MPD issue_28

  • View
    235

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of MPD issue_28

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    1/18

    ISSUE #28

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    2/18

    December 2010 /03

    CONTENTSCEOs Letter / 05

    Fiona Jenvey, Mudpies CEO

    MPD Sources: Innovative Shanghai / 06

    Innovative retail concepts from the Chinese mega-city

    MPD Meets: Amy Thompson &

    Doyeon Noro Kim/ 08

    MPDClick catches up with two promising young creatives

    MPD Hotspot: Seoul / 14

    Eight of Seouls strongest cultural highlights

    MPD OneToWatch: Brian Gathii / 20

    A look at the work of the British-Kenyan fashion designer

    MPD Focus: It Began in Africa/ 24

    An exciting new African art & design exhibition in New York

    MPD Look: Radical Handicrafts / 28

    Looking to handmade pieces for style inspiration

    06

    14

    28

    For further information on our products and services please visit www.mudpie.co.uk,email us at [email protected] or call us on +44 1794 344040

    Why not follow us on twitter: @mudpietrends, facebook: mpdclick street trends and linked in

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    3/18

    December 2010 /05

    Welcome to our28th issue ofmpdinsight. Wewelcome theNew Year bypublishing our

    Autumn/Winter2012/13 TrendNations Rising;a season of

    cultural remix,technologicaldevelopment andsustainable luxurywhere the near

    future will demonstrate innovative examplesof how technology, culture and creativity cancome together to create an augmented futurewithin our shrinking world. More on this canbe discovered in our trend books or our onlineservice mpdclick.com, while for readers ofmpdinsight we share some of the highlights ofour thinking and research.

    Culture RisingThis season, design inspiration comes fromAfricas cut & paste approach to crafts andtechnology. For marketers, the continentoffers a new paradigm for retail and branddevelopment in a consumer market that,according to McKinsey, will have grown morethan 35% by 2015.

    Certainly Africa is the next big marketopportunity after China, Latin America andIndia; according to agencies including WPPand Publicis, growth in these emerging marketswill offset other regions such as WesternEurope where expenditure growth is slowing.In this new world of opportunity the focus is oninternational brands such as Nike, as well astechnology; internet usage is set to increase300% between 2009 and 2012, providinga 2 way exchange between Africa and thedeveloped world. Finally, lets not forget theUAE; Qatar scored big time with its successful2022 World Cup bid, providing an unbeatablePR opportunity for the Arab world.

    Creativity Rising

    At a time when the worlds future points evereastwards, South Korean capital Seoul reveals

    CEOSLETTER

    Fiona Jenvey, CEO of Mudpie,

    considers the East as a haven

    for design, art and technological

    innovation, placing emphasis on the

    Middle East and South Korea.

    ambitions to be a hub of cutting edge creativecommerce and a city of design. South KoreanFashion Week has experienced an upsurgein coverage this season, although unusuallyit is their menswear designers welcomingthe majority of the limelight, including labelsGroundwave and Beyond Closet alongsideemerging womenswear labels like JohnnyHates Jazz.

    Technology RisingThis issue explores the new world of marketing.Here, augmented reality changes theconversation between consumer and Brand byamplifying the brands opportunity to interact.

    According to figures from ABI Research, themarket for augmented reality (AR) in the USalone is expected to hit $350m (218m) in2014, up from about $6m (3.8m) in 2008.In November of this year Airwalk used anaugmented reality app to launch invisible pop-up stores which sold a limited edition of the Jimshoe in New York and LA.

    The app, which directed people to the Airwalkwebsite, created the highest traffic in thecompanys history. H&M released a similarapp to enable shoppers to virtually try on theclothes it features in its shop windows, whileJ.C. Penney set up an AR Dressing Roomas part of their back to school campaign.Elsewhere, Tissot lets users print and cut outa paper strip in order to try on virtual watchesthrough its website.

    Tissot showcased the application with aninteractive Selfridges window display; YouTubeviews of the campaign have surpassed 70,000.

    This reportedly resulted in increasing in-storesales at Selfridges by 85%.

    Hopefully these ideas and examples will beenough to encourage creative inspiration withinour readers - enjoy the issue.

    Fiona Jenvey, CEO

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    4/18

    December 2010 December 2010 /07

    UNITED NUDE

    WHERE:HUAIHAI MIDDLE ROAD

    WHY:A PRODUCT RANGE OF INNOVATIVEAND CONCEPTUAL SHOE DESIGNS AREPERFECTLY PLACED IN UNITED NUDESSHANGHAI FLAGSHIP STORE.

    DESIGNED BY THE BRANDS CREATIVEDIRECTOR AND ARCHITECT REM DKOOLHAAS, THE STORE ENCOMPASSES A

    DARK-SHOP CONCEPT, OF WHICH ONLYTHE PRODUCTS ARE HIGHLIGHTED WITHSPOTLIGHTS IN WHAT IS MORE LIKE ASHOWCASE OR EXHIBITION, MAKING FOR

    A HIGHLY UNIQUE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE.MINIMAL FIXTURES AND DETAILS PLACEPROMINENCE ON THE CONTEMPORARYFOOTWEAR, DRAWING THE EYE WITHOUTDISTRACTION.

    AEGIS SHANGHAI

    WHERE:777 JU LU ROAD

    WHY:PROVIDING AN EXCLUSIVE ANDCURATED RANGE OF CONTEMPORARYDESIGNER & LUXE APPAREL AND

    ACCESSORY LABELS, CREATIVEFOUNDERS DEAGER KAO AND WINSTONCHOW AIM TO APPEAL TO A WIDEDEMOGRAPHIC THROUGH VARYING PRICEPOINTS AND STYLES.

    A MINIMAL, MONOCHROME PALETTEIS SEEN THROUGHOUT USING SUBTLECHANGES IN TONE TO ACCENTUATE THE

    VARIOUS ANGLES AND MATTE/SHINECONTRASTS FEATURED THROUGHOUT

    THE INTERIOR. HERE, THE DESIGN OFTHE STORE IS AS INSPIRATIONAL AS THEPRODUCT OFFERING.

