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39:08 POLITICAL MÉNAGE À TROIS | DEATH BALLAD LOVE TELLERS | DINE AROUND VICTORIA FEB. 21 - 27, 2013 FEB. 21 - 27, 2013 INSIDE > LOVE IN VICTORIA - PART 3: LIVING APART POLITICAL MÉNAGE À TROIS | DEATH BALLAD L VICTORIA GOES WILD FOR THE CITY S HOTTEST COUNTRY MUSIC NIGHT Yee-Haw!

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Page 1: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

39:08

POLITICAL MÉNAGE À TROIS | DEATH BALLAD LOVE TELLERS | DINE AROUND VICTORIA

FEB. 21 - 27, 2013FEB. 21 - 27, 2013

INSIDE > LOVE IN VICTORIA - PART 3: LIVING APART

POLITICAL MÉNAGE À TROIS | DEATH BALLAD L

VICTORIA GOES WILD FOR THE CITY’S

HOTTEST COUNTRY MUSIC NIGHT

Yee-Haw!

Page 2: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

Vancouver Film School is coming to a city near you this February! Join us for a special Acting for Film & Television info session, where you’ll:

• Learn all about our acclaimed one-year and four-month programs

• Meet with Head of Department Bill Marchant (Da Vinci’s Inquest, Stargate SG-1)

• See yourself on camera in an optional screen test

• Get an inside look at student life

• Receive exclusive application and audition tips from VFS representatives

victoria conference centreSaturday, February 23 2:00pm—4:00pm

register now at vfs.com/victoria

[2] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

Page 3: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

The tragedy of three young lives lost in a hor-rifi c house fi re on Johnson Street this past weekend should be a wake-up call to all of us on the fl eeting fragility of life.

By all accounts, the three twentysome-things were wonderful people with bright futures ahead of them when what looks to be a simple acci-dent ended their journey far too soon.

The fi re department is still investigating the blaze, but preliminary results seem to suggest that a couch on the front porch had caught fi re during a party. The fi re was doused, but unseen cinders erupted again later in the night when everyone was asleep.

The sad truth is, accidents can happen to any of us at any time. And while we can’t live in fear, we do

need to fi nd ways to embrace life more fully while we’re able.It’s far too easy to get stuck in the mud worrying about debt and bills

and never getting to go on that vacation you promised yourself because “things are just too tight right now.”

It’s also easy to spend too much time stressing about work or the boss or the assignment that’s due next week and next month and . . . well, you get the idea.

And while stress is part of earning a living, it’s far too easy to let it eat up more time than it deserves.

Instead of stressing this weekend, why not plan some quality family time instead? Kick off your shoes and go for a walk with your loved ones. Explore the wonderful parts of this city that you’ve been too busy for, treat your family to one of our fabulous restaurants, or head up to the moun-tains for a day on the slopes.

Kiss your family. Laugh with your friends. Rediscover those horrifi c dance moves that only your wife can appreciate.

Sing in the shower. Who cares if you don’t know the words. Stop and smell the sea air. Watch the hummingbirds and be amazed at their speed. Feed the ducks and watch the peacocks strut. Savour a spot of tea.

Remember, work feeds your belly, but family feeds your soul.And before you leave the house, apartment or condo, take one extra

minute today to check your smoke detectors. Show your children how they work, explain why they’re important and make sure they have fresh batteries. Kiss your family again and enjoy your day — together. M

WIN TICKETS TO SEE LEONARD COHEN We love contests, so if you would like to win tickets to see legendary

singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen at the Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre on March 6, check out our online giveaway at: mondaymag.com/contests/

Embrace life more fully

GRANT [email protected]

EDITOR’S NOTE

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MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [3]

WEEKLY REPORT CARD

THE DANGERS OF DISCARDING DOCUMENTS Do away with your personal info the safe way at The Big Shred, Sat., Feb. 23, 9am-1pm in the parking lot of the Lodge at Broadmead (4579 Chatterton). Donations help the seniors at Broadmead Care.

SORRY, OFFICER, THAT WAS MY CARECARD The new BC Services Card took effect this week, giving new power and threat to our driver’s licences. Learn more at: bcservicescard.ca.

NOT A VERY SAFE TIME TO BE A MOOSE While Idle No More has taken centre stage of late, we tip our brims to the Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (last Sunday), as well as the Moose Hide Campaign, where supporters wear a small patch to stand against Aboriginal violence.

GRADE SUBJECT

NEWS & VIEWS > THE WEEK

When is the last time you v a c a t i o n e d in Victoria?

For those who call the south Island home, it can be easy to forget this old stomping ground is the pin-point that hundreds of thou-sands of visitors gesture to on a map when asked where they would like to visit. But before they get here, there is a rare opportunity to experience all

the city has to offer at a price that’s made for locals. Cue Dine Around & Stay In Town, one of the Island’s most anticipated dining experiences, returning for its 10th year in our city from Feb. 21 to March 10.

“Dine Around really brings a renewed interest in the culinary talent that we have here in town,” says Trina Mousseau, Tourism Victoria’s director of destination marketing. “It gets people out — whether you live here every day or are coming in from Vancouver or up Island — and gives every-one a reason to experience the culture we have in Victoria, which is so rich and diverse.”

The event, which has become a welcomed ray of sun to Victorians and businesses who can’t wait for the festive feelings of summer, is presented by Tourism Victoria and the BC Restaurant & Foodservices Association’s Victoria branch. For those who haven’t tried it before, the experience showcases participating restaurants offering spe-cial three-course menus for $20, $30 or $40 per person, as well as hotels offering special accom-modations from $79, $99 and $129 price points.

For the opportunity to really see Victoria from another view, the Delta Victoria Ocean Pointe Resort & Spa hits the experience with a double whammy: stay a night (from the $99 range), then dine at LURE Restaurant & Lounge ($30 point, and special celiac menu). The newly renovated resort is one location that offers the rare postcard view of the city and can give even residents a feeling of getting away.

“Many people don’t consider hotel restaurants when thinking of where to go to eat, but we have regulars who come here for their special date nights,” says the Delta’s Karri Rolofs. “Dine Around has always been an important opportu-nity for us to show people what we have to offer.”

LURE’s chef Dan Bain came to the restaurant in 2005 as saucier before becoming head chef in 2011. He uses his fiery passion for marine biology to give his own innovative take on local ingredi-ents with culinary artistry — think stenciled mes-sages specially inscribed to impress your date.

Just to cinch that extra touristy feeling, Be A Tourist In Your Hometown is celebrating its 40th year from Feb. 28-March 3, with $10 tickets allow-ing locals to experience free or heavily discounted attractions before the summer crowd hits. That’s not to say the experience won’t be packed.

Learn more at tourismvictoria.com/dinearound and attractionsvictoria.com/bat.

A NEW WAY TO GET CARDED The government is rolling ahead with the

BC Services Card, sent to replace the standard CareCard this week, even though the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner has not finished reviewing the program and the BC Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) and the BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (FIPA) are asking the government to put on the brakes.

Information and Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham has pointed to a number of shortcomings with the plan, and has called for a halt to any fur-ther expansion of the card without extensive public consultations on the risks and benefits of data link-age — the card is to be imbedded into B.C. driver’s licences. The BCCLA and BC FIPA, however, say that this will take more than a public consultation to fix.

“This government has got to come clean on the card before we are all forced to use it,” says Micheal Vonn, BCCLA policy director. “British Columbians have been provided almost no real information about it, and the Commissioner her-self says she was only given an ‘abbreviated time for review’ of the program.”

Yet the government maintains that the change is needed for a card that has not been significantly updated in the last 20 years. “This new card will be a secure piece of photo identification with many anti-fraud and security features including secure design, an expiry date and enhanced features which will help to protect citizens’ personal information,” says Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid.

The new card provides what the government is calling a “foundation” for the future development of access to online services. Hello, big brother.

VIVA LA RÉSISTANCE! Speaking of medical help, UVic’s Let’s Talk Science

program is taking on the worrisome idea of super-bugs, as antibiotic resistance becomes a growing phe-nomenon. How do we fight back? Find out at the free lecture “Antibiotic Resistance: Rise of the Superbug” with Lauren Whittaker and Leah Ellingwood, Tues., Feb. 26, noon-1pm at UVic’s Medical Sciences Building (Room 150, Ring Road). M

DANIELLE [email protected]

It’s your time to Vic-ation

DELTA VICTORIA OCEAN POINTE RESORT

The dregs of winter are the perfect time to vacation,

but for Victorians who hit up Dine Around & Stay In

Town, no airfare is needed to find that great escape.

Page 4: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

By Danielle [email protected]

In 1963, my grandmother found the love of her life. Both she and he were in their 40s, and had been separated from their spouses and families when they met and fell madly

in love. They never married, never lived together, but talk-ed every day, had regular date nights, vacationed together and kept their hearts fastened for the next 33 years until he passed away in 1996. Now, at age 91, my grandma still keeps his picture by her nightstand.

