2
840 was subject to epileptic seizures. The constable who appeared in the case stated that he held a St. John Ambulance certificate and could distinguish a fit from drunken- ness. The medical man called proved that he had attended the defendant for the past five years for epilepsy, from which she had suffered since childhood. The disease had become chronic and had affected the patient’s mind. Her condition in such seizures might easily lead anyone to believe that she was intoxicated. Upon the evidence adduced the Bench dismissed the case. The problem still remains a difficult one to distinguish drunkenness from some diseases. Any definite signs of a fixed kind would be a welcome addition to our knowledge. Sept. 20th. _______________ LIVERPOOL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) The Thompson-Yates Laboratories. THE Council and Senate of University College, Liverpool, have issued invitations for the opening by Lord Lister of the new laboratories of physiology and pathology, presented by the Rev. Mr. Thompson-Yates, on Saturday, Oct. 8th, at 3 P.M. Distinction for a Liverpool Student. Lord Lister, the President, and Professor Michael Foster, the secretary, of the Royal Society, have nominated Dr. S. R. Christophers, an alumnus of University College, Liverpool, as a member of the commission for the investigation of malaria in the British Colonies. Dr. Christophers is quite a young man, but he has devoted much time to work in the physiological and pathological laboratories of University College, where his career as a student has I been a distinguished one. In 1893 he carried off the Torr gold medals for anatomy and physiology, having ’, in the previous year won the junior gold medals in the same subjects. He was elected Holt Tutorial Scholar in 1895-96. Dr. Christophers will proceed to Italy without delay, where he will familiarise himself with the aspects of the disease in that country. Professor Golgi, of the University of Pavia, has kindly offered him all the facilities afforded by the Pavia laboratory for the study of malaria. Thence he will proceed to the Roman Campagna and later to Africa-probably to Blantyre, on the east coast. Dr. Stephens, of Cambridge University, will accompany him to Italy and Africa. His many friends here heartily con- ’gratulate Dr. Christophers upon his appointment. Hospital Sunday in Southport. Collections were made in the churches and chapels of all denominations in Southport and district on Sunday, Sept. llth, on behalf of the funds of the Southport In- fzrmary. The infirmary has lately extended its sphere of usefulness by the addition of special departments for the eye, ear, and throat, consequently the committee appeal for an increase of funds to enable them to carry on the additional work. The weather during the morning was all that could be desired, favouring large congregations ; unfortunately, in the evening rain fell for several hours, considerably inter- fering with attendance at church, and it is feared that the amount expected will not be realised in consequence. Liverpool Medical Institution. The first meeting of the session will be held on Friday, Oct. 7th. The President, Dr. W. Macfie Campbell, will deliver the inaugural address on Some Old Authors and their Books, with lantern illustrations. The President will entertain the members of the society, together with visitors who will be present in Liverpool on the occasion of the opening of the new Thompson-Yates Laboratories by Lord Lister, to supper at the rooms of the institution, followed by .asmoking concert. Sept. 20th. SCOTLAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Ambulance Associations in Aberdeen.. THE St. Andrews and Aberdeen Ambulance Associations have now been amalgamated. The title of the new body is , of formidable length, but its operations will extend to the counties of Aberdeen, Banff, Elgin, and Kincardine. Typhoid Fever Epidemic in -Aberdeen. A serious outbreak of typhoid fever has occurred in Old Aberdeen district. This has been traced to the milk-supply from two particular dairies which the authorities have ordered to be closed. 20 cases have already been reported. Sept. 20th. IRELAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Nursing in the Belfast Workhouse. THE Local Government Board have written to the Belfast Guardians enclosing a copy of a communication received from the visiting medical officers of the workhouse, in which it appears that on the date of their letter there were only 44 nurses for the infirmary for both day and night for 1500 patients, while the medical officers consider that there should be 82 nurses, of whom 22 would be engaged at night duty in order to abolish pauper nursing. The guardians appointed 15 probationer nurses on Sept. 6th, 11 of whom were to replace 11 temporary probationers, which will only increase the nursing staff to 48, while the medical officers think that 34 more would be required. Mr. Agnew, the inspector of the Local Government Board, reports that the proportion of trained nurses is altogether insufficient and the Local Government Board request the guardians to appoint an increased staff. The medical officers are most modest in only asking for 3 day nurses and 1 night nurse per 100 patients, and yet this demand repeatedly made by them has never been granted, and if pauper nursing is abolished they believe that 4 nurses for every 100 patients by day and 3 by night for every 200 patients will be required. The guardians are to consider the matter in a fortnight. Sept.20th. ______________ PARIS. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Bone Grafting. THE end of the holiday season is already evident by the improved attendance at the various societies. At the meeting of the Academy of Medicine held on Sept. 13th M. Berger read a paper for M. Ricard upon Living Bone Grafts. The first case was that of a patient in whom M. Ricard had supplied the loss of a portion of the cranium which had been removed on account of an osteo-sarcoma. The graft was taken from the ilium of a dog. Five years later the patient was taken into the Salpetriere with sarcomatous growth all over her, except that in the original site of operation there was no recurrence. That the graft had persisted was perceptible to the touch. It is well known that heteroplastic grafts often do disappear and are replaced by a fibrous growth so firm as to give the idea that the graft has persisted. It would have been interesting in this case to have radiographed the graft and also to have taken a portion of it for examinations so as to have had direct evidence of the persistence of the osseous tissue. The second case was that of a young woman suffering from destruction of the bony tissues of the nose. On two occasions attempts have been made to restore the shape of the nose by inserting a metal bridge, but the presence of the metal had always set up ulceration. M. Ricard split the nose in the middle line, separated the skin from the mucous tissues, and introduced between them the fourth metatarsal bone from the patient’s own foot. He then united the flaps over the bone. This graft caused no irritation, but the bone mass was eventually replaced by a firm fibrous mass, which, however, enabled the nose to preserve its shape to a certain extent, although, as M. Berger remarked, the nose was too short and thick. He considers that autoplastic grafts have no very special advantages over those taken from animals and is himself disposed to use the latter. Some Conseq7tences of tlae Heat Wave. The excessive heat prevailing in Paris for the last two

