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Part 16: Social and Collaborative Virtual · PDF fileSocial and Collaborative Virtual Environments Virtuelle Realität Wintersemester 2006/07 Prof. Bernhard Jung ... Email, bulletin

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  • Virtuelle Realitt

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    Part 16:

    Social and Collaborative Virtual Environments

    Virtuelle RealittWintersemester 2006/07

    Prof. Bernhard Jung

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    IBM Ups Investment In Virtual World

    IBM is set to invest $10 million over the next twelve months to increase its presence in the market for technologies that enable so-called virtual worlds such as Second Life, a 3-D Web environment in which people from various walks doff their everyday identities to assume online alter egos, a company spokesman said Friday. As part of the effort, IBM will expand its use of Second Life, which now has more than one million users, for virtual meetings with employees and business partners. Next week, company CEO Sam Palmisano will go "in world" to hold a virtual town hall on IBM's Second Life island. The company recently held a similar gathering with the press and analysts, and has hosted a virtual party for IBM alumni inside the online world. It's also building a 3-D replica of China's famed Palace Museum inside Second Life, which will be open to cyber tourists. IBM's virtual reality ambitions go far beyond Second Life, however, a spokesman says.

    [ http://www.techweb.com/wire/ebiz/193700609 November 10, 2006]

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Social Virtual Environments

    Virtual RealityReal-time computer graphics, audio, haptics3D user interface"Presence": sense of "being there"

    Social Virtual Environmentssense of "being with others"collaborative work, meetings, games, entertainment,

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Overview

    Conversation with othersGroupwareNew communication technologiesCollaborative Virtual Environments

    "Ubiquitous Virtual Reality"

    Further InformationJ. Preece, Y. Rogers & H. Sharp. Interaction Design Beyound Human-Computer

    Interaction. John Wiley & Sons. 2002. Alan Dix, Janet E. Finlay, Gregory D. Abowd, Russell Beale. Human-Computer

    Interaction, 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, 2004.T. Pfeiffer, M. Weber & B. Jung: Ubiquitous Virtual Reality - Accessing Shared Virtual

    Environments through Videoconferencing Technology. Proceedings Theory and Practice of Computer Graphics Conference. Eurographics, 2005, pp. 209-216. Available at: www.informatik.tu-freiberg.de/~mweber

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Conversation with others

    Various mechanisms and rules we follow to hold a conversationmutual greetings

    A: Hi thereB: Hi!C: HiA: All right?C: Good, hows it going?A: Fine, how are you?C: OKB: So-so. Hows life treating you?

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Conversational rules

    turn-taking to coordinate conversationA: Shall we meet at 8?B: Um, can we meet a bit later?

    A: Shall we meet at 8?B: Wow, look at him?A: Yes what a funny hairdo!B: Um, can we meet a bit later?

    Back channeling to signal to continue and followingUh-uh, umm, ahh

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    More conversational rules

    farewell ritualsBye then, see you, see you later.

    implicit and explicit cuese.g. looking at watch, fidgeting with coat and bags explicitly saying Oh dear, must go, look at the time, Im late

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Breakdowns in conversation

    When someone says something that is misunderstoodSpeaker will repeat with emphasis:A: this one?B: no, I meant that one!

    (also a case of deixis: this and that refer to the visible situation)Also use tokens:Eh? Quoi? Huh? What?

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    What happens in technology-mediated conversations?

    Do same conversational rules apply?Are there more breakdowns?How do people repair them?

    Phone?Email?Instant messaging?SMS texting?Video conferencing?

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Design implications

    How to support conversations when people are at a distance from each other

    Many applications have been developedEmail, videoconferencing, videophones, instant messaging, chatrooms, collaborative virtual environments, media spaces

    How effective are they?

    Do they mimic or extend existing ways of conversing?

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    What is groupware?

    Software specifically designedto support group workingwith cooperative requirements in mind

    NOT just tools for communicationGroupware can be classified by

    when and where the participants are workingthe function it performs for cooperative work

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    The Time/Space Matrix

    Classify groupware by: when the participants are working,

    at the same time or not where the participants are working,

    at the same place or not

    Common names for axes:time:

    synchronous/asynchronousplace:

    co-located/remote

    differentplace

    sameplace

    sametime

    differentplace

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Time/Space Matrix (ctd)

    differentplace

    sameplace

    sametime

    differenttime

    face-to-faceconversation telephone

    post-it note letter

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Classification by Function

    Cooperative work involves:Participants who are workingArtefacts upon which they work(e.g. documents)

    participants

    artefacts of work

    control andfeedback

    P P

    A

    communication

    understanding

    direct

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    What interactions does a tool support?

    participants

    artefacts of work

    control andfeedback

    P P

    A

    communication

    understanding

    direct

    meeting and decisionsupport systems

    common understanding

    computer-mediatedcommunication

    direct communicationbetween participants

    shared applicationsand artefacts

    control and feedbackwith shared work objects

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Time/space matrix revisited

    co-located remote

    synchronous

    asynchronous

    co-authoring systems,shared calendars

    argumentationtools

    email andelectronic

    conferences

    shared work surfaces and editorsshared PCs and windows

    video conferences,video-wall, etc.

    Collaborative VEsmeeting rooms

    CAVEs

    Second Life

    Hologram Messaging(still SciFi)

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Synchronous computer-mediated communication

    Conversations are supported in real-time through voice and/or typingExamples include video conferencing, chatrooms, collaborative virtual environments

    BenefitsCan keep more informed of what is going on Video conferencing allows everyone to see each other providing some support for non-verbal communicationChatrooms can provide a forum for shy people to talk more

    Problems:Video lacks bandwidth so judders and lots of shadowsDifficult to establish eye contact with images of othersPeople can behave badly when behind the mask of an avatar

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Video conferencing: wall, kiosk, booth

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Will video be a success using G3 mobile phones?

    The VP-210" VisualPhone: a mobile video phone developed by the japanese company Kyocera Corporation Source: http://www.kyocera.co.jp/news/1999/9905/0003-e.asp

    Will the judder, sudden jerks and shadowsdisappear?

    Will it be possible to establish eye contactand read lips on such a small image?

    Will people find it socially acceptable totalk to an image of someone in the palm oftheir hands?

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Asynchronous computer-mediated communication

    Communication takes place remotely at different timesEmail, bulletin boards, newsgroups, online forums, blogs, Recipients of email:

    direct in To: fieldcopies in Cc: field

    delivery identical difference is social purposeBenefits include:

    Read any place any timeFlexible as to how to deal with itPowerful, can send to many peopleCan make saying things easier

    Problems include:FLAMING!!!SpammingMessage overloadFalse expectations as to when people will reply

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    txt is gr8

    instant messaging1996 ICQ small companynow millionsmore like conversation

    SMSpeople adapt their communication styles to medium

    y is it we al lv shrt msgsoriginally a feature of internal management protocolshort messages (160 chars) and text with numbersno-one predicted mass adoption!!now phones with cameras for MMS

    Hi, u there

    want to meet later

    yeh, had a good night last night?uhu

    Prof. B. Jung Virtuelle Realitt, WS 2006/07

    Computer-mediated communication combined with other activity: Meeting and decision support systems

    In design, management, and research, we want to:generate ideasdevelop ideasrecord ideas

    Primary emphasis: common understanding

    Three types of systemsargumentation tools

    asynchronous co-locatedrecording the arguments for design decisions

    meeting roomssynchronous co-locatedelectronic support for face-to-face meetings

    shared drawing surfacessynchronous remoteshared drawing board at a distance

    ArgTool

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    Prof. B. Jung Virtuell

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