It’s not a structure that’s talked about openly, but Living Apart Together (LAT) relationships are becoming a bigger-than-ever trend in today’s dating scene. This isn’t your typical long-distance love affair — while some of these couples are forced apart due to circumstance, a growing majority of Canadian adults are choosing to stay in committed, monogamous relation-ships with an individual twist: they opt to live alone.

“The defining factor we see in LAT relationships is that while some people choose to live apart until marriage, these couples have no intention of co-habiting,” says Victorian Linda Breault, co-editor of a national LAT anthology project. “These people are committed and in love, but they want their independence as well.”

For the last two years, Breault and co-editor Dianne Gillespie have dedicated their lives to tracking down the stories of couples creating this shift. After putting out a request for submissions, the two were overwhelmed by the response and will publish over 30 first-person LAT accounts in their upcoming anthology Living Apart Together: A New Paradigm for Loving Couples. While there is currently no lit-erature published on the topic, University of Victoria and University of Manitoba researchers partnered in 2011 to examine their own study of couples who wanted to be together and apart.

“The majority of our age group for this study is over 35, and we’re seeing women who want their independence, men who want their space, and people who have experienced divorce and separation who want to be much more careful with their relationships this time around,” Dr. Karen Kobayashi, assistant professor and research affiliate with UVic’s Centre on Aging, told Monday in 2011. “What we’ve found so far is that a lot of the couples are coming to us and saying, ‘Thank you, this will finally validate our lifestyle — we’re so tired of explaining our choices to our families.’”

An estimated one-in-twelve Canadians live apart togeth-er. A study in 2003 showed that nearly 57 per cent of couples in the 20 to 29 age group lived in an LAT setup, which may have explained “commuter” or long-distance relationships with both partners pursuing a career. Back then, only 11 per cent of couples over the age of 50 chose the monogamous live-apart structure. Yet, Kobayashi and Breault have now separately discovered findings that have tipped the scales dramatically. More couples — and not just the young ones — are choosing to live apart in committed, monogamous relationships than ever before.

“In our submissions, we found about 15 per cent chose to marry and maintain their separate dwellings, though many more had been married in the past but wanted the comfort and security of a relationship that also gave them space,” says Breault.

Breault experienced her own taste of LAT while doing social work overseas, where she met Gillespie. Both women were introduced to many others who had happy, commit-ted relationships but had left their partners at home — some with no long-term plans of returning.

“So many of the women I met were living their own completely independent lives while maintaining part-ners and families, and other women who didn’t know about this who I told would say, ‘Wow, I would love to do that,’” Breault says. “It’s something that has been around for a long time but it hasn’t really been talked about — until now.”

Breault and Gillespie discovered four main categories in the submissions. First, voluntary LAT: those who select, wholeheartedly, to maintain both a relationship and priva-cy. Some examples include couples that had to “separate” to stay together, often renting apartments next to each other. Second, involuntary LAT: those separated by dis-tance, unable to live together due to immigration or work restrictions. Third, trial LAT: couples who are met with conflicting dreams or ideals and choose to pursue them for a trial period. Fourth, miscellanea: just as love comes in many forms, Breault and Gillespie found there were some cases where LAT worked inexplicably, like the senior man who opted to move into an assisted-care facility just to be near his wife who was suffering from Alzheimer’s.

“I’m a hopeless romantic who doesn’t believe in uncon-ditional love. I haven’t found any convincing reason why I have to live in the same house … as long as we keep danc-ing,” says Nanci, one of the anthology contributors, who classes herself in the volunteer LAT category.

For those who choose it, the two ladies learned there were a few main reasons that older adults, especially, weren’t so quick to shack up — fear of an unequal divi-sion of domestic labour and care giving; a desire to keep private homes for social activities with friends, adult chil-dren and grandchildren; concerns over the infringement

on financial autonomy and lifestyle; stress about decisions of where to live and what possessions to keep or share. But most important of all: keeping the love alive.

“One thing was true with all the couples who spoke with us for the anthology — they didn’t take each other for granted,” says Breault. “They worked hard to keep their connection strong, and they treasured every minute they had to spend together.” M

To learn more, or to make a submission to their project before publication, contact Linda Breault at [email protected].

Loving Apart:

NEWS & VIEWS > LOVE IN VICTORIA - PART 3

Couples choose to live apart together, as evolving structure gives newdefinition to the term ‘committed’

[4] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

Lace up for someone

you love Sunday, April 14, 2013 Willows Beach Park (Beach Dr. at Dalhousie)

Check In: 8:30 am Start: 10:00 am

Register now to end MS mswalks.ca | 250.388.6496

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Where the focus is on self-awareness and recovery.

Apr. 22 - May 3, 2013

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Each week we hide a “M” on the cover. Last week it was hidden on the right side

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Prove that you’ve found the “M” and get it into our office to win!

Drawn Monday at noon. Submit entries to: 818 Broughton St., Victoria, V8W 1E4 with daytime

phone number or fax it to our number at 250-386-2624.

Winner this week: ANN NEWTON

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Page 5: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

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For more information please contact: 250.391.2600 ext. 4521 or 4808 [email protected] SEATS ARE LIMITED

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STAGE

THURS. FEB. 21IN THE NEXT ROOM - (or The Vibrator Play) Theatre Inconnu presents an elegant comedy about love and longing. WED, THURS, SAT at 8pm and SAT and SUN at 2pm until March 2 at 1923 Fernwood. Feb. 20 is pay what you can. Tickets $14/10 are available at ticketrocket.org or 250-590-6291. (See review, P11)SPEAKING IN TONGUES-This fascinating and erotic play from Australia pays homage to film noir. Nine parallel lives – interlocked by four infidelities, one missing person and a mysterious stiletto – are woven through a series of fragmented confessionals where the lines between right and wrong become dangerously blurred. Runs WED to SAT at 8pm, WED at 1pm, SAT at 4pm until Feb. 24 at the Belfry Theatre. Tickets $25-40 at 250-385-6815 or belfry.bc.ca.REASONS TO BE PRETTY -UVic's Phoenix Theatre presents this Tony-nominated black comedy about love and relationships. Runs THURS-SAT at 8pm, and SAT at 2pm until Feb. 23 (3800 Finnerty). Tickets are $22/18/13 at 250-721-8000.HELEN'S NECKLACE -The Belfry Theatre presents a play by Carloe Frechette, In the heart of a chaotic Middle Eastern city, Helen, a Canadian, tries to retrace her steps in the hopes of finding a lost necklace. Her journey brings her face to face with the realities of a war-torn city and the many facets of loss. Runs WED-SAT at 8pm, SAT at 4pm and SUN at 2pm until March 3 in the studio. Tickets start at $25 at 250-385-6815 or belfry.bc.ca. (See review, P11)

FRI. FEB. 22THEATRICAL TREASURES -The Canadian College of Performing Arts Year 2 actors present classic and cutting edge theatrical presentations and perform a moving ode to endurance and hope featuring The Grapes of Wrath, directed by Darcy Evans. FRIDAY at 7:30pm and SATURDAY at 2 and 7:30pm at the CCPA Performance Hall (1701 Elgin). $15 at rmts.bc.ca or 250-386-6121.PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET- Dance Victoria presents Canada's only date for Seattle's Pacific Northwest Ballet. The powerhouse program features Balanchine, Robbins and Wheeldon. FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 7:30pm at the Royal Theatre. Tickets start at $29 at rmts.bc.ca or 250-386-6121.IN THE HEIGHTS-Spectrum Community School presents the BC premiere of this Tony award winning Broadway musical by Lin-Manuel Miranda, blending Latin American, new broadway and hip hop. FRI, SAT at 7:30pm at 957 Burnside. Tickets at 250-489-8271. Until March 3.

HELLO BABY-Theatre SKAM presents Lucas Myers’ hilarious and unique brand of observational humour for anyone who is going to be a dad, is a dad, has a dad or knows a dad. FRIDAY and SATURDAY at 8pm at Metro Studio. Tickets are $18/15 in advance at ticketrocket.org or 250-590-6291or $23/20 at the door.