    VINTAGE STAR

    WHERE: 268 TIBET ROAD MIDDLEWHY: THIS CONCEPT STORE, ENVISIONEDBY NEW YORK BASED ARCHITECTUREFIRM SERGIO MANNINO STUDIOS, PLAYSON THE USE OF ILLUMINATING LIGHT, INCOMPLETE JUXTAPOSITION TO THE UNITEDNUDE STORE AS DISCUSSED PREVIOUSLY.

    A BLANKET OF CLINICAL WHITE ISALLEVIATED WITH THE USE OF INTIMATESPACE, STILL APPEARING LUXURIOUSWITHOUT BEING INTIMIDATING. STRONG

    ANGLES ARE DEFINED WITHIN SHELVINGAND SEATING ARRANGEMENTS,REFLECTING THE DYNAMIC DESIGNS.

    TRANSLUCENT WHITE SHIELDS AREUSED TO CREATE ILLUSIONS, FURTHERSOFTENING THE ALL OVER WHITE SPACEWHILE FRAMING EACH PRODUCT.

    DUNHILL

    WHERE: 796 HUAIHAI ROAD

    WHY: CATERING TO THE LUXURY SECTOR,DUNHILL HAS ALL AVENUES COVERED INITS SHANGHAI LOCATION, FROM BESPOKE

    TAILORING AND FOOD, TO WINE TASTINGAND EVEN A MEMBERS CLUB. THE MENSPREMIUM LABEL INVITES ITS CUSTOMERSINTO THE LIFE OF THE BRAND, HOUSINGGUEST SPEAKERS, A TRADITIONALBARBER SHOP AND EVEN A TRAVEL &DISCOVERY ROOM WITHIN THE 1920SNEOCLASSICAL STYLE VILLA.

    NAMING EACH STORE A HOME, DUNHILLESTABLISHMENTS ARE MUCH MORE

    THAN A STORE; ITS A LIFESTYLE OFWHERE CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS CAN BEMADE, GENERATING BRAND LOYALTY ANDENGAGEMENT.

    BAPE

    WHERE: UNIT 3, NO.7 XINTIANDI

    WHY: THE JAPANESE STREETWEARCLOTHING COMPANY HAS EXPANDEDHUGELY IN RECENT YEARS, INCLUDING

    A STUNNING NEW STORE IN SHANGHAI.A CLEAN AND MINIMAL WHITE INTERIORALLOWS THE VIBRANT NATURE OF THEPRODUCTS AND GARMENTS TO TAKECENTRE STAGE.

    A DRAMATIC BAPE CAMOUFLAGE ISALSO FEATURED PRINTED ONTO THECEILING, REINFORCING THE STREETWEAR

    ASPECT OF THE BRAND. EVEN FORTHE EDGIEST OF BRANDS, THIS STOREPROVES THAT MINIMAL DECORATION AND

    A SIMPLE FEATURE PRINT CAN PRESENTTHE PRODUCT OFFERING JUST ASEFFECTIVELY.

    BARBIE SHANGHAI

    WHERE: 550 HUAIHAI CENTRAL ROAD

    WHY: CATERING TO EVERY YOUNGGIRLS DREAM, THE BARBIE SHANGHAISTORE WHISKS CUSTOMERS AWAYINTO A FANTASTICAL DREAMSCAPE OFSWIRLING DOLL STAIRCASES, ENDLESSMERCHANDISE, THE CHANCE TO HAVE

    YOU AND YOUR BARBIES HAIR DONETOGETHER AND EVEN THE CHANCE TO

    CREATE YOUR OWN BARBIE.

    THE STORE PERFECTLY EMBODIESTHE BARBIE BRAND; BY LETTING THECUSTOMER IMMERSE THEMSELVESWITHIN THEIR FAVOURITE TOY, THIS STOREPROVIDES A GREAT EXAMPLE OF HOW TOCONNECT CONSUMERS TO A BRAND.

    INNOVATIVE

    SHANGHAIThe Far East hosts some of the most inspirational retail

    spaces in the world, reflecting its highly creative and

    artistic culture. As one of the worlds fastest growing

    cities, Shanghai emerges as an international hotspot

    for finance and commerce while also housing an ever

    growing fashion landscape; Mpdclick hand pick six

    of our favourite retail interiors to be inspired by from

    Shanghai, China.

    Words by Heather Tuck

    Sources

    HUANGPU

    RIVER

    BAPELUWAN DISTRICT

    BARBIE SHANGHAI

    LUWAN DISTRICT

    AEGIS SHANGHAIJINGAN DISTRICT

    VINTAGE STARHUANGPU DISTRICT

    LUWAN

    HUANGPUJINGAN

    ZHABEIHONGKOU

    PUDONG

    UNITED NUDELUWAN DISTRICT

    DUNHILL

    LUWAN DISTRICT

    CENTRAL SHANGHAI

    DISTRICTS

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    5/18

    December 2010 December 2010 /09

    The strong contours and shell like qualities of thebody-encasing garments symbolise protection

    Amy Thompson

    We first talked to conceptual fashion designer Amy Thompson

    whos quickly becoming an exciting designer to watch, having

    designed for Black Eyed Peas Fergie and showcased at Paris

    Fashion Week in collaboration with Talbot Runhof. With an

    increase in surveillance in South Korea, prompting a strong

    sense of protection and security, Thompsons experiments with

    armour as an answer to this need for protection feels especially

    relevant.

    Having completed an MA in Fashion Bodywear from De

    Montfort University, your graduate collection showcased

    an array of sculpted silhouettes encasing the body

    with protective armour. What was the idea behind this

    collection?

