MUFON UFO Journal - 1996 5. May

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  • M U T U A L U F O N E T W O R K

    UFO JOURNALMAY 1996 ~f NUMBER 337 $3

    V't

    CHART 4-5. DISTANCE FROM WITNESS252 Qualified Cases

  • M U F O N U F O J O U R N A LO F F I C I A L P U B L I C A T I O N O F T H E M U T U A L U F O N E T W O R K S I N C E 1967

    MAY 1996 N U M B E R 3 3 7

    MUFON'S COMPUTERIZED UFO DATA T. David Spencer

    ROSWELL DEBRIS RECOVERED

    OF FIREBALLS GOOD AND OLD Thomas N. Hackney 10

    HANDLING THE NEWS MEDIA Joe Lewels, Ph.D. 12

    NEWS OFF THE NET: LA CHUPACABRA David Adams 14

    ABDUCTION NOTES

    THE UFO PRESS

    John Carpenter 16

    18

    MUFON FORUM

    CALENDAR

    READERS' CLASSIFIEDS

    Gillis and Conroy 20

    20

    21

    THE JUNE NIGHT SKY

    DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE

    Walter N. Webb

    Walter Andrus

    22

    24

    MUFON UFO JOURNAL(USPS 002-970)

    (ISSN 0270-6822)103 Oldtowne Rd.

    Seguin, TX 78155-4099Tel: (210) 379-9216FAX (210) 372-9439

    EDITORDennis Stacy

    ASSOCIATE EDITORWalter H. Andrus, Jr.

    COLUMNISTSWalter N. Webb

    John S. CarpenterT. David Spencer

    ART DIRECTORVince Johnson

    Copyright 1996 by the Mutual UFO Network. All Rights Reserved.No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of

    the Copyiiglit Owners Permission is hereby granted to quote up to 200 words of any one arti-cle, provided the authoi is credited, and the statement. "Copyright 19% bi/ the Mutual UFONetwork, 103 Oldtowne Rd, Seguin, Tews 7S355," is included.

    The contents of the MUFON UFO Journal are determined by the editors and do not neccssan-ly reflect the official position of the Mutual UFO Network. Opinions expressed are solely thoseof the individual autliois.

    The Mutual UFO Network. Inc. is exempt fioin Federal Income Tax under Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. MUFON is a pul'liely supported organization of the typedescribed in Section 509 (a) (2>. Donors may deduct contributions from their Federal IncomeTa\. Bequests, legacies, dci'iscs. transfers or gifts are also deductible for estate and gift purposes,provided they meet the applicable provisions of Sections 2055, 2106 and 2522 of the InternalRevenue Code MUFON is a Texas nonprofit corporation.

    The MUFON UFO journal is published monthly by the Mutual UFO Network, Inc., Seguin,Texas. Membership/Subscription rates: $30 per \/ear in the U.S.A.; $30 foreign in U.S. funds.Second class postage paid at Seguin, TX.

    POSTMASTER: Send form 3579 to advise change of address to: MUFON UFO JOUR-NAL, 103 Oldtowne Rd., Scgiiin, TX 78155-4099.

  • ADVANCE REGISTRATION FORM (Please print or type)MUFON 1996 INTERNATIONAL UFO SYMPOSIUM

    Holiday Inn Four Seasons/J.S. Koury Convention Center, Greensboro, NCJuly 5, 6 & 7, 1996

    Name of Registrant.

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    RECEPTION (Friday Evening 6-9 p.m.) $10.00 each x = $_(Catered reception with cash bar)

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    Please make a personal check or postal money order in U.S. currency and mail to:MUFON 1996 UFO SYMPOSIUMP.O. Box 5149Greensboro, NC 27435

  • MUFON UFO JOURNAL

    Examining MUFON's Computerized UFO DataSection 4: Viewed Objects

    Part 2: Distance and Size, Surface and Colors, Emissions, Landings, and Following the Witness

    By T. David Spencer, Deputy Director, Investigations

    OBJECT DISTANCE AND SIZE

    Of the 585 reports before 1995 that claimed sightings ofUFOs, 514 estimate the distance. The object's apparentsize is given in 430, and 410 include the estimated actualsize. All three estimates are given in 281 (48 percent) ofthe reports.

    In 252 (43 percent) of the reports, the three mea-sures were consistent. That is. the object sizes fell withinthe ranges of possibilities calculated from the estimateddistances and apparent sizes. Having the three mea-sures, and their being in agreement, is a confidence in-dication for the measurements - that they were madeconscientiously. The distance and size statistics reportedhere are based on these qualified estimates.

    Table 4-4. Size and DistanceCounts of sightings for the 252 qualified cases havingconsistent measures. Highlighted values are those ex-ceeding 20 percent of the totals of both the column andthe row.

    ACTUALSIZE

    < 1 Ft.1 - 3 Ft.4 -10 Ft.1 1 - 30 Ft.31 - 100 Ft.101 -300 Ft.> 300 Ft.Total

    DISTANCE FROM WITNESS< = 20

    Ft.o

    31581020

    21 - 100Ft.