SAT. FEB. 23THE OCCUPIED MIND OF MR. K-The play, by local playwright John Demmery Green, is presented by Intrepid Theatre Club as their next You Show. It explores what can happen when two unemployed friends convince a new-age, faux-Hindu guru to hijack the mind of a recently-deceased billionaire. 2 and 7pm at 1609 Blanshard. $12/10 cash only at the door or in advance at 250-370-9800.DANCE EXTRAVAGANZA-The Peninsula Young Performers and Allegro Performing Arts Centre present their annual dance show. 2 and 7pm at Charlie White Theatre (Mary Winspear, Sidney). $16 at 250-656-0275 or online at marywinspearcentre.ca.MANSCAPE - Rosie Bitts hosts an evening of all-male burlesque performance featuring Jett Adore, the 2012 King of Boylesque Russell Bruner, Magic Man Travis Brenhardt, Dave Morris, Jeremy Loveday, The Boxers are Brief and Jeff Poynter. 9pm at Victoria Event Centre (1415 Broad). $25 advance at Garden of Eden or eventbrite.com. $30 at the door. CONTRA DANCE - Everyone is welcome, beginner friendly, no partner required. Tunes by Odd Hack and calling by Bob Rentz. Lesson at 7pm, dance at 7:30pm at St. Matthias Church (600 Richmond). $8.STARLIGHT BALL - Social Ballroom dance hosted by Wanda Kivitt and Donna Lawrence. Workshop and waltz mixer with Wanda at 7:30pm, Dance at 8pm at Saanich Silver Threads (Les Passmore Centre, 286 Hampton). $15.

TUES. FEB. 26SIN CITY -This clever cast of improvisors is back with the third season of the live improvised weekly serial, Bedlam-by-Sea, set in a pub-hotel in a quaint seaside English village. Completely improvised and continues over 21 weekly episodes. Doors at 7:30pm, show at 8pm at the Victoria Event Centre (1415 Broad). Tickets are $15/12, cash only at the door.

GALLERIES

FRI. FEB. 22THE AVENUE GALLERY - Evolution: mixed media new works by Blu Smith. Opening reception 5-7pm. To March 7 at 2184 Oak Bay.

G++ INTERACTIVE MEDIA - Fish.e: an interactive window-front art installation by Paul Reimer and Gabrielle Odowichuk, two of the artist/engineers at Limbic Media. Opening reception 8pm at 1119 Fort.CACGV CAFE GALLERY - Mixed show of landscapes, portraits and still life. To March 3 at 3220 Cedar Hill.

✓ EVENTS

FRI. FEB. 22TSUKINO CON 2013 - For anime and manga fans, Tsukino-Con is be a great chance for anime and gaming fans to meet people with the similar interests, and show off their latest costumes or gaming skills. To SUNDAY. Opening FRIDAY 2pm until buildings close at University of Victoria’s Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS building). $25 for weekend. 250-474-5981, tsukinocon.com.

SAT. FEB. 23SEEDY SATURDAY - Check out the fourth-annual Seedy Saturday, Sooke's premier gardening and local food growing event. The family friendly day will feature a seed exchange and trading table, a diverse range of seed and plant vendors, local food artisans; educational displays featuring information on everything from composting to bees, to the history of farming in our region. 10am-3pm at Sooke Community Hall (2037 Shields). $5. 250-642-0503, [email protected] FIRST CO-OP DAY IN VICTORIA - Annual General Meeting of the Victoria Community Health Co-op. See displays by 18 Victoria area co-operatives, and the presentation: Peace, Co-operation and Sustainability by global co-op expert, Dr. Ian MacPherson. 11am-2pm at Fairfield United Church, (1303 Fairfield). By donation to the Creating Community Wellness Society, or food for the event. 250-477-4751.

SUN. FEB. 24THE BIG SHRED - Make that mountain of old bank statements disappear the safe way. Shredding is by donation to help the veterans, seniors and adults with disabilities served by Broadmead Care. 9am-1pm in the parking lot of the Lodge at Broadmead (4579 Chatterton). Suggested minimum donation of $8 per box. 250-658-3274. (See story P3.)WHO GIVES A HOOT - Who, who, who glides silently, can turn a head almost completely around and can cough-up a wicked hairball? Explore wonderful world of owls through games, stories, crafts, hands-on exploration, dissect an owl pellet and try your luck at a wicked game of owl bingo. noon-3pm at Swan Lake Nature Sanctuary (3873 Swan Lake). By donation. 250-479-0211.

WONDER SUNDAY, MY MUSEUM - Did you ever wonder how to start a collection? If you could design a museum, what would it look like, where would it be, and what would you keep? All ages workshop. 1-3pm at Royal BC Museum (675 Belleville). Free with admission. 250-356-7226.FAMILY ORIENTEERING - Be active with the whole family. CRD Regional Parks’ naturalists will have maps and compasses on hand, and a beginner level orienteering course set up at Beaver Lake. 11am-2pm at Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park (information kiosk in the Beaver Lake parking lot). Free. 250-478-3344.ROSS BAY CEMETERY GUIDED TOUR - Visit graves of many Black citizens in long ago Victoria. Co-Sponsored by the BC Black History Awareness Society and Old Cemetery Society. 2-3:30pm in front of of Oregano’s, Fairfield Village (1-1516 Fairfield). $5. bcblackhistory.ca.

MON. FEB. 25SPARKLING WINE COURSE - A companion to every occasion and from the first 'POP' of the cork, a bottle of bubbly lets everyone know it's time to celebrate. Travel the world in a glass of sparkling wine and explore what's behind the bubbles. 7-9pm at Monterey Recreation Centre (1442 Monterey). $55. 250-370-7300. AN EVENING OF CLAIRVOYANCE - Ara Parisien, internationally acclaimed Psychic Medium, will offer messages from the other side in this evening of evidence, empowerment and inspiration. 19+. Limited seating, arrive early or pre-book seating by emailing [email protected]. 7-9pm at Church of Truth (111 Superior). $20. 250-382-1133.

WORDS

SAT. FEB. 23CARDIAC CAFÉ: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WOMEN'S HEART HEALTH - See the fourth-annual event that is “Part cardiology bootcamp and part stand-up comedy!” Sign up with your girlfriends for this lively and important presentation about women's number-one killer. Featuring guest speaker heart attack survivor Carolyn Thomas. Registration includes coffee, tea and delicious heart-smart brunch goodies. 10am-noon at UVic's David Strong Building (3800 Finnerty). $12 + tax. 250-472-4747.PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH AND ANCIENT WISDOM - Common Sense, an Ayurvedic Perspective.Go beyond the latest fad or super product by understanding the principles of traditional medicine and Ayurveda, the "Science of Life" with practitioner and teacher Elham Ansari. 2-3:30pm at Awakening Wellness Centre (847 Fisgard). $25/$15 students. 250-412-5445.

MONDAY GUIDEEVENTS CALENDAREVENTS CALENDAR Email your listing info to [email protected]

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COVER IMAGE: GONE COUNTRY CREATOR JOEL FRIESEN. PHOTO BY JORDANA DICKSONX

Page 6: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

Howitzers aredisturbingharbour lifeI am writing to express my opinion about the ceremonial fi ring of the howitzers dur-ing events at the BC Legislature. With as many as 15 rounds

being fi red, I feel that this is inappropriate for the Inner Harbour. The extremely loud noise, concurrent con-cussions, and large amount of associated smoke (pollution) is not an activity that should take place in a densely populated urban area. You may not be aware

that about 20 of the boats moored at the causeway docks direct-ly below the fi ring how-itzers are occupied by individuals and families living aboard. My wife and I are less than 75 yards directly in front of the guns. I am grateful that the GVHA informs us of these events, but

still, it is very disturb-ing and often painful to be subjected to the noise and concussions.As you are well aware, there are many other people in hotels, offi ces and pedestrians who are subjected to this disturbing activity too. Many may not be informed prior to the

event. I would worry for anyone with a heart condition who experiences these very disturbing noises and concussions without warning. I would worry for them even with warning.While I am aware of the tradition of honouring various dignitaries and veterans, I personally do not believe that it is honouring anyone to have guns fi red at them. Surely there is enough of this activity already in the world

happening to civil-ians every day. We in Victoria do not need to play act at war, too.I hope that the powers that be will reconsider this very disturbing activity and devise a more appropriate method of displaying honour to dignitaries during these events.RICK SCHNURRand JUDY BROOKSMV JULIE MAYCAUSEWAY DOCKS,VICTORIA HARBOUR

Liberal adstoo negativeWhen the Liberals resort to negative advertising, it shows just how unfi t they are to govern. If they are willing to attack Adrian Dix, they'd be just as willing to attack you and that's exactly what they have been doing for 12 years. The Liberals have nothing left to offer except bit-terness and abuse.SUE STROUD,SAANICHTON

32%40%

27%

Maybe, but do we really know the risks?

Nofrakkingway

Yes, it's liquid gold

I don’t see why not. Just need to get enough people to sign up.GLEN MCELROY,Victoria

Yes. Less pollu-tion. Fewer cars and buses. Very Victoria.SAVANAH OMELKO,Victoria

I just had a bike stolen and have to save for another, so yes, if the price is right.JAMIN LEE,Victoria

Not with the helmet laws here.ANA BEDARD,Victoria

Would a bike-share work in Victoria?

THE POLLTHE POLLIs natural gas the way to a debt-free B.C.?

