MAG App Object Scripts: Art By Culture or Date - ?· MAG App Object Scripts: Art By Culture or Date…

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  • MAG App Object Scripts: Art By Culture or Date - Descriptions 10/14/11 1

    American Art: 20th Century American Art Only a single work of American art appears on this version of the app, but be sure to visit the rest of the American collection on the 1st floor. Ancient Middle Eastern Art At the Crossroads See selected artworks produced up to 4,000 years ago by artists and artisans from the earliest societies of the Middle East and western Asia. Chinese Art Arts of Asia See a selection of traditional artworks produced by artists working over centuries of different dynasties and influences in ancient and medieval China. Egyptian Art Berkeley Gallery of Ancient Art Explore the decorative and functional works of art produced for daily, ceremonial, and funerary purposes in ancient Egypt.

    The Helen H. Berkeley Gallery is made possible by Helen H. Berkeley, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts and public funding secured by New York State Senator Joseph E. Robach. Etruscan Art The Helen H. Berkeley Gallery of Ancient Art See a selection of artworks representing the unique characteristics of the Etruscan civilization of ancient Italy.

    The Helen H. Berkeley Gallery is made possible by Helen H. Berkeley, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts and public funding secured by New York State Senator Joseph E. Robach. European Art: 19th Century European Art Only a single work of art from this period appears on this version of the app, but look for additional works of later European art in other areas of the 2nd Floor.

  • MAG App Object Scripts: Art By Culture or Date - Descriptions 10/14/11 2

    European Medieval Art European Art The period from about 1100 to 1400 in Europe is known as the Medieval Period, or the Middle Ages. Previously thought of as a "dark age" of lost knowledge, disease, and warfare, the period is now recognized for its own remarkable and distinctive arts, many supported by the Catholic church. Greek Art Berkeley Gallery of Ancient Art Explore a selection of artworks representing the beginnings and the legacy of the ancient Greek civilization.

    The Helen H. Berkeley Gallery is made possible by Helen H. Berkeley, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts and public funding secured by New York State Senator Joseph E. Robach. Indian & SE Asian Art Arts of Asia Selected works of art from India, Thailand, Indonesia, and Cambodia represent diverse yet related traditions, influences, and beliefs. Islamic Art At the Crossroads Explore a selection of decorative and functional ceramics, Medieval manuscripts, and ritual objects representing the spread of the Islamic faith and its art forms through the Middle East, Central Asia, and North Africa. Italian Renaissance Art European Art The period from about 1400 to 1600 in Italy is now known as the Renaissance. It featured a flowering of culture and art that looked back on the classical arts of Rome and Greece. Japanese Art Arts of Asia View a small selection of artworks made in Japan between the 1500s and the late 1800s, a period of cultural flowering and sharing known as the Edo Period.

  • MAG App Object Scripts: Art By Culture or Date - Descriptions 10/14/11 3

    Northern Renaissance Art European Art During the period from about 1400 to 1600 in northern Europe, especially Germany, France, and the Low Countries (modern Netherlands and Belgium), the arts incorporated influences brought north from Italy, yet retained features unique to Northern arts. Roman Art Berkeley Gallery of Ancient Art See a variety of material objects and works of art representing the civilization of ancient Rome and its reach across the ancient world

    The Helen H. Berkeley Gallery is made possible by Helen H. Berkeley, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts and public funding secured by New York State Senator Joseph E. Robach.

  • MAG App Object Scripts: American 20th C 8/26/11 1

    American Art of the 20th Century Only a single work of American art appears on this version of the app, but be sure to visit the rest of the American collection on the 1st floor. Memory William Ordway Partridge (American , 1861 - 1930) , 1914 Gift of Mrs. James Sibley Watson, 13.12 Cloaked, hooded, and over life size, Memory quietly dominates the space of the Foyer. She cradles a large urn in her arms, a funerary reference from ancient art. Her downcast features, shaded by her hood, give Memory a sad yet dignified appearance that fits her role: the personification of a mothers grief.