PARIS

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: PARIS

840

was subject to epileptic seizures. The constable who appearedin the case stated that he held a St. John Ambulancecertificate and could distinguish a fit from drunken-ness. The medical man called proved that he had attendedthe defendant for the past five years for epilepsy, fromwhich she had suffered since childhood. The disease hadbecome chronic and had affected the patient’s mind. Hercondition in such seizures might easily lead anyone to believethat she was intoxicated. Upon the evidence adduced theBench dismissed the case. The problem still remains a difficultone to distinguish drunkenness from some diseases. Anydefinite signs of a fixed kind would be a welcome addition toour knowledge.

Sept. 20th. _______________

LIVERPOOL.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

’ The Thompson-Yates Laboratories.THE Council and Senate of University College, Liverpool,

have issued invitations for the opening by Lord Lister of thenew laboratories of physiology and pathology, presented bythe Rev. Mr. Thompson-Yates, on Saturday, Oct. 8th, at3 P.M.

Distinction for a Liverpool Student.Lord Lister, the President, and Professor Michael Foster,

the secretary, of the Royal Society, have nominated Dr. S. R.Christophers, an alumnus of University College, Liverpool,as a member of the commission for the investigation ofmalaria in the British Colonies. Dr. Christophers is quitea young man, but he has devoted much time to workin the physiological and pathological laboratories of

University College, where his career as a student has Ibeen a distinguished one. In 1893 he carried off the Torr gold medals for anatomy and physiology, having ’,in the previous year won the junior gold medalsin the same subjects. He was elected Holt TutorialScholar in 1895-96. Dr. Christophers will proceed to Italywithout delay, where he will familiarise himself with theaspects of the disease in that country. Professor Golgi, ofthe University of Pavia, has kindly offered him all thefacilities afforded by the Pavia laboratory for the study ofmalaria. Thence he will proceed to the Roman Campagnaand later to Africa-probably to Blantyre, on the east coast.Dr. Stephens, of Cambridge University, will accompany himto Italy and Africa. His many friends here heartily con-’gratulate Dr. Christophers upon his appointment.