NEWS & VIEWS > OPINION STREET SMARTS

To participate in next week’s poll,go to mondaymag.com

Total Votes:136

Here’s a political ménage à trois for the ages.

It is called “Kool Topp & Guy Public Affairs” and it redefi nes op-portunism.

Yes folks, one of Premier Christy Clark’s fallen angels, disgraced chief advis-er Ken Boessenkool, is clawing his way back into the politi-

cal limelight on the back of NDP Leader Adrian Dix’s most trusted strategist, Brian Topp.

The third man in this marriage of pre-election convenience is Don Guy, a fea-tured speaker at the Liberals’ convention last October and a potential senior strate-gist for the coming election campaign.

Last September, Boessenkool suddenly resigned as Clark’s right-hand man in the wake of what was described at the time as an “inappropriate incident.” This incident was said to have transpired at the Bard & Banker Scottish Pub on Government Street following a Liberal golf tourna-ment. But, details were sketchy at best as the premier refused to elaborate because she did not want to see people who did

nothing wrong undergo an invasion of their privacy.

Topp, a failed candidate in the fed-eral NDP leadership race won by Thomas Mulcair, is a Dix confidante who is run-ning the party’s provincial campaign. Topp defines plugged in.

The announcement Boessenkool sent out states: “Imagine Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Sidney Crosby play-ing together, all the time. That’s why Brian Topp (the left winger), Don Guy (the centre) and I (the right winger) have teamed up. I am thrilled to announce the launch of Kool Topp & Guy Public Affairs.”

Boessenkool — just “Kool” to you — describes the new lobbying firm’s man-tra as “unparalleled longitudinal, vertical and horizontal line-of-sight into public sector decision-making in Canada, and beyond.” Sorry, that’s simply unadulter-ated horse hockey. The only line-of-sight element in this new firm will be Topp’s unfettered view into the office of the next premier, Adrian Dix.

I assume Boessenkool and Guy are along for the ride because they know how to link Topp with a new client base of deep-pocketed private sector players seeking access to the new NDP admin-istration. Boessenkool says: “Our princi-pals plan, but don’t lobby.” I trust he has the decency to blush.

I wonder if this trinity of consenting bedfellows has the blessing of the NDP leader. I would have thought that Dix would want to distance himself from speculation that a privileged insider will be encouraged to beat a path to his door.

Earlier this month, I enjoyed a couple of frosty Dos Equis in Mexico with my old pal Bill Bell, a former NDP campaign strategist and public affairs consultant who maintains close links with the party. He believes the election of an NDP gov-ernment will profoundly change the way corporations and advocacy associations communicate with Victoria.

He reminded me that government rela-tions (GR) firms have seen the writing on the wall for many months and some have hired new associates they believe have the right NDP credentials. However, these GR firms have failed to appreciate that “a paradigm shift is coming.”

I agree with Bell when he says that nothing less than a radical rethinking of the public affairs consulting model will suffice. He is assuming that Dix and the new government will take “a supremely dim view of lobbyists who assume their pedigrees give them right of passage into the corridors of power.”

I will not be surprised if, in the com-ing weeks, Topp announces that he is rethinking this new partnership. M

Political ménage à trois for the ages

KIERAN REPORT

BRIAN [email protected]

Five years after someone fi rst set about sweeping away the all-too-visible signs of poverty in the area around Pandora Green, someone fi nally thought to ask

members of the street community how they felt about life on the 900 block of Pandora. Last Friday, the Greater Victoria Committee to End Homelessness, along with the Radi-cal Health Alliance (RHA), gathered across from Our Place to serve food and ask Victo-ria’s homeless what they thought of the Pan-dora Green Good Neighbour Agreement.

“When you read between the lines of the Good Neighbour Agreement, the assump-tions that it’s putting forward about people

who use the 900 block are very stigmatizing,” says Seb Bonet of the RHA. “It puts forward the idea they they produce unsafety, that they are bringing down property values.”

Since its creation, the agreement recognized that the clien-tele of Our Place fit into the category of Neighbours on the 900 block, but while property owners, police and municipal officials

were deeply involved in the document’s creation, Friday was the first time many living on the street had even heard of it. Bonet says Friday’s event was an attempt to make up for the consulta-tion that the City of Victoria, Victoria Police,VIHA and property owners should have carried out when they signed the agree-ment back in 2009.

A central tenet of the agreement is that all neighbours should feel safe, welcome and comfortable, but a glance at the respons-es to the RHA’s survey indicate this is not the case. Amid calls for a safe injection site or a secure place to leave belongings to avoid having them confiscated or searched by officials, Bonet says a common theme was apprehension about the constant presence of police in an area populated by people whose way of life puts them at odds with the law.

The Pandora Green Good Neighbour Agreement is a micro-cosm of our region’s approach to the harsh realities of poverty. Instead of searching for a balance between the needs of the street community and other interests, it succumbs to paranoia and misinformation. Instead of providing hope, it seeks to “man-age social issues to reduce or eliminate their impact,” calling for more enforcement, more restriction, and blindly trailing behind those who still believe we can police poverty away. M

With neighbours like these . . .

SIMON [email protected]

CITY WATCHDOG

[6] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

Don’t just sit there and fume, write to us.

Snail: 818 Broughton, V8W-1E4

E-mail: [email protected]

Not every letter makes it to print,

but we do read everything we receive.MAILMAIL

Page 7: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [7]

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MONDAY GUIDE > ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

An hour before Upstairs Cabaret opens its doors Thursday night, the line out-side will have already started. But the scene is more tail-gate party than a

red carpet affair.Guys dressed head-to-toe in denim, huge belt

buckles and cowboy hats keep girls in skin-tight plaid and braided pigtails warm until they can all hit the dancefloor at Victoria’s hottest country music night, Gone Country Live.

Inside, the bar is transformed from sea-side lounge to southern-style roadhouse, with bales of hay and people crushing cans of Pabst Blue Ribbon.

The dancefloor is packed with line-dancers and two-steppers. There’s hootin’ and hollerin’ all around. And in the air — the sweet sound of live country music — courtesy of house band, The Tumblin’ Dice.

The event, now running monthly at the time-honoured live music venue and nightclub in Bastion Square, began as an idea by a local bartender eight years ago and has ballooned into one of the biggest, and most anticipated, club nights in town — with the venue packed to capacity early, leaving many waiting outside all night hoping for a chance to get in on the party. Go to another club nearby and there’s a high probability you’ll see some of the spillover.

“I always had a love for country music,” says Gone Country creator Joel Friesen, who grew up “driving jacked-up muddy pickups” in Sidney and working on his family’s 3,000-acre farm in Manitoba. “It hasn’t always been cool to express that, but as you get older you get more comfort-able with it,” he says with a laugh.

Friesen originally thought a country-themed club night in a city like Victoria would be a tough sell when he pitched it to what was then Red Jacket nightclub, but with the support of his manager and his friends, he made it a success.

“The first one was packed to the gills,” he says. Friesen held an event every few months before

he took off to the Cayman Islands to work. It wasn’t long though, before he was back in the saddle, so to speak. He moved back to Victoria, became the general manager of Upstairs and decided to get back on the horse.

Friesen approached Ryan Evans of The Southern Urge, a rock ‘n’ roll band with country compulsion who played a weekly gig at Upstairs Cabaret’s downstairs partner Darcy’s Pub, to form a new band to play live country music covers at the revived event. Evans (vocals, gui-tar) partnered up with Andrew Laing (guitar), drummer Luke Renshaw (Hannah Georgas, Jets Overhead), and bassist Leigh Grisewood to form an in-demand country cover band with set lists that include popular “new country” artists like Keith Urban, Toby Keith and Tim McGraw along-

side “old country” favourites like Hank Williams and even a few originals. (New single “This old House” http://goo.gl/Y1BKy )

“After we did the first Gone Country we knew we had some-thing special on our hands,” says Evans. “It’s come from a humble gathering of great country music fans, to the biggest night this city has ever seen. Now we have people coming from places like Nanaimo, Duncan and Vancouver just to see what everyone’s freaking out

about.”“The entire dance floor is so focused on the

band,” says Friesen, who is now in operations development for Upstairs and Darcys. “People are singing along, everyone’s all smiles, dancing, yelling, the vibe is so high. It’s just a room full of people whose primary focus is to have a good time.”

For those coming from out of town or who just want guaranteed entry, Friesen puts 100 prior-ity access tickets for sale online (tinyurl.com/bc3gj6o). Ladies are always free.

Keep your ears open for a country music con-cert announcement too. Friesen will be announc-ing a concert by a multiple Juno and Canadian Country Music Award winning artist Thursday night. M

PHOTO CREDIT

The Vancouver-born son of roots-rocker Barney Bentall is pulling

double duty Saturday night at Lucky Bar as he and his new band The Smokes co-headline a tour with emerging Cana-dian alt-country songstress Lindi Orte-ga. But Dustin Bentall and the Smokes won’t only be playing one set, they’re also Ortega’s backing band.