    A Fitting Tribute Commissioned by Emily Sibley Watson, the founder of the Memorial Art Gallery, Memory is a tribute to her deceased son James G. Averell. The statue was one of the first works of art to enter the Gallerys permanent collection when it opened to the public in 1913. Image = zoom view of Statue

    A View from MAGs Past In this historic photograph, Memory stands on the back wall of the current Renaissance gallery. She presides over a sculpture display that includes "casts in plaster of the most beautiful pieces of ancient sculpture, a replica collection no longer seen in modern museums. very limited space here!!! Image = The Hall of Casts, ca. 1914

    About the Artist: William Ordway Partridge William Ordway Partridge ranks as one of Americas most prominent sculptors of the early 1900s.

    Born in Paris to American parents, he studied art there, as well as in Florence and Rome. He became best known for monumental public sculptures of literary and historical figures such as Shakespeare and Ulysses S. Grant.

    Who was James Averell? James George (J.G.) Averell was the son of Gallery founder Emily Sibley Watson and her first husband. Averell studied architecture at Harvard, as well as on travels in Europe. His career was tragically short-lived, as he died of typhoid fever at age 27. Image = Portrait of James G. Averell, base of Memory, 13.13

  • MAG App Object Scripts: Anc Mid East + AAC 8/29/11 1

    Ancient Middle Eastern Art See selected artworks produced up to 4,000 years ago by artists and artisans from the earliest societies of the Middle East and western Asia. Cuneiform Tablet with Case Sumerian, Ur III (ca. ca. 2094 - 2047 BCE), 2049 BCE Gift of Mr. Gordon Thompson in memory of his father, William G. Thompson, D.D., a student of Babylonian archaeology, 54.58.4.1-2 Look carefully; this tiny clay object is easy to miss, at just about 1 inches square! The dots, lines, and wedge shapes on this 4,000 year old clay tablet are an example of cuneiform (say coo-NAY-ih-form), some of the worlds earliest writing. The records of entire Middle Eastern civilizations, from government accounts and business transactions to literary works and personal correspondence, were written on millions of ancient clay tablets.

    Translation from Sumerian: "[A number of] royal gurs of barley (gur = about a bushel), received from Ebagar of the town of Bazi; recorded by the scribe Lubimu, son of Urigalim, in the month of the barley harvest, the year that the city of Urbillum was devastated [by King Shulgis army]."

    Receipt Required? This small, rather plain-looking clay object is actually a 4,000 year old receipt proving payment of taxes. Notice the impressions left in the clay of the

    "envelope" by the cuneiform writing on the inner tablet.

    The message, or in this case a receipt for taxes paid, was inscribed into the still-damp clay of this tablet.

    When the small clay tablet with its inscribed message was dry, a second layer of damp clay was fitted around it, forming a primitive "security envelope." The message was inscribed on the outer envelope as well, and dried. If the inner and outer messages did not match, it proved that someone had tampered with the information.

    These red ink numbers are a later addition to the object. They are accession numbers, added by the Gallery to identify and keep track of the object in collection records.

  • MAG App Object Scripts: Anc Mid East + AAC 8/29/11 2

    Worshipper Bearing an Animal Offering Mesopotamian, possibly Old Babylonian, ca. 1900 -1500 BCE R.T. Miller Fund, 45.60 The man shown on this tiny molded clay plaque wears the fringed garment, round cap, and long curled beard typically worn by men in the ancient Babylonian culture. He cradles a small goat intended as a gift to the temple of one of his gods, to be sacrificed or added to the flocks maintained by the priests.

    Object of Devotion Worshippers in many cultures hoped to assure their gods' favor by presenting offerings, including choice animals, fine foods, and token objects known as votives. This clay plaque may have served as a votive to a god, as well as "proof" of the ritual performance and its accompanying gift. Image = zoom

    Tribute Bearer Achaemenid Persian; Made in Persepolis, ca. 650 330 BCE R.T. Miller Fund, 44.1 This man from the land of the Medes (say MEEDS), now in northern Iran, wears a typical Median horsemans costume: fitted coat, trousers, and soft felt helmet. He once joined the hundreds of carved, brightly painted figures representing servants, nobles, and foreign dignitaries, marching along ceremonial staircases at the ancient Persian capital of Persepolis (say per-SEH-poh-liss).

    Celebrating the New Year The covered vessel carried by this palace servant likely holds some delicacy intended for the kings banquet table.

    Dignitaries, nobles, and foreign rulers descended on Persepolis in March as guests of the king to celebrate Nowruz (say noh-ROOSS), the Persian New Year. They also appear carved onto the walls of Persepolis, wearing their distinctive costumes, bringing