    121

    15153037

    101 - 500Ft.

    11T

    225018T

    96

    501 Ft. -1 Mi.

    0>

    0153522478

    > 1 Mi.

    036161421

    TOTAL

    4I IId581144510

    252

    Table 4-4 is a distance - size cross correlation tablegiving the counts from the qualified set. There were nomeasures of less than one foot when the objects were atdistances exceeding 500 feet. Similarly, there were nomeasures of sizes over 300 feet when the objects wereless than 101 feet away. In 27 of the 57 distances of lessthan 100 feet, the objects were larger than 30 feet across(almost on top of the witness). The ranges most fre-quently reported were distances between 101 feet andone mile and sizes between 31 and 100 feet.

    Distance from the WitnessThe proportions of reported distances from the witnessare illustrated in Chart 4-5. Except for star shapes, nonebeing reported within 100 feet, the distances for the sixprincipal shapes agree with the chart. Since an objectidentified as a star at a distance would probably beidentified as another shape at close range, the exceptionseems reasonable.

    AltitudeTable 4-5. Altitude and Distance

    Count of sightings for the 252 qualified cases havingconsistent measures. Highlighted values are thoseexceeding 20 percent of the totals of both the columnand the row.

    ALTITUDE

    > 500 Ft.< = 500 Ft.TREETOPLANDUnknownTotal

    DISTANCE FROM WITNESS< = 20

    Ft.001271

    20

    21 - 100Ft.07

    273037

    101 -500Ft.050422296

    501 Ft. -1 Mi.3925905

    78

    > 1 Mi.

    135102

    21

    TOTAL

    5287911210

    252

    The distance versus altitude cross-correlation of Table4-5 reveals that the most frequent sightings are close en-counters with objects that are airborne at altitudes of 500feet or below.

    Elevation AngleThe observed angle of elevation above the horizon helpsassess the object's orientation. Percentages of the data in15 degree increments show that over 60 percent of thesightings were at elevations below 45 degrees, with apeak of 27 percent between 15 and 30 degrees. Another25 percent were between 75 and 90 degrees. Peculiarly,only about 7 percent of the sightings fell in each of thetwo intervals between 45 and 75 degrees. Once an angleof 45 degrees is exceeded, people may consider the ob-ject they are viewing to be directly overhead, leading theinvestigator to report a 90-degree elevation.

    MAY 1996 NUMBER 337 PAGE 3

  • MUFON UFO JOURNAL

    Object SizesTable 4-6. Size Distributions.

    Counts of sightings for the 252 qualified cases havingconsistent measures. Highlighted values are thoseexceeding 20 percent of the column total.

    SIZE(Feet)< 11 -34-101 1 - 3 031 - 100101 -300> 300 Ft.Total

    SHAPESBoom-erang

    0001261

    10

    Disc

    041

    222513065

    Oval

    0O

    (I16244o

    48

    Sph-ere

    1341S '

    34

    21

    Star

    11

    T

    1

    1

    T

    0I)

    Tri-angle

    00I)4104018

    Other

    T

    1

    31247133

    81

    Total

    41 110581144510

    252

    In Table 4-6, which gives the distribution of sizes byshape, the following is observed:

    1. The sphere was the only principal shape that hadsize estimates across the entire range of values.

    2. Boomerangs exhibited sizes larger than the othershapes, the most frequent range being between101 and 300 feet.

    3. There are no qualified cases in which either aboomerang or a triangle was estimated to be lessthan 11 feet across.

    4. The estimates of size were predominantly between31 and 100 feet. (It is interesting that this range in-cludes the size of most airplanes.)

    SURFACE AND COLORS

    Viewed objects either have a surface or are shaped fromlights. Mostly, objects are solid and have illumination.The object's surface may be glowing or dark and mayhave observable features. External lights may be pulsingor steady. All combinations are allowed and have beenobserved.

    Surface Appearance

    Table 4-7. Surface Appearances.Proportions by shape from 586 cases having data (618data values). Values in parentheses are counts of totals.Other values are percentages by shape. Highlighted val-ues are those exceeding 20 percent.

    Of the 586 reports of UFOs, there were 618 claims re-garding surface appearances. Over 50 percent of theclaims said the surface was either dark, dull, or un-known. Dark surfaces were usually identified either by theoutline being seen as a shadow against the brighter sky,

    SURFACEAPPEARANCE

    (618)Dark ( 1 1 7 )Dull ( 7 1 iGlowing (210lMisty 115)Reflective (72)Other ( 10 )Unknown ( 1 23 1Total I %)

    SHAPESBoom-erang(30)501317010010

    100

    Disc

    (139)1414283

    21218

    100

    Oval

    (97)1510414141

    15100

    Sphere

    (62)s

    5750

    1003

    100

    Star

    (66)6o

    5100"1

    39100

    Triangle(37)528558022100

    Other

    (187i221723210323100

    by the area being visible from its own lights or groundlights, or by the surf