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New 2011 Nillumbik Trails · PDF file 2017. 7. 12. · NILLUMBIK TRAILS STRATEGY 2011 ii Recreation Trail Classification The draft trails strategy classifies regional, local and cultural

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  • 2011 Nillumbik Trails Strategy

  • NILLUMBIK TRAILS STRATEGY 2011

    Acknowledgements Nillumbik Shire Council acknowledges the contributions of many people who have had input into the development of the Nillumbik Trails Strategy. Council would like in particular to thank the Recreation Trails Advisory Committee (RTAC), residents, recreation clubs and organisations that provided input into the strategy. The valuable contributions will help to ensure a network of quality trails, including regional, local and cultural heritage which will provide for not only the Nillumbik community but also the community across Victoria now and in the future. Council also appreciates the extensive work achieved by the shire’s GIS Officers, in completing the mapping component of this strategy. Nillumbik Shire Council acknowledges the Wurundjeri as the traditional custodians of the land now known as the Shire of Nillumbik and values the Wurundjeri people’s history as essential to the unique character of the shire.

    Human Rights Charter Compatibility Statement In accordance with the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006, the Nillumbik Trails Strategy is assessed as being compatible with the human rights protected by the charter. This assessment is based on a Statement of Compatibility of the Human Rights protected by the Charter that are relevant to the Policy.

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    Executive Summary Nillumbik currently has an extensive network of recreation trails in a range of settings. Currently 25 kilometres of urban trails and 18 kilometres of rural trails enable people to be physically active and enjoy a variety of recreation opportunities in natural and cultural landscapes. The development of the draft Nillumbik Trails Strategy 2011 has been in consultation with the Recreation Trails Advisory Committee (RTAC), Parks Victoria and Melbourne Water. The strategy will guide the planning and decision making in the provision of recreation trails. It outlines Council’s key priorities for the expansion of the trail network and the proposed actions to achieve these objectives over the next ten years. The draft Nillumbik Trails Strategy outlines a vision that Nillumbik Shire Council will be recognised for the quality and diversity of its trail network. The network will be developed and managed sustainably while ensuring economic, heath and wellbeing benefits are provided to the community.

    Recreation Trends Data has shown there is a participation increase in unstructured recreation activities, including walking, horse riding, and bike riding. Trails can provide the opportunity to experience these activities across a variety of landscapes. Trails offer the following elements:

     the ability to deliver potential economic, environmental and social benefits to the community.

     the ability to serve multiple use purposes including pedestrian, cycling and equestrian.

     allowance for both recreation and commuter use.

     a quality experience that reflects the unique character and features of the trail, including historic, cultural and landscape.

     improved safety for trail users by providing off-road passage wherever possible and practicable.

     community health benefits.

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    Recreation Trail Classification The draft trails strategy classifies regional, local and cultural heritage trails, which reflect the experience users can expect on the trail. Regional trails traverse the shire and generally provide linkages to neighbouring municipalities. Local trails can provide local connections to townships and across neighbourhoods. Cultural heritage trails offer a unique insight into the surrounding environment and often reflect the heritage of the region. Once a trail has been determined to be regional, local or cultural heritage a further system has been developed in an attempt to match the experience with the landscape and subsequent design and maintenance requirements. The system is the Recreation Trails Experience Based Matrix. Six trail categories outline the trail experience, expected trail use and design and construction standards. The design and management of each trail category is based on Australian Standards and guidelines from both Parks Victoria and the International Mountain Bike Association. The six categories include: Bushland Trail – trails within a bushland setting, with a natural surface. Bridle Trail – trails generally through open pasture, with a natural surface. Rural Road Trail – on road trail, generally along country roads, trail surface consistent with road surface material. Roadside Trail – trails along road verges, generally in rural areas, with minimal surface treatments. On-road Cycling Trail – a trail route along sealed roads usually for experienced cyclists given the limited number of dedicated bikes lanes across the shire. Off-road Trail – a dedicated shared use trail, specifically designed to accommodate more than one use. Trails generally have a sealed surface, although occasionally where suitable these trails have a natural surface.

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    Future Vision The proposed expansion of the trail network will ensure a strong link is maintained with the surrounding landscape. The trails will be created sustainably to fit with the natural environment with the intent of ensuring an exceptional recreation experience. The trails strategy recommends an investment of $8 million in recreation trails over the next 10 years. Indicative costs have been identified for each of the recommendations within the strategy, with $800,000 in planning and design, $6 million in capital expenditure and $1.2 million in maintenance.

    It is recognised that a significant level of funding from federal and state government sources will be required to deliver the strategy objectives.

    The recommendations for capital investment and planning in the regional trail network include:

     Diamond Creek Trail – extend this trail from Diamond Creek to Hurstbridge, estimated at $3.5 million.

     Aqueduct Trail – determine development options for this trail following the establishment of land owner status, from Eltham to Christmas Hills, estimated at $2.3 million.

     Green Wedge Trail – formalise this trail which extends from Wattle Glen to Kinglake, estimated at $0.8 million.

     Kinglake Way - establish a trail from Hurstbridge to Arthurs Creek, estimated at $0.5 million.

    The development of each of these trails range from short-term, within 3 years to long term, over the next 10 years. A network of local trails has also been identified in the strategy, with both the proposed and existing local trails mapped. Local trails are essential in providing connections to townships, community hubs, sporting precincts and the regional trails. This strategy recommends expanding the designated local trail network.

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1 – Introduction ..............................................................................................................6 1.1 Background ...........................................................................................................................6 1.2 Report Structure ...................................................................................................................6 1.3 Strategy Rationale ................................................................................................................7 1.4 Purpose ................................................................................................................................7 1.5 Vision ....................................................................................................................................7 1.6 Objectives .............................................................................................................................7 1.7 Guiding Principles .................................................................................................................8 Section 2 – Defining Nillumbik and Trails ...................................................................................9 2.1 Nillumbik Shire ......................................................................................................................9 2.2 Nillumbik Shire Residents .....................................................................................................9 2.3 Recreation ......................................................................................................................... 10 2.4 Defining Trails .................................................................................................................... 10 2.5 Recreation Trail Use .......................................................................................................... 10

    2.5.1 Walking .................................................................................................................. 10 2.5.2 Running .................................................................................................................. 11 2.5.6 Horse Riding .......................................................................................................... 11 2.5.4 Mountain bike riding ............................................................................................... 12 2.5.5 Cycling ..................