    My original inspiration for the collection is based on traditionalarmour and the powerful exaggerated silhouettes they create. Inparticular, I love the complexity of the joints and methods usedto interlock the many layers and panels together. This inspiredme to develop my own unique interpretation of armour, using

    alternative materials and contemporary methods of constructionthat both echo and contradict the traditional skills of makingarmour. The designs that are digitally printed onto the bodywearand loose dresses were inspired by body mapping patterns andcomputer avatars.

    These represent the skeletal human body that is beneath thearmour in a contemporary format, highlighting the bodysvulnerability and need of protection. The strong, pronouncedcontours and shell like qualities of the body-encasing garmentssymbolise this protection; however, the translucency of thepolypropylene causes you to question whether the armour is justan illusion of security.

    How important is technology for your work?

    Technology is forever advancing and the possibilities it can offerboth inspire and intrigue me. I tend to find myself thinking Wowwouldnt it be amazing if I could incorporate THAT into fashion!

    Thats how I came to use Lenticular Technology within my latest

    OPPOSITE: AMY THOMPSON & DOYEON NORO KIMABOVE: SHOTS FROM THOMPSONS PLASTIC ANALOGUE MA COLLECTION

    Meets

    AMY THOMPSON &DOYEON NORO KIM

    Mpdclick cites South Korea as an exciting hub of emerging creativity,

    h groundbreaking advancements in technology and a rapidly growing

    pularity of new talent emerging from the region, we talk to two young

    atives whose work proves particularly poignant.

    rview byAmy Trayford

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    6/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /011

    Meets

    more within future collections. Before specialising in fashion, myprevious work at university incorporated traditional skills of handembroidery, machine embroidery and screen-print.

    In order to achieve a contemporary effect, I would try to branchaway from the traditional or predictable methods of applicationand perhaps apply the same technique to an out of the ordinarymaterial or concept, combined with something completelyopposite or random.

    My latest collection shows this more subtly, but the fusion isstill there. Traditional techniques used to construct armour werefollowed but instead applied using the contemporary techniqueof flat pack construction.

    You also play with printed textiles a lot in your work. Is this

    something that appears throughout all your collections?

    Having specialised in printed textiles for my BA degree it isdefinitely an area within my work that I have a great passion for.

    ection. I had seen some artwork created by Professor Martinardson, (Professor of Holography) where the images literallysformed as you walked around it. I decided to investigateher, and in the end actually got the opportunity to workgside the professor to incorporate into garments from my

    ection sections of specially designed lenticular lenses ofnotic patterns that spin and change colour according toch angle the garment is viewed at.

    rporating technology into fashion can often seemtainable, so it was extremely exciting to see how the project

    eloped and what could be achieved.

    innovation in your work is said to be achieved by the

    on of contemporary and traditional techniques. Which

    hniques in particular are these?

    background in textiles and applied arts has given me thety to confidently merge disciplines and skills within mygns and is something that I want to focus on developing

    t would actually feel very odd not to use prints.or me, it is a natural way in which to express myreativity and push a concept further

    my Thompson

    ABOVE: COLLABORATION COLLECTION WITH TALBOT RUNHOF A/W 10/11NEXT: TOP ROW - TALBOT RUNHOF COLLABORATION COLLECTION A/W

    10/11; BLACK EYED PEAS FERGIE IN AN AMY THOMPSON DESIGN.BOTTOM ROW = BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE TALBOT RUNHOF SHOW

    It would actually feel very odd not to use prints. For me, it is anatural way in which to express my creativity and push a conceptfurther. Using just plain fabric within my collection would seemway too bare and fabric bought with a print on it already wouldfeel as if I had cheated in some way and that I was stunting myown imagination. It would probably feel as if it wasnt fully myown work!

    I think the opportunity to create a completely unique fabric andknowing there isnt going to be anything quite like it is amazing,and in my opinion is a great way to bring real individuality togarments. Print will always be appear in my collections!

    How would you describe your signature style?

    I would describe my style as stark structured minimalismcombined with chaotic colourful prints. My work also has strongfuturistic qualities and for this reason caught the attention ofstylist B. kerlund who commissioned me earlier this year tocreate a custom made outfit for Fergie from the Black Eyed Peas

    which she wore throughout their futuristic themed 2010 E.N.DWorld Tour. (see above)

    The armour I made was based on a piece from my MA collection,but with more exaggerated shoulders and I created an intensecolourful print for the bodysuit as she wanted to make sure itstood out from on stage. The bodysuit was completely coveredwith Swarovski crystals so that it sparkled in the stage lights.

    Are you currently working on a new collection? Can you

    tell us anything about it?

    Yes Im currently developing my new collection. It involvesworking with polypropylene again as I know t here is still so muchmore that I want to develop. I will be experimenting with it evenfurther and combining more detail and pattern using differentareas of technology and print. You will have to wait a bit longerto find out more!

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    7/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /013

    Meets

    Mpdclick next spoke to South Korean Fashion Illustrator Doyeon

    Noro Kim. After successfully studying at the prestigious London

    College of Fashion, collaborating with the London Olympics and

    illustrating live at the V&A, Noro Kim serves as an exciting and

    inspiring example of this emerging South Korean talent.

    You completed a BA at the prestigious London College

    of Fashion. Your graduate final project entitled What is

    Fashion? And What Is Fashion Illustration? explored

    fashion illustration from various perspectives. What

    inspired this project, and can you explain it a little more?

    I found myself struggling to define it, denying that it isnt justabout drawing fashion, and yet there is more to it. I thought itwas interesting and ironic for me to be questioning what I havespent years studying, and wanted to turn all this thinking into apart of my work. I wanted to envisage the thoughts in my headrather than thinking about what to make in particular.

    Although I have built up a strong portfolio over past two years,

    I felt that there was still something missing, something that wasreally me. Then I started looking at things I wanted to achieve,not only in terms of work but also as in bigger picture. I startingthinking about What kind of project would I want to do if I wasgiven only a year to live? immediately I thought of road trips.

    So I began going on road trips, taking journeys searching forsomething without a clue what it is about. So many things

    happen during a journey, that you start looking at details andlearn to enjoy every single moment. This reflects my perspectivetoward Fashion Illustration. This notion of uncertainty within thecontext attracted me to go out on random road trips. And it hasnever ended. The journey continues.