Hospital Sunday in Southport.Collections were made in the churches and chapels of all

denominations in Southport and district on Sunday,Sept. llth, on behalf of the funds of the Southport In-

fzrmary. The infirmary has lately extended its sphere ofusefulness by the addition of special departments for the eye,ear, and throat, consequently the committee appeal for anincrease of funds to enable them to carry on the additionalwork. The weather during the morning was all that couldbe desired, favouring large congregations ; unfortunately, inthe evening rain fell for several hours, considerably inter-fering with attendance at church, and it is feared that theamount expected will not be realised in consequence.

Liverpool Medical Institution.The first meeting of the session will be held on Friday,

Oct. 7th. The President, Dr. W. Macfie Campbell, willdeliver the inaugural address on Some Old Authors andtheir Books, with lantern illustrations. The President willentertain the members of the society, together with visitorswho will be present in Liverpool on the occasion of the

opening of the new Thompson-Yates Laboratories by LordLister, to supper at the rooms of the institution, followed by.asmoking concert.Sept. 20th.

SCOTLAND.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Ambulance Associations in Aberdeen..THE St. Andrews and Aberdeen Ambulance Associations

have now been amalgamated. The title of the new body is ,

of formidable length, but its operations will extend to thecounties of Aberdeen, Banff, Elgin, and Kincardine.

Typhoid Fever Epidemic in -Aberdeen.A serious outbreak of typhoid fever has occurred in Old

Aberdeen district. This has been traced to the milk-supplyfrom two particular dairies which the authorities haveordered to be closed. 20 cases have already been reported.

Sept. 20th. ____ ___

IRELAND.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Nursing in the Belfast Workhouse.THE Local Government Board have written to the Belfast

Guardians enclosing a copy of a communication receivedfrom the visiting medical officers of the workhouse, in whichit appears that on the date of their letter there were only44 nurses for the infirmary for both day and night for 1500patients, while the medical officers consider that there shouldbe 82 nurses, of whom 22 would be engaged at night dutyin order to abolish pauper nursing. The guardians appointed15 probationer nurses on Sept. 6th, 11 of whom were to

replace 11 temporary probationers, which will only increasethe nursing staff to 48, while the medical officers think that34 more would be required. Mr. Agnew, the inspectorof the Local Government Board, reports that the

proportion of trained nurses is altogether insufficientand the Local Government Board request the guardiansto appoint an increased staff. The medical officersare most modest in only asking for 3 day nurses

and 1 night nurse per 100 patients, and yet this demandrepeatedly made by them has never been granted, and if

pauper nursing is abolished they believe that 4 nurses forevery 100 patients by day and 3 by night for every 200patients will be required. The guardians are to consider thematter in a fortnight.Sept.20th.

______________

PARIS.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Bone Grafting.THE end of the holiday season is already evident by the

improved attendance at the various societies. At the

meeting of the Academy of Medicine held on Sept. 13thM. Berger read a paper for M. Ricard upon Living BoneGrafts. The first case was that of a patient in whom M.Ricard had supplied the loss of a portion of the craniumwhich had been removed on account of an osteo-sarcoma.The graft was taken from the ilium of a dog. Five yearslater the patient was taken into the Salpetriere withsarcomatous growth all over her, except that in the originalsite of operation there was no recurrence. That the grafthad persisted was perceptible to the touch. It is well knownthat heteroplastic grafts often do disappear and are replacedby a fibrous growth so firm as to give the idea thatthe graft has persisted. It would have been interesting inthis case to have radiographed the graft and also tohave taken a portion of it for examinations so as

to have had direct evidence of the persistence ofthe osseous tissue. The second case was that ofa young woman suffering from destruction of the bonytissues of the nose. On two occasions attempts havebeen made to restore the shape of the nose by inserting ametal bridge, but the presence of the metal had alwaysset up ulceration. M. Ricard split the nose in the middleline, separated the skin from the mucous tissues, andintroduced between them the fourth metatarsal bone fromthe patient’s own foot. He then united the flaps overthe bone. This graft caused no irritation, but thebone mass was eventually replaced by a firm fibrous mass,which, however, enabled the nose to preserve its shape to acertain extent, although, as M. Berger remarked, the nosewas too short and thick. He considers that autoplasticgrafts have no very special advantages over those taken fromanimals and is himself disposed to use the latter.