The two have the same agent in Canada and when Bentall heard Ortega was looking for a backing band, he sug-

gested they take on the job. They all piled into one tourbus and have been clocking miles all over Canada and the U.S. The Victoria show is the last of the tour.

Bentall is promoting his latest EP Orion, his first with this new band, featuring Kendel Carson, Del Cowsill and Rich Knox.

Tickets are $20 at Ditch Records, Lyle’s Place and online at Ticketweb.ca. M

City SomethingCity Something OUR TOP PICKS FOR FEB. 21 – 27

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Dustin Bentall and the Smokes light up Lucky Bar, Sat., Feb. 23.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

Country music in Victoria isn’t only for the trendy nightclubs of downtown. Montgomery County has been wielding their country twang the way coun-

try started — with rednecks. From opening for Canadian country music super-star George Canyon back in 2011 to the beer gardens of the Western Speedway, the Saloon stage of Sunfest and local haunts like My Bar and Tudor House, lead singer Wayne Montgomery and the band have taken on new country’s finest for the past three years, covering new classics like “Red Solo Cup,” “Put A Girl In It” and “The More I Drink.” The group may not be the youngest country act in Victoria, but they’re as country as it gets. According to Montgomery, Victo-ria’s pretty country too. “Cowboy culture might not be as strong in Victoria as in places like Shawnigan and Duncan, but it is here! Lots of our fans are young and lots are in full country attire. You can’t just buy that stuff at the Mayfair Mall.” Join the county crew Fri., Feb. 22 at My Bar (9pm, 310 Gorge East in the Hojo), take a drive to The Black Swan Fri., March 1(Shawnigan Lake) or at the Tudor House Sat., March 2 . M — By Colin Cayer

MARY ELLEN [email protected]

Page 8: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

[8] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

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Astrange and brooding caravan is heading for our coastal town. Its journey began on the

prairies, has continued into the foothills, over the mountains, and now across the sea. Bellies of the caravan’s singers overflow with good cheese and fine wine, but more importantly, these bellies surge with timeless tales of death and woe. The tour, aptly called “The Death Ballad Love Tellers

Tour,” makes its final stop in Victoria on Sat., Feb. 23.

This isn’t the first time the Death Ballad Love Tellers have unit-ed. By the time they reach Victoria, David P. Smith, Ben Sures and Bubba Uno will have completed three tours together. And the chemistry between the diverse songwriters has proven so inspiring that they plan to record an

album of original material after their Victorian date. As Sures confides, he’s been longing for this moment since the idea was presented to him two years ago.

“I immediately suggested that we give (the tour) a name so it would be more than just three guys on the road playing their songs. We all agreed on ‘Death Ballad Love Tellers’ as all of our songs touch on these themes. I subconsciously hoped that the title would kick our asses into writ-ing some murder ballads, and it worked. We’ve all written songs in the genre for this tour: I’ve writ-ten five, Bubba’s written a few and David’s written a 10- minute-long epic.”

With a name every bit as compelling and myste-rious as the tour itself, Merlin’s Sun Home Theatre (1983 Fairfield) is a perfect choice of venue for the balladeers’ last stop. The Fairfield home, complete with a 30+ seat theatre, will provide a suitably dramatic backdrop for these modern day trou-badours who prove, night after night, that some songwriting traditions are timeless.

Call 250-598-7488 or email [email protected] for reservations. $20. 8pm. M

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Drop off: 818 Broughton Street, VictoriaTitle of Limerick. Include contact information. Winners decided by a panel of celebrity judges and published in our March 14 issue.

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Page 9: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

FOOD&DRINK MORE ONLINE…mondaymag.com@MondayMagFind us on facebook

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PAM [email protected]

New Kids on the Block Family flare in Oak Bay

Towards the end of last year, a new restau-rant on the eastern edge of the Oak Bay Village quietly opened its doors. If early in-dications are anything to go by, this one is here to stay.

I didn’t really know what to expect from the Oaks Restaurant and Grill. Owners Isa Hosein and Nick Hopkins met in Calgary in high school about half their lives ago (neither have yet reached the age of

30). It doesn’t sound like a recipe for suc-cess in a neighbourhood known for

its, shall we say, population well over 30.

Did they have any idea what they were doing

opening a restaurant in an area of town where even experienced operators struggle? Maybe they did, maybe they didn’t. They took posses-sion in October and

put hours into a face-lift, though on the three

occasions I have visited, no one could pinpoint any

great visual difference between the current room and its immedi-

ate predecessor, the Oak Bay Bistro.Esthetic changes aside, the critical ones involved

food and service, and this is where their experi-ence shows. Both know their way around a kitchen and understand business, an essential combination missing far too often from new eateries. Hosein started his career early in the family restaurant and started his own delivery business in Alberta at the age of 19. Hopkins studied cooking at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, arrived in Victoria and started a catering company. When he saw an ad for premises in Oak Bay, he convinced his friend to move west.

They opened for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Chef Darcey Smith crafted menus for each, which are comprehensive without being overwhelming. You can start your day with a range of omelettes, eggs benedicts, buttermilk waffles or fry-ups. Lunch and dinner offerings tread a careful line between the expected (fish and chips, bangers and mash) and a few surprises.

On my first visit, I had a rather moreish pizza and my friend, Jessica, a perfectly-executed Reuben on marbled rye bread, served with rich butternut squash soup — both better than we expected. Equally impressive was the service — not only attentive, but

Continued on next page

MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [9]

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Page 10: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

NEW KIDS IN OAK BAY

MONDAY > FOOD&DRINK

Continued from previous page

If your palate needs a kickstart and you want something different, grab a bottle or two from Vancouver Island Brewery’s seasonal series.If you missed it at Octoberfest, grab one of

the remaining bottles of Harvest Märzen, created to celebrate the end of the summer harvest.This smooth, creamy beer represents the bounty of a season’s hard work, from plow to pint, and is great with grilled bratwurst or on its own.

Dough Head Gingerbread Ale allows you to combine a couple of your favourite things — mix-ing the best of brewing and baking to create a spicy tipple pleasantly balanced with a malty sweetness. Do as the brewery suggests and instead of a trail of breadcrumbs through the dark forest, follow this delicious treat for a pint of perfection. M

By Pam Grant

DRINKUP

STEAK SALAD DOTTED WITH CHERRY TOMATOES, BOCCONCINI AND DRESSED WITH GARLICKY CHIMICHURRI

informed. When we asked about the tea selection, instead of receiving the usual response of “We have a range of teas” followed by silence, our server listed each one. On my next visit, I was dining with a friend who has to pick and choose her venue very carefully because she has celiac disease. Not only did this same server point out all the options, but she offered a few that weren’t on the menu. When Judith decided on a gluten-free pizza, the kitchen sent back word that the pepperoni could be an issue and suggested an alternative topping. She switched to a buttery grilled cheese sand-wich on gluten-free bread with roasted tomato soup, which she raved about as I worked my way through an enormous steak salad dotted with cherry tomatoes, bocconcini and dressed with garlicky chimichurri.

On my third visit, I went for dinner. I was considering a pasta or short ribs, but Don and I both gave in to burgers (classic beef, bacon and cheese, and chorizo with banana peppers.) I was amused to find the same server, who looked a little shocked when we asked if we could have half fries and half salad. “Of course,” she said. Thank you, Victoria. I hope Hosein and Hopkins know what an asset they have in you. She even talked us

into dessert — a stupidly rich brownie with vanilla ice cream, worth every calorie.

The Oaks Restaurant and Grill is well on its way to acheiving its stated goal of creating an afford-able spot that families can visit regularly. Food and service are both above average and the price is right (a kid’s menu offers a number of items for $7 and under). It’s nice to see a place where three generations of the same family can enjoy a meal together, with something for everyone, without breaking the bank or relying on a wall of deep fryers.

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Page 11: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [11]

“I’m lonely!” – Mrs. GivingsTheatre Inconnu kicks off its 2013 season

with a winner: In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) by Sarah Ruhl. Basically, it rocks. By turns funny, touching and sexy, Theatre Inconnu’s produc-tion bewitches, providing real catharsis and a tran-scendent, exquisitely tender ending.

In the Next Room takes place in an 1880s spa town in New York State (not to be confused with the infe-rior 2011 film Hysteria about a similar subject, but set in England.) Mrs. Givings watches as her husband treats a parade of women (and, eventually, men) for what he diagnoses as “hysteria.” Whatever their con-temporary diagnoses would be, Dr. Givings prescribes rigorous application of electrical charge; in other words, he stimulates them with a vibrator he has invented. Meanwhile, Mrs. Givings remains unaware of the details of her husband’s practice.