    You are originally from South Korea. How does this

    influence the way you work and your initial ideas?

    I was never really encouraged to be creative back then. Believeit or not, the comic books I used to draw from, my mum alwaystore apart, along with my drawings. It kind of counteracted andI became more obsessed to draw as the act of drawing slowlybecame an escape or somewhat like a protest against obedienceand stereotypical perception. I was suffocating and searching forfreedom.

    Living everyday to fit into system and not to be an outcast makesme very anxious and I use these feelings as my drive to thinkoutside of the box. I know for a fact that I have to go extreme toovercome what limits my intuition, which is being afraid of losingidentity.

    In my final year of BA, I experimented on myself to get over self-consciousness by putting myself physically to an extreme state,such as not sleeping to cause my consciousness to weaken andto react slower than my creativity.

    The act of drawing slowly became an escape, a protestagainst obedience and stereotypical perception

    Doyeon Noro Kim

    How will the two-year mandatory military service you have

    to complete back in Korea affect and inspire you work?

    To live under rules will block all creative instinct, but Im in factlooking forward to it. Im seeing it as another unique opportunityand Im looking forward to see how my creative perspective willchange after the military service, I believe it will be very interesting.

    How important is technology for your work?

    New technology does inspire me but its never better thansomething handcrafted with ones sweat & soul. Yet it is alwaysinteresting to adopt technology and find a way to mix with handskills to create a new tool.

    What is your best memory for LCF?

    First, being given the opportunity to meet ambitious people thatI am still in touch with now. These people are so passionate andenjoy their life as much as I do, which I find completely inspiring.

    Second, the strong industry link which LCF offers, in my first yearI collaborated with the London Olympics (my first live illustration),and in second year I was live illustrating at the V&A. My finalyear exhibition was held in Carnaby St and more recently I haveconducted Fashion Illustration workshops at the V&A with BBCBlast. What more can I ask for? I think I have benefited fully fromwhat LCF offers to students.

    What are you currently working on? Can you tell us much

    about it?

    Im currently doing an MA specializing in Fashion I llustration. AsLCF doesnt offer Fashion Illustration at MA level, I have beengiven a chance to study independently, and I am trying to delveinto Fashion Illustration in every possible aspect.

    I am also working as THE PIG MAN in different events doing liveillustration performances. You will find me in the pigs head maskaround London outside, when it starts to get warmer.

    And finally, what does the future hold for you?

    Not sure. I love not knowing and trying to make the most out ofwhat I have now. And Im not so worried because in London,there are always opportunities and I just have to be ready to grabit when it comes. So for now, I concentrate on what Im doingcurrently rather than in the future. The closest goal I have forfuture at the moment is to set up funding to create a scholarshipto support prospective Fashion Illustration students.

    Mpdclick would like to thank Amy and Doyeon for their time and

    wish them all the best for the future

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    8/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /015

    SEOULoul is a dynamic mega-city in the midst of an architectural and cultural renaissance. Named 2010

    rld Design Capital, all eyes are on Seoul and all that it has to offer emerging technologies, a booming

    scene, trendy districts and thriving youth culture. Its light speed transformation from historic city to

    ittering metropolis that successfully marries traditional Korean values with a high tech vision of the

    ure makes Seoul the place to visit in 2011.

    rds by Jo Hatch

    Hotspots

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    9/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /017

    Hotspots

    3_THE DESIGNER

    JU YOUNG LEE

    One of the most internationally recognized Korean menswear brands, Seoul born fashion designer Ju Young Lee has been makingwaves with her edgy Resurrection designs. With a design aesthetic that favours masculine silhouettes, gender play, functionaldetails and a military edge, Ju Yong Lees Reessurrection brand not only appeals to Seouls fashion forward youth, but has alsofound fame with the likes of Marilyn Manson, the Black Eyed Peas and Lady Gaga.

    4_THE ARCHITECTURE

    DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA

    The Dongdaemun Design Plaza by architect extraordinaire Zaha Hadid is set to be the new culture centre of Seoul, with a designmuseum, library, educational facilities and 30,000 square meters of green oasis. The design integrates traditional elements ofKorean design and reinterprets them to create a contemporary space that blurs the boundaries between architecture and nature.Situated in South Koreas largest shopping and business district, the inspiring plaza is being celebrated as one of the greatestachievements of Seouls recent design makeover as it will create an important link between the citys vibrant and energetic culture,historic artefacts and emerging nature. The plaza will be open to the public in early 2011.

    2

    4 3

    HE ACCOMMODATION

    EOUL WALKERHILL HOTEL

    W Seoul Walkerhill Hotel sits almost cloudlike on the slope of Mount Acha, moments from the bustling Ganham business districtoverlooking the Han River. Ultra modern with high-tech finishes, a playful colour palette and boasting a Spa (one of the largest

    sia), Stylelab and Golf Driving Range, it comes as no s urprise that the hotel has featured on Conde Nasts Hot List. Discover thery boutique hotels Extreme wow and Fantastic suites for the ultimate indulgence.

    HE STORE

    LLERIA

    itecturally inspiring and home to major international and Korean brands, the Galleria Department store in the trendy Apgujeong-g district is the Mecca of shopping, attracting visitors as far afield as Japan. Renovated in 2004 by architect firm UNSTUDIO,store features LED illuminated catwalk-style walkways, luxurious immersive interiors and an exterior facade that continually shiftsshimmers according to weather conditions. This month, the Hanwha Group owned G alleria Department Store announced that itwon the highest grade of five stars in the Best Retail Development category for the Asia-Pacific region in the 20 10 International

    mmercial Property Awards

    1

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    10/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /019

    6

    8

    7

    Hotspots

    HE DISTRICT

    NGDAE

    sidered a symbol of Koreas youthfulness, the vibrant student Hongdae district is the centre of Seouls fashion, nightlife and live-ic scene. Home to Koreas famous art school Hongik University, Hongdae is the go-to place for discovering the latest trends.ky boutiques featuring fashion-forward collections, exciting vintage outlets (Divine Comedy, Joux Joux and Salon Yong) and artsys (including Giocat, a cat caf!) will keep you occupied during the day, while the night time opens up to Hongdaes many clubs,and Karaoke rooms.