Some Conseq7tences of tlae Heat Wave.The excessive heat prevailing in Paris for the last two

Page 2: PARIS

841

weeks has had a markedly injurious effect upon the publichealth. In addition to the numerous cases of sunstroke

gastro-intestinal affections have run up to an unprecedentednumber owing to the water-supply being temporarilyenhanced by water taken from the Seine, the ordinarysources of supply being insufficient to meet the demand.Some cases of gastro-enteritis have been of a very severetype, death occurring in about three days ; others have beenmilder and very few Parisians have escaped an attack of thismild form. Every effort is being made to increase the supplyof drinkable water for the town and it is hoped that by nextyear water from Lunain will be available. Last week anartesian well was bored at the Butte aux Cailles. This well,the boring of which was originally commenced in 1864, givesa minimum supply of 6,000,000 litres per diem at a tempera-ture of 27° C. The water, which is very pure and appears tocome from the shell beds of the Jura, will be used in partfor a thermal bathing étabtissement and in part, after havingbeen cooled down to 12° C., for drinking purposes.

The -F’ire at the Central Pharmacy.A fire broke out on Sept. 14th at the great Central Phar-

macy in the portion of the building devoted to the machineryand the storehouses, where are kept the finished productsfor immediate distribution. It was late when the fire brokeout (9.30 P.M.), so that the staff had all gone. The patrolhad just been round and observed nothing unusual.The alarm was given by a workman employed in the dis-pensary whose windows looked out upon the dispensary. Thefire brigade, which arrived very quickly, were enabled toreport all danger at an end after half an hour’s work. Themachinery shop is entirely destroyed and the fire is supposedto have originated from a spark from an electric machinehaving ignited some shavings.

-Rabies in Paris.

Owing to the number of cases of rabies recently reported inParis the Prefecture of Police has taken severe measures with

regard to vagrant animals. M. Proust, at a recent meetingof the Board of Hygiene, expressed his approval of thesemeasures, which consist first in the application of the regula-tions of May 30th, 1892, and secondly in the application ofthe resolution that the owner of any animal which hasbitten a person should be promptly prosecuted. M. Prousthas drawn up a table of the cases of rabies reportedin 1897 throughout the department of the Seine.There were 351 persons treated at the Pasteur Insti-tute, with 5 deaths -that is to say, 1-4 per cent.In 1896 there were 2 deaths ; in 1895, 1 ; in 1894, 1;in 1893, 4 ; in 1892, 5 ; in 1891, 5 ; in 1890, 1 ; in 1889, 6 ;in 1888, 19; in 1887, 9 ; in 1886, 3; in 1885, 22; in 1884,3; in 1883, 4; in 1882, 9 ; and in 1881, 21. In 1897 therewere 17,700 dogs seized by the police in the houses of thepublic, of which number 17,241 were seized in Paris and 529in the suburbs. Animals known to have bitten people in1897 in Paris and the suburbs as well number 1826 ; of these1594 were dogs, 84 were cats, 146 were horses, and 2 wereother animals. 564 were in a state of rabies, 1212 werehealthy, and 50 were unknown. 164 adults and 58 childrenwere bitten by animals suffering from rabies, 742 adults and407 children were bitten by healthy animals, and 34 adultsand 9 children were bitten by animals whose condition wasnot certain. 787 dogs, 212 cats, and 3 other animals werebitten by rabid animals in 1897.