Ruhl describes her writing style as interpreting “how people subjectively experience life” because “everyone has a great, horrible opera inside of him.” She also says that her plays have a “medieval sensibil-ity of … transformation.”

The performances are uniformly excellent. Each actor brings tremendous, subjective vitality to their roles. Odile Nelson as Mrs. Givings completes a trans-formative character arc, beginning in smug, racist propriety and finishing by revealing her profound needs. Nelson’s character leads with her hands, which flit about the stage, trying to keep things in their place, and nudge things to where she feels they should be.

Dr. Givings, played by Julian Cervello, captures the persona of a 19th-century man of science, sure of his practice, even if he is oblivious to the emo-tional upheaval he unleashes around him. In the end, Cervello provides Dr. Givings some humanity and vulnerability. Frequently, actors have to change out of layers of 19th-century women’s costume — on stage — while still meeting all of the beats of a tightly-scripted play. It is an impressive feat.

Director Naomi Simpson also gets credit for both set and light-ing design. It’s a wonder how Simpson choreo-graphs a large ensemble cast, unwieldy furniture and complex costume changes, all on Theatre Inconnu’s shallow stage. The set is divided in two, as the script requires: one side is Dr. Givings’ office; the other is Mrs. Givings’ sitting room (which dou-bles as her husband’s wait-ing room). Simpson, as lighting designer, synchs lighting changes with the action as it moves from room to room. At times, both rooms are lit; at other times, one room is dim but the action is still discernible. The result is layers of accented action. In Mrs. Givings’ sitting room, an era-appropriate piano sits, poorly tuned, serving as an apt meta-phor for her loneliness and neglect.

If there is any justice, Theatre Inconnu has a hit on their hands. See their production of In the Next Room while you can.

Read the full review by Brent Schaus at mon-daymag.com. In the Next Room runs at Theatre Inconnu (1923 Fernwood) Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 8pm, and Saturday and Sunday at 2pm until March 2. Tickets are available at ticketrock-et.org or 250-590-6291.

“We cannot go on living like this.” – HelenFor the first time in many years, The

Belfry Theatre has opened up its smaller studio space to its own programming: Helen’s Necklace by Carole Fréchette. It is a quiet, intimate produc-tion, thoughtfully presented. At times, though, it does not quite leave the shallow end.

Fréchette wrote Helen’s Necklace (translated from the original French by John Murrell) after spending some time in Lebanon. A one-act play, the action takes place during a lengthy cab ride with many stops. Helen (Tracey Moore) searches for her lost necklace, made of cheap plastic but of immense personal value, in a nameless Arab country. She comes across many locals, all played by the same actor (Lee Majdoub). Helen’s Western values meet the troubled reactions of a war-torn country. As Helen comes to accept her loss, she is — in a way — found.

Tracey Moore as Helen shows courage in dis-playing unattractive self-regard. She almost does a number of face-plants as she pursues her mis-sion. Demurely she reins herself in, trying to con-ceal her need to find the necklace. As her charac-ter’s arc moves from self-interest to self-forgetting, Moore displays glimpses of Helen’s humanity; however, I could not help but feel as if Moore’s characterization stopped short of the deep end. The transformation would have been more radi-cal, and affecting, had it plunged into sadness and compassion rather than wading in part of the way. I suspect that, as the play continues its run, Moore will bring Helen to the depths she requires (and craves).

Read the full review by Brent Schaus at mon-daymag.com. Helen's Necklace runs at The Belfry Wednesday to Saturday at 8pm, Saturday at 4pm and Sunday at 2pm until March 3. Tickets at 250-385-6815 or belfry.bc.ca.

MONDAY GUIDE > THEATRE

To enter send an email with 21 in the subject line to [email protected] by Monday February 25th at midnight.

Include your full name and phone number. Winners will be contacted by phone. Screening will take place at 7pm at the Odeon on Wednesday February 27th

21 and Over opens in theatres March 1st!

ENTER TO WINENTER TO WINa double pass to the advance screening of

21 AND OVER

REVIEW: HELEN'S NECKLACEREVIEW: IN THE NEXT ROOM

Page 12: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

[12] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

MONDAY GUIDE > FILM TWILIGHT OF THE ACTION GODS

Literally within weeks of each other we’ve seen the release of non-ironic action flicks starring

aging gods of the blowed-up-real-good genre, beginning with Arnold Schwarzenegger and con-tinuing with Sylvester Stallone (still impressively ripped). And now, limping into distant third place comes Bruce Willis in A Good Day To Die Hard, once again reprising his role as John McClane, cop and quipster and bane of all terrorists.

In this fifth outing for the increasingly tired series, McClane travels to Russia to help out his estranged son. Unbeknownst to dear old dad, Jack is now working for the CIA and this dynamic duo soon find themselves battling Russian mobsters with plans to hijack weapons-grade uranium. The resulting plot is a formulaic jumble of gunfights, car chases, and explosions, interspersed with bick-ering between father and son that is presumably supposed to be cute but is merely grating.

As well as looking a bit grimy, the movie is cheerless and dull. Back in the day, John McClane was resourceful, vulnerable, brave . . . and funny. Now, he’s just a bitter bald guy with the near-invulnerability of a superhero. And don’t even ask if the plot makes sense. In short, this Good Day represents a very bad day at the movies.

END-OF-LIFE LOVE STORY

Any film lover who want a broken heart is ad-vised to see Amour, the latest drama from cel-

ebrated Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke (The White Ribbon, Cache). Nominated for five Os-cars and the recipient of numerous other awards, Amour tells the story of Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) and Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), retired mu-sic teachers in their 80s whose quiet and genteel life is reflected in an apartment filled with music, books and art. With no warning, Anne has a mini-stroke. Later, a second and much more severe at-

tack leaves her paralyzed on one side. Confined to a wheelchair and entirely dependent on her hus-band, Anne makes him promise that he will never take her back to the hospital.

In a scene where Georges helps his wife off the toilet, their embrace looks like a clumsy dance. And when Anne upgrades to an electric wheel-chair and begins to master it, her spinning around in circles provokes a rare moment of laughter for the couple. But her condition continues to worsen, and eventually he’s changing her diapers and feeding her like a baby, while her tormented speech is mostly babble. There are a few moments when civility slips, but Georges accepts his bur-den with stoic grace. He hires a nurse to come by thrice weekly, but mostly shuts out their worried daughter (Isabelle Huppert) from this final chap-ter of a long and loving marriage. “Your concern is of no use to me,” he tells her with bleak logic.

Understated, unsparing, and ultimately emo-tionally devastating, Amour is a superbly inti-mate drama. And, being a film by Haneke, there are some shocking moments that will challenge most viewers. Marvelously acted and powerfully humane, this film captures the raw reality of a death in the family. M

AMOUR ★★★★Directed by Michael HanekeStarring Jean-Louis Trintignant, William ShimellPG13 - 127 minutesContinues at The Odeon

A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD ★Directed by John MooreStarring Bruce Willis, Patrick StewartR - 100 minutes • Continues at The Odeon, SilverCity, Uni 4 and WestShore

OPENING

SNITCH - Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson stars as a dad who goes undercover for the DEA in order to help out his innocent son, who went to prison after being made the fall guy for a drug deal. With Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Starts Fri.DARK SKIES - In this paranormal shocker, members of an unsuspecting suburban family gradually realize that a terrifying and deadly force is out to get them. Starts Fri.

SCREENINGS

MOVIE MONDAY - Is re-screening May I Be Frank, the engaging and life-affirming portrait of a morbidly-obese drug addict whose love of life compels him to undertake a radical transformation. 6:30/8:30pm MONDAY in the 1900-block Fort. By donation. 595-FLIC. moviemonday.ca.SOCIAL JUSTICE FILM NIGHT -presents Freedom Sailors with guest speaker Dr. Bill Dienst, co-author of the book about the first successful voyage to break the Israeli government's blockade of the Gaza Strip. These 2008 events as well as the current state of affairs in Gaza will be discussed. THURSDAY, 7 pm, 2994 Douglas St. (BCGEU Hall).