    HE EVENT

    HEON INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL ART FESTIVAL

    ated in Songdu City, the city of innovation and sustainable design just outside of Seoul, I ncheon International Digital Art FestivalAF) is a platform for emerging technologies and art. Under the theme of Mobile Vision: Unbounded Aesthetics, visitors are ablescover the latest augmented technologies, dynamic architecture, generative design, interactive appliances and smart fabrics.ted in 2009 this yearly festival is a major event for those wishing to discover the latest trends in technology or simply to playnd with the designs on offer.

    HE MUSEUM

    LEUUM SAMSUNG MUSEUM

    cannot go to Seoul and not see the Leeum Samsung Museum designed by award winning architects Jean Nouvel and RemHaas, this reservation-only museum in the Yongsan district of Seoul showcases established and emerging artists alongside

    orical artefacts. The current exhibition, Memories of the Future showcases the work of emerging Korean artist including Jacksong, Gimhongsok, Meek Young and photographic sculptor Osang Gwon, in an exploration of trends in contemporary art. Thebition will run until the 13th of February 2011.

    HE MARKET

    NG & PLANTOON NIGHT FLEA MARKET

    u like nothing more than browsing through heaps of accessories and clothes whilst listening to the latest DJ sounds in a dynamic-hours setting, then the Bling & Plantoon Night Flea Market will definitely be your thing. Held in the trendy Platoon Kunsthale,

    ynamic space for subculture events in the upscale Cheongdam area on the 1st Saturday of every month, this collaborativent between the venue and club culture magazine Bling attracts hoards of super stylish bargain hunters. We particularly like theentric but stylish collection of second hand-clothing and hand-crafted accessories from Canadian model-come-photographer-e-stylist Chad Burton.

    5

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    11/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /021

    STREET SAFARI:BRIAN GATHII

    h Africas unique aesthetic forming a key influence for one of Mpdclicks

    umn/winter 12/13 trends, we take a look at the work of British-Nigerian

    hion designer Brian Gathii, whose striking designs take their visual cues

    m traditionally African iconography.

    rds by Jen Cox

    OneToWatch

    The dynamic landscape of Africa is etched deep withinthe global mindset; scientificbelief sets the dawn ofhuman evolution there whileits emblems, markings andcolours saturate contemporaryculture. As Africa enters a newdawn where the thriving ratherthan the suffering draw focus,its creative talents spearheada fresh identity, marking theexpansive continent as aninfluential cultural hub.

    Kenyan-born British designerBrian Gathii is one suchvirtuoso, spreading theAfrocentric gospel with hisown dynamic streetwear label

    To-orist that often drawsupon his rich cultural heritagefor aesthetic impact.

    Gathiis mission statementto create equilibrium viaopposites explains thediverse visual impact of hiswork as well as his ownpersonal journey. After eightyears ensconced within thevibrancy of his birthplace inKenya, he moved to the UK;young enough to adopt theconventions of his new home,yet imbued with the colourfulreferences and customs of hisown unique culture. A deep-seated need to create ledhim to study graphics at the

    London College of Communication where during his secondyear, in 2006, the ambitious student conceptualised To-orist, aboutique clothing brand formed on a backbone of artistic integrityand celebrating a range of cultures from England to Africa andbeyond. In 2008, despite the crippling recession, Gathii openeddirectional branded lifestyle store Cranium Tie in Essex.

    Decked out like a museum-come-gentlemans club, the space isstocked with high fashion and high design, including, of course,his own popular label. Marking itself as a must-have brandfor the modern consumer, all To-orist pieces are created withlongevity in mind, while a celebration of science tunes into themodern consumers desire for an intelligent product.

    Gathii explains his design process as an exploration of science andculture and staunchly refuses to accept full credit for the successof his collections. He humbly states that To-orist is merely aninspired point of view and a product of his environment.

    The capsule product offering of t-shirts, polos and sweaters is

    OPPOSITE: CLOSEUP OF ONE OF GATHIIS AFRICAN-INSPIRED T-SHIRT PRINTSABOVE: UK MUSICIAN TINIE TEMPAH MODELS GATHIIS DESIGNS; TO-ORIST CATALOGUE

    Gathii explains his design process as an explorationof science and culture and refuses to accept fullcredit for his collections success

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    12/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /023

    ruly artisan in ethos, each design is hand-rafted featuring hologram, cork, leathernd Swarovski embellished screen-prints

    ABOVE & OPPOSITE: DETAILS OF TO-ORIST GARMENTS

    racterised by bright graphic designs with a 1980s flavour.y artisan in ethos, each design is hand-crafted featuringgram, cork, leather and Swarovski embellished screen-s. The themes and concepts remain constant each seasone the techniques and applications provide variety.

    striking Masai warrior skull is one of the To-orists mostgral visuals harking back to Gathaiis African heritage; moremercially notable is a stark zebra head t hat comes in a rangeolours and applications, bringing To-orist valuable publicityng graced the wardrobes of a number of trend-settingbrities. British Nigerian rapper Tinie Tempah declares himselfof To-orists biggest fans and sported a complete ensemble

    m the band in the video and advertising for his 2010 numberdebut single Pass Out while fashion forward hip-hop

    cess M.I.A cannot get enough of the culturally inspired gear.

    cky-dip from history sees a veritable mish-mash of culturese it into To-orists iconic designs. The contemporary clashhetic is under-pinned by luxury fabrics, ancient processes

    OneToWatch

    and custom-made charm. Hand painted crocodile skin bomberjackets exude urban street identity whilst providing a desirablysubtle way to reference the growing vogue for African texturesand visuals. With the brand reported to be financially thriving andthe buzz around it ever increasing, there is no doubt in our mindthat Brian Gathii and the To-orist brand are ones-to-watch.

