March 2, 2006 Marriott Hotel

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S C D N. March 2, 2006 Marriott Hotel. Commissioners 2006 Performance Plan:. Increased capacity in the State Education Department Effective gap-closing strategies and policy implementation A mobilized USNY. As of June 30, 2004. As of June 30, 2005. Outcome. Number. Percent. Number. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Commissioners 2006Performance Plan:Increased capacity in the State Education DepartmentEffective gap-closing strategies and policy implementationA mobilized USNY

  • The Percentage of Students in the 2000 Cohort by Outcome After Four Years (June 30, 2004)and After Five Years (June 30, 2005)

  • Comparison of Records Reported Through STEP with BEDS First-Time Grade 9 Enrollment and Number Tested on Grade 8 Mathematics AssessmentNumber of Student Records Reported

    Number of Cohort Tested in Grade 8

    First-Time Grade 9 Enrollment (BEDS)199,312

    198,512

    203,917210,159

    198,512214,494

    199,330

    207,3152000 Cohort2001 Cohort2005 STEP2004 STEP2005 STEP

  • More About This CohortThese students were in fourth grade in 1995-96 before New York raised standards and in seventh grade when New York began testing the higher standards in 1999.In Spring 2000, these students took the middle-level ELA and mathematics assessments.ELA assessment performance: 13.4 percent of students statewide and 23.6 percent of students in New York City scored at Level 1.Mathematics assessment: 25.1 percent statewide and 44.3 percent in New York City scored at Level 1.

  • FindingsToo few students in this cohort graduated; too many dropped out.Certain groups of students graduated at a lower rate than other groups.

  • 2000 Cohort After Five YearsStudents in High Need Districts graduated at much lower rates than students in Average and Low Need Districts

  • 2000 Cohort After Five YearsFewer than one-quarter of students with disabilities in New York City graduated; in the rest of State, over 50 percent did so. Almost 1/3 of students with disabilities in New York City dropped out.

    Needs/Resource CategoryCohort Enroll-mentRegents/ Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaStill EnrolledTrans-ferred to GEDDropped OutNew York City5,61822.7%27.1%13.6%5.4%31.2%Rest of State18,16556.0%15.6%5.3%6.7%16.4%Total Public23,78348.1%18.3%7.3%6.4%19.9%

  • 2000 Cohort After Five YearsStatewide, fewer than half of limited English proficient students graduated. LEP students were more likely than other students to earn IEP diplomas.

    Needs/Resource CategoryCohort Enroll-mentRegents/ Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaStill EnrolledTrans-ferred to GEDDropped OutNew York City9,58440.2%4.1%15.9%5.1%34.8%Rest of State2,42656.7%1.3%11.1%8.7%22.2%Total Public12,01043.5%3.5%14.9%5.8%32.3%

  • 2000 Cohort After Five YearsBlacks and Hispanics were less likely than Whites and Asians to graduate and three times as likely to drop out.

    Needs/Resource CategoryCohort Enroll-mentRegents/ Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaStill EnrolledTrans-ferred to GEDDropped OutAmerican Indian/ Alaskan Native82956.1%3.5%6.3%9.3%24.8%Asian/ Pacific Islander14,17175.7%0.7%5.7%3.6%14.3%Black40,21652.6%2.9%11.9%8.4%24.2%Hispanic34,48249.4%2.5%12.2%8.3%27.6%White120,46183.3%1.8%1.7%4.3%8.9%

  • 2000 Cohort After Five YearsMales were less likely than females to graduate and more likely to drop out. This difference was more pronounced in New York City.

  • Outcomes After Four years for the 2001 Cohort

    Snapshot as of June 30, 2005

  • The Percentage of Students in the 2001 Cohort by Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 After Four Years for All Public High SchoolsRegents/Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaEnrolledTransferred to GEDDropped OutTotal137,7043,87739,38410,22623,303214,49464.21.818.44.810.9100.0Outcomes as of June 30, 2005Total PublicNumberPercent

  • More About This CohortThese students were in fourth grade in 1996-97 before New York raised standards and in sixth grade when New York began testing the higher standards in 1999.In Spring 2001, these students took the middle-level ELA and mathematics assessments.ELA assessment performance: 13.6 percent of students statewide and 23.1 percent of students in New York City scored at Level 1.Mathematics assessment: 26.4 percent statewide and 44.2 percent in New York City scored at Level 1.

  • 2001 Cohort After Five YearsFewer students had graduated or dropped out; more remained in enrolled. New York City students were least likely to have graduated and most likely to remain enrolled.