IMAX

★★★★ EVEREST -(2 pm & 9 pm, Sun.-Thurs.) FIRES OF KUWAIT -(1 pm & 7 pm, Sun.-Thurs.)JANE GOODALL'S WILD CHIMPANZEES -(10 am & 4 pm)★★★½ MYSTERIES OF THE GREAT LAKES -(11 am & 5 pm)SHARKS -(3 pm & 8 pm, Sun.-Thurs.)★★★★ SKYFALL -(7 pm, Fri.-Sat. only)SUPER SPEEDWAY -(noon, 6 pm)

FILM LISTINGSFILM LISTINGS

AMOURA Film by MICHAEL HANEKE

JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT EMMANUELLE RIVA

A SONY PICTURES CLASSICS RELEASE LES FILMS DU LOSANGE X FILME CREATIVE POOL WEGA FILM PRESENT JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT EMMANUELLE RIVA ISABELLE HUPPERT “AMOUR” MICHAEL HANEKE WITH ALEXANDRE THARAUD WILLIAM SHIMELL RAMÓN AGIRRE RITA BLANCO CAROLE FRANCK DINARA DROUKAROVA LAURENT CAPELLUTO JEAN-MICHEL MONROC SUZANNE SCHMIDT DAMIEN JOUILLEROT WALID AFKIR MICHAEL HANEKE DARIUS KHONDJI A.S.C., A.F.C. JEAN-VINCENT PUZOS CATHERINE LETERRIER GUILLAUME SCIAMA AND JEAN-PIERRE LAFORCE MONIKA WILLI AND NADINE MUSE A FRENCH-GERMAN-AUSTRIAN CO-PRODUCTION MARGARET MENEGOZ

LES FILMS DU LOSANGE STEFAN ARNDT X FILME CREATIVE POOL VEIT HEIDUSCHKA MICHAEL KATZ WEGA FILM MARGARET MENEGOZ FRANCE 3 CINEMA ARD DEGETO BAYERISCHER RUNDFUNK WESTDEUTSCHER RUNDFUNK FRANCE TELEVISIONS CANAL+ CINE+ ORF FILM/FERNSEH-ABKOMMENMINISTERE DE LA CULTURE ET DE LA COMMUNICATION CENTRE NATIONAL DU CINEMA ET DE L’IMAGE ANIMEE, REGION ILE-DE-FRANCE FILMFÖRDERUNGSANSTALT MEDIENBOARD BERLIN-BRANDENBURG CNC/FFA MINITRAITE ÖSTERREICHISCHES FILMINSTITUT FILMFONDS WIEN EURIMAGES MEDIA LES FILMS DU LOSANGE

©2012 LES FILMS DU LOSANGE X FILME CREATIVE POOL WEGA FILM FRANCE 3 CINEMA ARD DEGETO BAYERISHER RUNDFUNK WESTDEUTSCHER RUNDFUNK

WITH THEPARTICIPATION OF

A FILMBY

DIRECTOR OFPHOTOGRAPHY

SCRIPT &DIALOGUES

PRODUCTIONDESIGNER

COSTUMEDESIGNER

SOUNDBY

EDITEDBY

PRODUCEDBY

IN COOPERATIONWITH

CO-PRODUCEDBY

SUPERVISINGPRODUCER

WITH THESUPPORT OF

INTERNATIONALSALES

francetélévision

BEST PICTUREACADEMY AWARDTM NOMINATIONS

INCLUDING5 BEST DIRECTORMichael Haneke

BEST ACTRESSEmmanuelle Riva

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAYMichael Haneke

WINNERBEST ACTRESSEMMANUELLE RIVA

WINNERBEST PICTURE

OF THE YEARNational Society of Film Critics

Los Angeles Film critics AssociationNew York Film Critics OnlineBoston Society of Film Critics

San Francisco Film Critics CircleEuropean Film Award

Lumière AwardLondon critics’ circle Award

BAFTA Award NomineeCésar Award Nominee

National Society of Film CriticsLos Angeles Film Critics Association

Time MagazineThe New York Times A.O. Scott

Los Angeles Times Kenneth TuranCannes Film Festival Palme d’Or

Lumière AwardBAFTA Award NomineeCésar Award Nominee

“THE BEST PICTUREOF THE YEAR. ‘AMOUR’ IS A

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EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT NOW PLAYING! Check theatre directories for sho wtimes

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VIOLENCE, NUDITY

Page 13: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [13]

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

VintAgeous Vintage Fair40 stalls of vintage clothing,

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(DJ Fri. night, fashion shows both days)Fri. March 1st, 6-9:30pm

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PERSONALS

HOW TO REPLY:For written responses, please send $3.00 and envelope addressed to: Box #_ _ _ C/O Monday Magazine 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4. Voice Personals members can also reply by phone at 250-383-6111.

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HELP WANTED

Journeyman HD mechanic required for oilfi eld construc-tion company. Duties will in-clude servicing, maintenance and overhaul of our equip-ment. The job will be predomi-nately shop work , but with a portion of your time spent in the fi eld. A mechanics truck will be supplied for you. The job is based in Edson, Alberta. Call Lloyd at 780-723-5051.

HELP WANTED

EXPERIENCED PARTS Per-son for a progressive auto/in-dustrial supplier. Hired appli-cant will receive top wages, full benefi ts and RRSP bonus-es plus moving allowances. Our 26,000 sq.ft. store is locat-ed 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmon-ton, Alberta. See our commu-nity at LacLaBicheRegion.com Send resume to: Sapphire Au-to, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: [email protected]

Flexible P/T & F/T Work!Seeking friendly enviro

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GUARANTEED JOB Place-ment: General Laborers and Tradesmen For Oil & Gas In-dustry. Call 24hr Free Record-ed Message for Information: 1-800-972-0209.

HELP WANTED- Prince Rupert BC.

WAINWRIGHT MARINE SERVICES LTD.

Deckhand- Looking for deckhands at marine towing company.Requirements: ROCMC, SMVOP, MED A2 and ma-rine fi rst aid (all current)Tug Boat Captain- Looking for Tug Boat Captains at ma-rine towing company.Requirements: 60 ton tick-et, seafarers, medical (all current), and at least 5 yrs seatime working as a Cap-tain on a tug boat.

For more information about posted jobs: fax: 250-624-5473 or email:

[email protected]

PARTS COUNTERPERSON REQUIRED FOR HEAVY TRUCK DEALER- Ideal candi-date should be customer-fo-cused, have mechanical knowledge and have computer experience. Preference will be given to those who have truck, auto, or industrial parts experi-ence. Permanent full-time, varied shifts on a rotational ba-sis. Bailey Western Star Trucks Inc. (Freightliner) is of-fering competitive remunera-tion and excellent benefi ts to the right applicant. Apply by email only to: nhalliday@b a i l e y w e s t e r n s t a r . c o m . Please - no phone calls or drop-ins.

PYRAMID CORPORATION is now hiring! Instrument Techni-cians and Electricians for vari-ous sites across Alberta. Send resume to or fax 780-955-HIRE or [email protected]

RIVER FLY FISHING GUIDEAvid fl y fi sher, jet and drift boats experience an asset. Remote lodge in BC. Email re-sume and references to:[email protected]

OINCOME PPORTUNITY

EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.BCJobLinks.com

PROFESSIONAL/MANAGEMENT

DIRECTOR OF Public Works & Engineering, Competition #13-05 for the City of Quesnel. Please refer to our website at www.quesnel.ca for more in-formation on municipal servic-es and a full job description. City of Quesnel, 410 Kinchant Street, Quesnel BC V2J 7J5 Fax (250) 992-2206 or Email: [email protected]

SALES

FULL-TIME Retail Trade Su-pervisor for the long board/skateboard industry. Secondary school & Several years of experience in sales, specifi cally related to the long boarding/skateboarding indus-try. $17/hour. Please apply through email at [email protected], or v e r s a l a p p l y @ g m a i l . c o m . www.landyachtz.com

VOLUNTEERS

PEERS VICTORIA seeks a professional female computer technician able to start as soon as possible. The volun-teer will assist with software installation, complete hard-ware setup, troubleshoot prob-lems and complete other relat-ed tasks. Commitment is on-call as needed. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

THE CANADIAN Red Cross seeks a data management as-sistant to maintain and update its volunteer database. The commitment is one four-hour shift per week or two eight-hour shifts per month. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

YMCA-YWCA OF Greater Vic-toria seeks a youth volunteer aged 13-18 for the West Shore Organic Teaching Garden in Colwood. The volunteer will learn about all stages of the growing cycle, from seed to market to preserving the har-vest. Commitment is at least two months, two hours per week. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

PERSONAL SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

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M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES

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MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FUEL/FIREWOOD

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest fi re-wood producer offers fi rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/news-paper?

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RENTALS

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RENTALS

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TRANSPORTATION

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MARINE

MOORAGE

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CLASSIFIEDSTo place an ad, call 250-382-6189, online at bcclassified.com, or email [email protected]

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Highlight your business to 80,000 Monday Magazine readers each week.

Call Katey 250.388.3535 for more information

Page 14: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

[14] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/MondayMagazine

STARTS FRIDAY Check Theatre Directory for Locations & Showtimes.

FROM THE PRODUCER OFPARANORMAL ACTIVITY

AND INSIDIOUS

ONCE YOU’VE BEEN CHOSEN, YOU BELONG TO THEM.