    Furthermore as Africa rises as a creative and economic super-power with the continents top eighteen cities boasting acombined spending power of $1.3 trillion dollars, global focuswill turn to the vibrant destination and its rising-stars. We expectan influx of Africana themes to grip the realms of design andfashion in the coming seasons as positive focus and an all outcelebration of Africa dominates the creative landscape.

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    13/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /025

    In an unassuming corner ofColumbus Circle, New YorkCity, the Museum of Art &Design is currently hostingan exhibition that has setout to blow apart commonmisconceptions about acontinent whose impact onour lives is enormous and yetlargely unrecognised.

    The continent in questionis, of course, Africa, and theexhibition, the Global ArtProject, represents a coming-together of a number of visualendeavours and contraststhat are eminently African.

    The Project is curated bytwo prominent academics in

    their field firstly Lowery Stokes Sims, the Museums currentInternational Curator and the former director of Harlems StudioMuseum. Alongside her is Leslie King-Hammond, foundingdirector of the Center for Race & Culture at the Maryland InstituteCollege of Art, where she was formerly dean of Graduate Studies.

    Between them, Sims and King-Hammond have collated avast quantity of pieces from disciplines as varied as fashion,architecture, painting and ceramics.

    The aim of the exhibition is simple; Africa, its children and itsculture are ultimately responsible for inspiring some of thegreatest artists, designers and artisans ever seen in the West.

    This exhibition serves to highlight that fact by exploring Africasvisual impact on the rest of the world.Rather than just a conventional exhibition featuring typically

    African works, the exhibition examines how culture has beenused as a force for good in the continent by revealing thestories of individuals working in the psychic and physical space

    The aesthetic variance across the pieces challengesthe idea of a single African identity or style,instead celebrating the diversity of its people

    OPPOSITE: GONALO MABUNDA, THE HOPE THRONE (2008)THIS PAGE: CHERYL R. RILEY, ELEVATION MIRROR I (2000) SATCH HOYT, RIMOLOGY (2009)

    Focus

    T BEGANN AFRICA

    ew exhibition at the Museum of Art & Design in New

    k City provides a look at the influence that African

    & heritage has had on the rest of the world.

    rds by James Samuel-Camps

    that is known as Africa in the world today. It also addressesproblems encountered by African artists; the commodification ofart production or the meaning and value of art in modern society.

    Around 200 pieces are on display, from nearly 120 people andgroups. The aesthetic variance across the pieces challengesthe idea of a single African identity or style, instead celebratingthe diversity of its people. After all, Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and its second-most populated, with around abillion people across 54 countries speaking 2,000 languages andpracticing numerous religions.

    Of the artists featured, many are not indigenous Africans, buthave family ancestry there; this allows the pieces to fully reflect thepervasiveness of African culture across the world. For example,Kossi Aguessy, a Togolese/Brazilian designer based in Paris, hascollaborated with high-end fashion brands such as Yves SaintLaurent, Cartier and Swarovski. If further proof were needed ofthe influence of Africa on Western design, Aguessy is it. Of theexhibitors, a mere two hail from Asia - Ramijabi Madarsahib and

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    14/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /027

    umbi Karimsahib, members of the Siddi Womens Quiltingperative in Karnataka, India. Both women are descended

    m East Africans who visited the area in various capacities chants, servants, slaves.

    ir contribution to the Project is a handmade quilt each,ioned from old saris. The rough geometry of each piece is ate organic and calculated, each fragment adding to a stunningall piece that is far more than the sum of its parts.

    me of the other pieces are particularly poignant a displayply featuring a book entitled The Boy Who Harnessed thed: Creating Currents of Electricity & Hope tells the story ofam Kamkwamba of Malawi.

    mkwamba had to help support his family as a teenager insteadoing to school and spent time scavenging materials to build admill that supplies his village with clean water and electricity.where, exquisite basketry by the Gahaya Links Weavingociation, a collection of Hutu and Tutsi women, is a symbol

    n many ways the Global Africa Projecthould be considered a poster child inerms of contemporary curation

    ABOVE: FROM LEFT - SAKINA MSA, FAST FORWARD COLLECTION (2010); SHEILABRIDGES, HARLEM TOILE DE JOUY (2010); SERGE MOUANGUE, WAFRICA (2008)OPPOSITE: ESTHER MAHLANGU, BMW ART CAR (1991); SIDDI WOMENS QUILTING

    COOPERATIVE, PATCHWORK QUILT (KAWANDI) (2008)

    Focus

    of peace and unity in once civil war-torn Rwanda. There isntmuch organisation to be seen at the exhibition; indeed, Roberta

    Smith of the New York Times notes if it lacks coherence, that isbecause there is none to be revealed.

    The pieces are loosely grouped around several thematic ideas,including the branding & co-opting of cultural references, theuse of local materials and the impact of art-making on theeconomic & social condition of local communities.

    In many ways the Global Africa Project should be considereda poster child in terms of contemporary curation. By bringingtogether such a vast and varying collection of works, visitorscan truly appreciate the subtleties of African design that havepermeated virtually all art & design disciplines throughoutthe world. Africa is widely regarded by biologists as being thebirthplace of all human existence; you would be hard pressed tofind a finer starting point for art.

    The Global Art Project is at the MAD until 15th May 2011

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    15/18

    / December 2010 December 2010 /029

    The artwork of London-based Italian artist Maurizio Anzeri isanother note-worthy reference. Never before has embroideryseemed as dark and suggestive as in the meticulous work of t histalented up & comer. Anzeri is an artist with considerable buzzaround him at the moment for his vibrantly-coloured, intricatelyembroidered discarded black & white photographs with adistinctly string art-inspired style.