    Needs/Resource CategoryCohort Enroll-mentRegents/ Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaStill EnrolledTrans-ferred to GEDDropped OutNew York City73,81343.5%1.8%34.9%4.9%15.0%Large City8,75945.3%3.2%18.3%11.7%21.5%Urban/Suburban17,54257.6%2.7%16.8%8.3%14.5%Rural High Need14,53769.9%3.5%8.1%5.6%12.9%Average70,16378.1%1.6%8.9%4.1%7.3%Low Need29,51590.0%0.6%5.2%1.5%2.7%Charter Schools16524.2%0.0%64.8%1.8%9.1%Total Public214,49464.2%1.8%18.4%4.8%10.9%

  • The Percentage of Students in the 2001 Cohort by Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 after Four Years for 127 Selected High SchoolsRegents/Local DiplomaIEP DiplomaEnrolledTransferred to GEDDropped OutTotal17,85697015,6512,6177,52144,61540.02.235.15.916.9100.0Outcomes as of June 30, 2005Total PublicNumberPercent

  • Demographic Characteristics of Selected High Schools and All High Schools in 2003-2004Percent Eligible for FRPLPercent DisabledPercent Limited English ProficientPercent Repeating Grade 9Student StabilityPercent Certified TeachersBooks per 100 StudentsComputers per 100 StudentsSuspension Rate6014.514.22496791,180137.7%3413.15.815.398921,452248.1%CharacteristicsSelectedAll

  • Four-year high school graduation rates are too low.Many students are still in school after four years; many will stay in school one additional year.Most students who are still in school started 9th grade academically behind their peers.Few students are dropping out during the first four years of high school.If a student who stays for the fifth year doesnt graduate, he/she is likely to drop out.What Do These Data Mean?

  • What Can Be Done?

  • Transition From Middle School to High SchoolReview and revise professional development plans/Establish collegial circlesDetermine student preparedness for high schoolRevise 9th grader orientation programsDiscontinue social promotion

  • Targeted Intervention Programs for Students At RiskEstablish summer academies for at risk incoming 9th gradersDevelop an alternative program for at risk studentsEstablish school academies/programs to enhance language and math skills for identified 8th grade students transitioning to high school

  • Student Engagement, Recognition and SupportEstablish small learning communities in high schoolsEvery staff member adopts (mentors) a studentEstablish student advisories and town hall meetingsPartner with institutions of higher educationEstablish student of the month/recognition programs

  • Addition of elective course offerings to increase student engagementEstablish programs to promote student health and wellness and positive youth developmentImprove building securityMonitor student attendance and the guidance departmentExtend library hours to improve access to technology and study/research supportIncrease parent involvement through parent conferences, mailings, PTA meetingsEstablish student mentor/intern program

  • Academic Programs and ServicesRevise pacing and segmenting of academic instructionProvide transportation for after-school tutoringExtend the consultant teacher modelAdjust teacher schedules to allow for common planning time for all teachersEstablish a Word-of-The-Day programEstablish a model to be used by teachers in developing daily lessons plansEstablish Advance Via Individual Determination (AVID) programEstablish a reading intervention program

  • Audit the English as a Second Language ProgramRevise/establish system to ensure availability of high quality strategic/performance dataUse data to evaluate programs and to drive instruction and servicesEstablish a team of Literacy Specialists (or a Literacy Coordinator) to support literacy in the schoolsPrioritize literacy instructionEstablish SAT prep courses, honors classes and/or advanced courses to increase high school academic rigorEstablish programs/services to better support students with disabilities and English language learnersEstablish in-school detention disciplinary option

  • Fiscal Support/Realignment of ResourcesRealign school district fiscal resources to implement multi-year district planReview current programs; discontinue less effective programs and reallocate resources to support more strategic, high impact initiatives

  • LeadershipTarget professional development for principals and assistant principalsIntegrate teachers and administrator leadership developmentReassign/realign the roles and responsibilities of central office/high school administratorsEstablish new administrative positions (Director of Secondary ELA and the Academy Director for each secondary school)Revise school district feeder patterns for high schools

  • Urgent Action on Early Childhood EducationMake pre-kindergarten universal throughout the State.Change the compulsory school attendance age from six to five.Ensure adequate funding to all school districts so they provide full-day kindergarten to all students.Make sure that early education programs starting with pre-kindergarten are standards-based and research-driven, employ the best curriculum and instructional methods, maximize the integration of students with disabilities with their peers, and incorporate the resources of cultural institutions.Make sure school districts are able to hire and retain qualified teachers who can teach a diverse group of students with a range of needs.

  • Urgent Action on High SchoolsSet targets and measure results.Make local school boards accountable for high school performance.Check teacher qualifications and order changes where necessary.Strengthen teaching, especially in math and the sciences.Ensure safety.Engage the public.Improve achievement