DarkSkiesFilm.com YouTube.com/AllianceFilms

Facebook.com/AllianceFilms

Check Theatre Directory for Locations & Showtimes.STARTS FRIDAYFacebook.com/AllianceFilms Snitch-Movie.com Youtube.com/AllianceFilms

FRIGHTENING SCENES

VIOLENCE, COARSE LANGUAGE

ENTERTAINMENT ONE

FREE TO LISTEN 24HRS 250-383-6111

over 730 local members

Personals or Variations

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MEN SEEKING WOMEN

CARING RETIRED Minister, 70. Looking for a gentle, lov-ing, kind lady for outings and just doing things together. Re-ply to Box #7500 C/O Monday Magazine 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4 or call 250-383-6111.

SWM, 66, enjoys concerts, theater, art and life. Looking for female (53-65yrs) with similar interests for friendship and maybe more. Reply to Box #3434 C/O Monday Magazine, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4 or call 250-383-6111

MEN SEEKING WOMEN

HOW TO REPLY:For written responses, please send $3.00 and envelope addressed to: Box #_ _ _ C/O Monday Magazine 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4. Voice Personals members can also reply by phone at 250-383-6111.

OTHER SEEKERS

CLEAN ATTRACTIVE early 50’s male seeks full fi gured fe-male, 50-70 years who would enjoy receiving oral pleasures. Discretion assured. Reply to Box #2072 C/O Monday Magazine, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4 or call 250-383-6111.FIT MALE seeking 50’s wom-an with a zest for life, perhaps someone also living unfulfi lled. Let’s close the gaps. Reply to Box #3489 C/O Monday Magazine, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4 or call 250-383-6111.RETIRED MAN, 60. Looking for 1 straight male (20-40) needing regular daily oral sat-isfaction. Stop being frustrat-ed. Reply to Box #4113 C/O Monday Magazine, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC, V8W 1E4 or call 250-383-6111

Call 250-388-3535 Classifi eds

HOROSCOPE > FEB. 24 - MARCH 2, 2013Full horoscope online at mondaymag.com

All Signs: With five planets in Pisces many of us are visualizing the future

and reminiscing about the past.

ARIES MARCH 21-APRIL 19

Many of you have suffered with chal-lenges in relationships in the last few years. These partnerships have either undergone major adjustments or they have ended. This means that in the next two years, you are perhaps getting along with less support from others. You’re

standing on your own two feet. Even though this might be scary, consider it to be like boot camp training because in truth, you are coming to a career peak in about five years from now. So this pro-cess is simply going to strengthen you and give you confidence in yourself.

TAURUS APRIL 20-MAY 20

Around 1999, you started to reinvent yourself. By around 2005, it was vital that you established a home base that

you could rely on. After busting your buns since 2010, you are now book-ending the process that you began in 1999. It’s time for you to step out in the world and gain increased recognition for your efforts.

GEMINI MAY 21-JUNE 20

In the mid-’90s, you got recognition for your achievements. You felt proud. But by 2001, you were in a new sand-box, creating a new identity, which

was pretty much established by 2008. This year, you are entering a time of hard work. In fact, in the next few years, you might feel overwhelmed. But fear not, you will prevail. (For one thing, lucky Jupiter is in your sign giving you a major boost of good fortune and energy. Following that, increased earnings will reward your hard labour.)

CANCER JUNE 21-JULY 22

Around the turn of the millen-nium, you began to downsize your stuff. By 2003-4, this process was mostly complete and you sailed off into a whole new world, hopefully a little lighter. Most recently, the last few years have been a strong focus on home and family. Many of you made major renovations or residential moves to feel secure about where you lived. Now you’re entering a time where you might have increased responsibilities with children, but privately you’re asking yourself what you really want to do with the rest of your life.

LEO JULY 23-AUG 22

Although you’re focused on shared property, taxes and debt, in the big picture you want to solidify your home base by moving or repair-ing/renovating where you live. In 2003-4, you gave up a lot so that by

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Page 15: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

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2005 you could move in a new direction. This new direction completely redefined who you were. Since this is “behind” you, the big question is what are you going to do with the new you?

VIRGO AUG 23-SEPT 22

Although you were pleased with how things were unfolding at the turn of the millennium, right now you’re in a state of flux. Perfect. That’s exactly how it should feel. Since you set off in a new direc-tion around 2008, you have been redefining and tweaking your life to the point where it is now. This is a crossroads. In the next two years, you will either change jobs, change residences or both so that you have a strong sense of who you are and what you’re doing in the world.

LIBRA SEPT. 23-OCT. 22

You’ve been reinventing yourself since 2010.

Naturally, you had to streamline your life and let go of a lot of things prior to that, but now you are focused on cash flow, earnings and even major expenditures. You’re trying to make it all come together. An obvious question is what you do you want to do to earn your money? But at a deeper level, you are actually questioning your basic values right now. Essentially, you have to define to yourself what really matters in life.

SCORPIO OCT 23-NOV 21

This is a hugely defining time in your life. Older Scorpions can relate back to the mid-’80s because that was the last time Saturn was in your sign. Saturn is also known as the Great Teacher. Any Saturn transit is a maturing process. Saturn forces us to focus on responsibilities, duties, obligations that in turn lead to external success, rewards and

a sense of accomplishment. Right now you are beginning to redefine who you are in the world.

SAGITTARIUS NOV 22- DEC 21

You can’t ignore home and family! Major pur-chases, renovations, family meetings and visiting guests keep you on the go. Enjoy entertaining midst the chaos. But in the bigger picture, you’re starting to streamline your life. (In fact, many of you have already started to do this.) In the next year or so, you will let go of people, places, relationships, homes, jobs and possessions. Why? Because in about 18 months — around 2015-16 — you’re going to enter a new sandbox, which will be the beginning of you completely reinventing yourself and the world.

CAPRICORN DEC 22-JAN 19

Short trips, visits and errands create an acceler-

ated pace, but you love it. This is a good time to write, teach, edit, act, sell or market. This is also an excellent year to improve your job as well as improve your health. You feel confident and very much on top of your game because others are appreciating what you have accomplished. Later this year and into next year, partnerships and close friendships will be wonderfully enriching. In fact, singles could meet and marry someone older, richer or worldlier.

AQUARIUS JAN 20-FEB 18

This is wonderful time to wrap up financial proj-ects. But in the bigger picture, you want to play! Lucky Aquarians are on vacation, enjoying love affairs and delighting in the arts, sports events plus playful activities with kids. However, in the “really big” picture — we’re talking a 30-year cycle — you

are now entering your time of harvest. This lasts for about five years and most of you will achieve success and recognition in areas you’ve been involved with for the last several years or even much longer.

PISCES FEB 19-MARCH 20

With the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars and Neptune all in Pisces, it’s all about you! Retrograde Mercury will bring confused communications, lost papers, books, glasses and keys. You might lock your-self out of the house with the bathtub running. Nevertheless, you have much to look forward to because this year you will have a feeling of a richer home with more beautiful things in your home. In fact, many will move to a bigger home. You will also enjoy a richer, happier relationship with fam-ily members. Start planning for a big vacation.

HOROSCOPE > FEB. 24 - MARCH 2, 2013 Full horoscope online at mondaymag.com

CONTINUED

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MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com [15]

Page 16: Monday Magazine, February 21, 2013

[16] MONDAY MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 27, 2013 mondaymag.com

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Are you lacking spark in your love life?Valentine’s day, with its roses and chocolate may ignite a spark or two, but how is your libido during the rest of the year? For some people low libido can be a sign of a medical condition, but more commonly it is reflective of an over-stressed lifestyle. Many of us pack so much into the day that by the time we hit the bedroom, our only fantasy is a good night’s sleep.

Libido refers to a person’s sexual drive. It is influenced by physical, psychological and social factors. Stress is the biggest culprit in “putting out the fire”. When we are overwhelmed with stress and feeling exhausted, sex is usually the first to go.

Physical factors that can contribute to low libido include hormone imbalances (sex hormones, thyroid), nutrient deficiencies, pain, smoking/alcohol abuse, and medications such as antidepressants or blood pressure lowering meds.

Mental-emotional factors such as body image and self-esteem are significant influences on sexual desire. Relationship issues such as feelings of intimacy, trust and connection with your partner can also contribute.

What can we do?FOCUS ON SELF CARE Support your overall health by finding ways to de-stress. Get adequate sleep, enjoy physical activity and incorporate healthy foods into your diet. This will increase your overall vitality and leave you with a strong body to be proud of! But most importantly don’t put off loving your body until you achieve a certain weight. Love your body and the story it tells, at any weight or shape.

NURTURE RELATIONSHIP INTIMACY Intimacy and touch leads to the release of “feel good” hormones such as oxytocin, serotonin, and dopamine. Connect and communicate with your partner, make time for intimacy, and limit distractions like evening television.

FEED YOUR LIBIDO Many of the foods touted as aphrodisiacs have a nutritional foundation that contributes to sexual health. Here are a few to take note of:

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