    On the spring/summer 11 runways a collection of well-knowndesigners, including Kenzo and Christian Dior, provided a wealth ofinspiration for knit and crochet innovation. For Swedish designerSandra Backlund handicrafts continue to be an important part ofthe creative process and have become somewhat of a trademark.Her spring/summer 11 range combined metallic crochet andknit with weaving to create silhouette-enhancing forms. Radicalweaving from Impasse de la Defense and chunky embroideryembellishment from Dior solidified the textile art revival andproviding equally appealing alternatives to knit and crochet.

    The craft infatuation is also seen filtering into home and interiorsas designers such as Marcel Wanders with his crochet chair and

    Annette Bugansky with her knitted ceramics, experiment withhandicrafts to create furniture and interesting surface texturesfor homewares.

    As we near the autumn/winter 11/12 season be prepared forquirky layered styling and warm and vibrant colours in fashionand a homey, warm and fuzzy feel to interiors awash withcozy afghans and crochet taxidermy. Cater for the demandby merchandising crochet and knit-mix cardigans with crochetsquare print t-shirts and coloured skinny jeans. Finish off thelook with offbeat accessories, shearling boots, a woolen coatwith oversized cable knit collar and an old-fashioned crochetshawl for fun, on-trend autumn styling.

    After lying dormant for a short while, textile arts have

    erupted as popular hobbies once again, revived by

    a younger generation of crafters. This new breed of

    yarn enthusiasts have turned tradition on its head with

    guerilla craft movements such as the recent global craze

    of yarn-bombing.

    Words & Styling by Kiah Tulloch

    For autumn/winter 11/12 Mpdclick forecasted resurgence inthe popularity of handmade creativity in particular traditionalhandicrafts. As the season gets closer we notice a morerebellious edge to classic crochet, knit and embroiderytechniques, which have progressed into brightly-colouredartistic statements. We also see a growing number of artistsand designers using traditional handicrafts as their preferredmedium. This shift towards a more expressive style willdefinitely be key in influencing apparel, accessories andfootwear inspired by Collectivism one Mpdclicks trenddirections for autumn/winter 11/12.

    Also known as guerilla knitting, yarn-bombing is an eco-friendly form of street art which involves yarn lovers decoratinganything from fences and benches to trees and lamppostswith brightly-coloured knits, crochet and embroidery in a bidto add warmth and vibrancy to their surroundings.

    Taking the idea of yarn-bombing to another level and intogallery spaces, textile artist Olek (real name Agata Oleksiak)crochets anything and everything in her space, from textmessages to furniture and cars. Bursting with colour, Oleksreworked camouflage patterns are edgy and bizarre, creatingan almost sinister edge through such a homey technique.

    SKINNY JEANS FROM ARMAND BASI. SPIDERWEB KNIT SHAWL FROM

    TOPSHOP. SHEARLING HEELED BOOT FROM FRENCH CONNECTION.COAT FROM SPORTMAX. KNIT PATTERN T-SHIRT FROM PAUL SMITH.

    PATTERNED SCARF FROM TOPSHOP.

    RADICALHANDICRAFT

    Look

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    16/18

    For more information please visit www.mpdclick.com or contact your nearest agent

    Mpdclicks Trends area provides in-depthanalysis of real-time and emerging fashion,product and lifestyle trends. Our essential trendforecast for the fashion and home & interiorsmarkets feature the latest colours, textile &graphic inspirations and garment & accessory

    range plans.

    The Colour area is an essential start to theseason, providing key colour information fromleading organisations and respected trade fairs.Inspirational colour palettes, all with Pantonereferences, and galleries of images are availablefor fashion, homewares and sports markets asearly as two years in advance.

    Mpdclicks Trade Fair area keeps you up-to-date with our extensive coverage of themost important international trade shows andexhibitions; providing comprehensive coverageand interpretation from a diverse range of

    fashion, sportswear, fabric, design and lifestyleshows, and insightful seasonal trade fair trendoverviews.

    The Retail area provides a look into buyingtrends from cities across the world at a shop-floor level; providing extensive photo reports andtrend analysis of garments and accessories inaddition to specialised reports for sportswear,intimates, home & interiors, seasonal ranges andvisual merchandising.

    The Runway area provides thousands of imageseach season from the best international shows;including New York, London, Milan, Paris, SaoPaulo, Sydney and Tokyo. Our comprehensiveRunway trend overviews offer insightful analysisof the key shapes, details and themes from allthe major ready-to-wear fashion weeks.

    Keep up-to-date with an ever expandingcollection of fully vectorised and editableinspirational graphics, prints, trend relatedgarment shapes and clip art covering all agesand genders available for download in CDR,EPS and AI formats.

    The Business area provides authoritative andvaluable intelligence on consumer behaviours,business trends, financial insights and apparelsourcing developments, covering both influentialand emerging economies from across the globe.Our News area is an essential tool to keepprofessionals on the pulse of the fashion industry.

    Our comprehensive fabric reports provide youwith the latest in textile and surface design, fromthe worlds leading textile shows. With fabricshows a season ahead of the fashion sector,our PANTONE colour referenced reports arean essential tool for designing future collections.

    Mpdclicks in-depth coverage of the premierdesign, homewares and interiors shows acrossthe globe will keep you up-to-date with cuttingedge designs of the future. Mpdclick providesvaluable insight into everything from innovative

    product to colour, textile and print developmentsin addition to extensive architecture trend reviews.

    trends

    colour

    trade fair

    retail

    runway

    graphics

    business intelligence & news

    fabric

    home & interiors

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    17/18

    / December 2010

    Mudpies CEO, Fiona Jenvey, invites you to

    _Trend Seminar_Thursday 27th January 2011_London CollegeMudpies CEO Fiona Jenvey returns to the London College of Fashion topresent the Spring/Summer 12 Trend Seminar on 27th January 2011

    Fiona will be delivering four seminars on the day, the first two seminars will focus on the keynfluences for the Spring/Summer 12 season, covering the development from concept, inspirationsand moods through to fabrics and colours drawn from a wide spectrum, specifically from thewomens, mens and lifestyle markets.

