in view,and that the idea was simply to corrupt the minds of thepublic, then they would return a true bill.

Death of Mr. E. H. Allen.Mr. E. H. Allen, resident medical officer to the Netherneld-

road Hospital for Infectious Diseases, died on May 28th,under unusually sad circumstances. He was in his usualhealth up to the evening of Friday, the 24th, when he lefta musical entertainment to return to the hospital, not feelingwell. It was soon apparent that he was suffering from anattack of scarlatina maligna, and in spite of every care andattention he sank, expiring on Tuesday evening. Thedeceased was in his thirty-seventh year, and had resided inLiverpool some years, having, previously to the appoint-ment he held at the time of his death, filled the posts ofassistant resident surgeon at the North and senior housesurgeon at the East Dispensary. His funeral, which tookplace last Saturday, was attended by a large number ofmedical and lay friends, and on Sunday the Rev. Canon

Taylor of St. Chrysostom’s Church, in his morning sermon,made a feeling allusion to his death.

Severe Thunderstorm.This city and its neighbourhood were on Sunday visited

by one of the severest thunderstorms ever experienced,which was followed by a hailstorm. The torrents of rainflooded parts of the city, the grids becoming choked. Somedamage was done to property, but fortunately no fatalityoccurred.

Handsome Gift to the Bootle, Hospital.’ The Bootle Hospital has been supplied with a horse’ambulance through the generosity of Mr. W. A. Matheson,a leading local resident, who formally presented it to thehospital on the 31st ult. In doing so, he mentioned Alder-man Webster as being the first to suggest the ambulance to,him and Mr. Wills, F. R. C. S. 1., through whose influence the-corporation of Bootle had been induced to take charge ofthe ambulance at the fire station, and to provide a horsefor it when required.

A Victim to Educational Over-pressure.Mr. Husband, deputy coroner for the West Derby dis-

trict, held an inquest last week upon the body of a girlwhich had been recovered from a pit at Ditton, two days.after the deceased had been first missed. Her sister stated,that she had been teaching in a school up to Mondaylast. She had never previously complained about anything,but had been much troubled as to whether she would pass.a scholarship examination for which she was studying. Shesaid, " I think I will go mad when I begin to think." Thedeceased was in the habit of studying all day long, withthe exception of about an hour. She left school lookingmuch troubled. The deputy coroner said it was a strangething that children should be subjected to such examina-tions and then kept in suspense for so long a time. Thejury returned an open verdict, expressing great sympathy-with the parents of the deceased.

Improved Arrangements for removing Patients withinfectious Disease.

III Forms of notice have been issued from the medical officerof health to medical practitioners, clergymen, emigrationagents, lodging-house keepers and others. When it isthought desirable that a person suffering from an infectiousdisease should be sent to a hospital, application accompaniedby a medical certificate must be made to the medical officerof health for an ambulance carriage. This will be sent to thepatient’s residence and will convey him free of any charge to.the hospital appropriated for the treatment of his particulardisease. Should the case be very urgent, the patient maybe sent direct, if suffering from small-pox, to the ParkhilLHospital ; if from typhus, scarlatina, or diphtheria, to thatof Graf ton-street; from typhoid or scarlatina, to the Nether-field-road Hospital; and from measles, to the WorkhouseHospital, Brownlow-hill. Any carriage or other vehicleused for the conveyance of a patient suffering from an’infectious disease must be taken to the disinfecting estab-lishment, Ford-street, Vauxhall-road, where it will be dis-infected without any charge. With such admirable arrange-ments as these in force and fully utilised, it ought to beimpossible for any infectious disease to assume epidemicproportions.

Stanley Hospital Bazaar and Fancy Fair.To relieve the Stanley Hospital from a burdensome debt,

a bazaar and fancy fair on a very magnificent scale is to beheld in Stanley Park during next week, under most dis-tinguished and influential patronage. It is hoped that asufficient sum will be raised, not only to pay on’ the debt.on the building fund, but also to justify the committee inopening the whole of the hospital to the public, placing attheir disposal the whole number of available beds, only aproportion of which are now used for want of funds.

Liverpool, June 5th.

BOARDING-OUT PAUPER CHILDREN.-The Bishop.of Chichester, presiding last week at the annual meeting ofthe Association for the Advancement of Boarding-outPauper Children, said they preferred to treat pauperchildren on the parental system, discarding all officialinstitutions whatsoever. This Association fostered theidea of independence and self-reliance, and relieved thecommunity of the burden of useh s, and unprofitablemembers, and assisted those who could not help themselves.