Sept. 20th _________________

BERLIN.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Local Application of Steam in Metrorrhagia.AT the last Surgical Congress Professor Diihrssen of

Berlin made a short communication on the Treatment of

Menorrhagia by the Local Application of Steam, and he hasrecently published an article on the subject in the BerlinerKlinische Woehenscrift. The method was devised byProfessor Snegirjeff of Moscow, who applied steam at a con-siderable temperature in a case of profuse hepatic hæmor-rhage after the extirpation of an echinococcus, and hesubsequently had recourse to it in uterine haemorrhages.Professor Duhrssen points out that a permanent cure ofdangerous metrorrhagia may be effected in this waywithout an anaesthetic being required, and that themethod is applicable in some cases for which severe

operations have hitherto been considered necessary.The apparatus employed is quite simple, consisting of aboiler which is heated by a spirit lamp and from whichsteam is supplied by a caoutchouc tube to a metallic catheterintroduced into the uterus, so that the steam from theboiler escapes through the eyes of the catheter into theuterine cavity. When steam has acted for one minute themucous membrane of the uterus becomes white and

haemorrhages generally stop at once. After four days a,

second application may be made, but not for more than oneminute, as the mucous membrane is liable to be destroyedby the prolonged action of steam. Professor Diihrssen’sfirst cases were three patients, one of whom was the

subject of haemophilia and suffered from menorrhagia soprofuse that her life was endangered, and extirpationof the uterus had been proposed by her medical attendant.In this case the haemorrhage was stopped by a local applica-tion of steam of two minutes’ duration, but after nine days atubular body was discharged from the uterus which provedto be the entire uterine mucous membrane together with aportion of the subjacent muscle. The patient had a secondhæmorrhage thirteen days afterwards, and on the twentiethday steam was applied for the second time, after whichno menorrhagia ensued. The exfoliation of the uterinemucous membrane, of course, produced complete adhe-sion of the uterine walls so that on examination someweeks later no uterine cavity could be found. The samewas observed in the two other cases. The method is there-fore contraindicated in young persons and of course in

hemorrhages due to malignant growths ; but it is speciallyuseful in profuse metrorrhagia at the climacteric periodcaused by chronic metritis or by interstitial myoma. Toavoid adhesion of the uterine walls in young patientsProfessor Duhrssen proposes to apply the steam for a quarterof a minute only and not to repeat it before the nextmenstruation. This treatment has also been employedsuccessfully in puerperal fever, especially in septic endo-metritis and in subacute and chronic gonorrhœa of thecervix.

1 lie Death of Professor Nasse.On Sept. 1st Professor Nasse, the first assistant of Professor

von Bergmann, lost his life by an accident. The deceasedwas an enthusiastic mountain climber and one of the leadingmembers of the Berlin section of the German Alpine Associa-tion. Spending his holidays, as he usually did, in the Alpshe had made the ascent of Mount Palu, near Pontresina, incompany with Dr. Borchard and two guides. When the

party were descending and were crossing a glaciera snow-bridge on which Professor Nasse was walking,suddenly gave way. The party being roped togetherthe first guide and Professor Nasse both fell into a crevasse.Dr. Borchard and the second guide also slipped somedistance, but at last succeeded in gaining a firm foot-hold, and both supported their companions by the rope.Unfortunately Professor Nasse had tied the rope round hischest instead of round his pelvis so that his chest was com-pressed by the tightening of the rope and his breathing soonbecame difficult. When suffocation was imminent the firstguide, hoping to save Professor Nasse by taking the strain cffthe rope, risked his own life and cut the rope betweenhimself and his unfortunate companion. But this sacrifice wasof no avail. The two men standing at the edge of the fissurewere now of course able to draw Professor Nasse out of thecrevasse, but he was cyanosed and unconscious and after afew feeble respirations he died. The guide, who will becomefamous for his heroic action and who has justified the old-established renown of the Swiss guides, fortunately escapeddeath ; he was found at the bottom of the crevasse havingonly sustained some bruises. The news of Professor Nasse’sterrible death was received with the utmost sympathy amongmedical and lay circles in Berlin, where he had a prominentposition as head of the out-patient department of the RoyalSurgical Clinic. He had made a good many contributions tomodern surgery and came especially into notice duringthe late Greece-Turkish war as leader of the GermanRed Cross Mission to Constantinople. Professor Nasseresided several months in the Turkish metropolis as chiefsurgeon to the great military hospital of that city. It wasa sad coincidence that on the day of his death the OfficialGazette published the news of his being decorated by theSultan in recognition of the services he had rendered to theTurkish wounded soldiers. Professor Nasse had twice before

escaped from imminent death-once on the occasion of a

gas explosion on the premises of the surgical clinic, where