    The Presentations

    10.00 Presentation 1Trend Intelligence SeminarSS 12 - Womens, Mens and Lifestyle100 per ticket

    12.00 Presentation 2Trend Intelligence SeminarSS 12 - Womens, Mens and Lifestyle100 per ticket

    Lunch (light refreshments)

    14.30 Presentation 3Kidswear100 per ticket or *50 if booked with presentation 2promotion code: kidswearpromo

    16.00 Presentation 4Students10 per ticket

    How to Buy

    Visit www.mudpie.co.uk, email us at [email protected] or call us on+44 (0) 1794 344040

    Spring/Summer 12 Trend Seminar / 27th January 2011 / London College of Fashion

    Tickets include our popularmpdtrends SS 12 magazine,normally retailing at 110which gives you the completetrend and colour analysis forthe season.

    mpdtrends magazine

    included in ticket price

    pedro lourenco

    a child of the jago

    miss grant

    Korea - International Textile Design CoLtdwww.itdco.come: [email protected]: +82 2-562-1250

    Mexico - Moda Informacin S.A. de C.V.e: [email protected]: +52 55 5280-5970

    Netherlands - AppletizerForecast, Colour and Information Centrewww.appletizer.nle: [email protected]: +31 20 530 5380

    Poland - Moda I Wiedzawww.modaiwiedza.com.ple: [email protected]: +48-22-7294156

    Portugal - Fatima Leitee: [email protected]: +351 22 996 1499

    Russia - Troyka Press Ltde: [email protected]: +7 495 6891313

    Singapore - Leng Peng Asia Pte L tdwww.lengpeng.come: [email protected]: +65 6746 2057

    South Africa - Mudpie South Africae: [email protected]: +27(0) 72 427 1161

    Spain - G.V. LinesEspacio de Tendenciase: [email protected]: +34 93 2651491

    Sweden - Colourhouse ABwww.colourhouse.see: [email protected]: +46 31 124456

    Taiwan - Linktrends International Ince: [email protected]: +886 2 25585100

    Thailand - Mode Publicity Asia Co. Ltd.mode...information Thailande: [email protected]: +66 2 651 4501

    Turkey - Ahu Barut - Neva Tekstil

    e: [email protected]: +90 542 232 06 33

    UK - Mudpie Ltdwww.mudpie.co.uke: [email protected]: +44 (0)1794 344048

    USA - East CoastOPR Incwww.oprny.come: [email protected]: +1 212 564 3954

    USA - West CoastThe Fashion Book Storewww.thefashionbookstore.comt: +1 213 622 5663

    distributors For distribution or more information on any of Mudpies productsplease contact your nearest agent, or alternatively, email [email protected] or call +44 1794 344040

    Argentina - International Textile Consultantswww.textileconsultants.com.are: [email protected]: +54 11 4704-6618

    Australia - Ginger Trend Consulting(New Zealand)www.gingertc.com.aue: [email protected]: +61 412841 105

    Belgium - mode...information Belgium bvbawww.modeinfo.bee: [email protected]: +32 9 2244387

    Brazil - Guelfi Representacoes Ltdae: guelfirevista[email protected]: +55 11 2909 2348

    Canada - Info-Marquee: [email protected]: +1 514 731 1011

    China - China Textile Information Centrewww.cncs-pantone.com.cne: [email protected]: +86 10 64 168245 / +86 10 852291007

    China - Guangzhou ChinaTex Info Servicee: [email protected]: +86 20 38852337

    China - Sixty Four S.r.le: [email protected]: +39 0587 466150

    China - Fashion Consultant Ltdwww.fchk.come: [email protected]: +852 2576 1737

    China - Creative Trends Servicese: [email protected]: +852 9378 5869

    China - Je Corporate Shanghaie: [email protected]: +21 65433207 / +21 55067263

    Colombia - Jairo Abril Y Cia Ltda(Bolivia, Ecuador, Panama,Peru & Venezuela)www.jairoabril.come: [email protected]

    t: +571 6120149Denmark - pej gruppen ApS(Norway)www.pejgruppen.dke: [email protected]: +45 97 118900

    Finland - Oy Urban View Ltdmode... information Finlandwww.urbanview.nete: [email protected]: +358 400 242 079

    France - mode...information S.A.S.www.modeinfo.come: [email protected]: +33 1 40 138150

    Germany - mode...information GmbH(Austria & Switzerland)www.modeinfo.come: [email protected]: +49 2206 6007 770

    Greece - Manos Komninos EE(Cyprus)Interfashion Expresse: [email protected]: +30 210 3639443

    India - The Bombay Subscription Agencywww.bsatrends.co.ine: [email protected]: +91 22 2381 9640

    Italy - Campaniaideedaprodurrewww.ideedaprodurre.com

    e: [email protected]: +39 081 3952823

    Italy - Emilia RomagnaEliotecnica Stermieri srlwww.eliotecnicastermieri.come: [email protected]: +39 059 691468

    Italy - LombardiaMede S.r.le: [email protected]: +39 049 9801451

    Italy - LazioEstile s.r.lwww.estileroma.ite: [email protected]: +39 06 8555337

    Italy - MarchePaola Tidei S.r.l.e: [email protected]: +39 0733 817514

    Italy - PugliaFashion Roomwww.fashionroom.ite: [email protected]: +39 55 213270

    Italy - Toscana - FirenzeFashion Roomwww.fashionroom.ite: [email protected]

    t: +39 055 213270Italy - Toscana - Prato

    View on Trends S.r.l.www.viewontrends.ite: [email protected]: +39 0574 623112

    Italy - VenetoMede S.r.l.e: [email protected]: +39 049 9801451

    Israel - Mudpie Israele: [email protected]: +972544358002

    Japan - Taiyo Trading Co Ltdwww.next-eye.nete: [email protected]: +81 3 3406 7221 Mudpie branded sales office

  • 8/7/2019 MPD issue_28

    18/18