Pedagogical Plan_EdithPaillat

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  • Almost French, virtually Situated Language Practice through Global Simulation

    Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................... 2

    Theoretical framework .................................................................................................................................... 2

    On Situated learning Design ........................................................................................................................ 3

    On Global Simulation and Task Based Language Teaching (TBLT) .............................................................. 3

    On Motivation, Affect and Reflection ......................................................................................................... 4

    On Virtual Worlds (VW) and Digital Game Based Learning (DGBL) ............................................................ 5

    Pedagogical Framework .................................................................................................................................. 5

    Project background ..................................................................................................................................... 5

    Project description ...................................................................................................................................... 7

    SECTIONS Framework .............................................................................................................................. 7

    Students: ................................................................................................................................................. 7

    Ease of use/Usability: .............................................................................................................................. 8

    Costs / time ............................................................................................................................................. 8

    Teaching: ................................................................................................................................................. 8

    Interactivity: .......................................................................................................................................... 10

    Organisational considerations: ............................................................................................................. 10

    Networking ........................................................................................................................................... 10

    Security and Privacy .............................................................................................................................. 10

    Project Evaluation through Feedback ....................................................................................................... 10

    Project Evaluation through Assessment ................................................................................................... 11

    Impact through Comparative Evaluation with other courses/students results ...................................... 12

    Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................................... 12

    References ..................................................................................................................................................... 13

    Appendices .................................................................................................................................................... 15

  • Almost French, virtually: Situated Language Practice through Global Simulation

    EDITH PAILLAT 2

    Our schools give students game manuals (geology text) without the

    game (geology) but it is the game that gives embodied and situated (i.e.

    useful) meaning to the words in the text.(Gee, 2011, p.117)

    Introduction

    Despite the vast amount of research in the field of Second Language Acquisition and following the works

    of Piaget (cognitive-constructivism), Vygotsky (socio-constructivism and Zone of Proximal Development),

    and situated learning advocators (Barab, Hay, Barnett & Squire, 2001; Brown & Duguid, 1989, Young, 1993),

    Gees statement above (2011 and 2007, p.105-128) appears to indicate a common discrepancy in education

    between what and how we teach, and how students learn best. It also calls upon situated learning principles

    explored by Lave and Wenger (1991), Brown and Duguid (1989); Young (1995), Herrington (2006). When

    students are given concepts, rules, functions and conventions with no opportunities to play and take risks,

    learning outcomes will peak at the conventional stage at its best. This leads to the question of what

    expertise do we want students to conquer? The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages

    (CEFR) provides useful guidelines as to what proficiency learners should attain in writing, reading, listening

    and speaking from real beginners (A1) to native fluency (C2).

    Gees statement leads to a second observation about motivation to learn: if students dont understand why

    they are doing what they are given to do, and get few (or no) opportunity to play with forms and functions

    in authentic communication situations, why should they learn beyond the basic extrinsic reasons to pass

    the test? (Lave, 1991; Young 1993). Barab, Hay, Barnett & Squire (2001) state that Learning, () is not the

    acquisition of facts and skills, but an activity involving the appropriation and construction of socially

    negotiated practices, understanding, and meanings.

    The project presented below seeks to address the above in order to bridge the language forms and

    functions learnt in class to authentic natural language production, thereby encourage language students

    participation in class, and enhance their learning experience with tasks pertinent to the realities of

    communication in the target language. For this purpose, we will use the concept of lImmeuble, a global

    simulation (Debyser, 1996; Magnin, 1997; Levine, 2004, & Dupuy, 2006) set in a 3D immersive environment

    where students will interact with the world and with others through an avatar. The project will attempt to

    explore the viability of situated learning approach (Herrington, 2006 ; Herrington, Parker & Boase-Jelinek,

    2014) using the affordances of virtual worlds as a visual response to the need for authentic tasks situated

    in an authentic environment (Ellis, 2003; Herrington, 2006) with regular reflective tasks recorded in cloud-

    based documents (learning journals, group wiki and Google Docs). Kolb (1984, p.21) considers that learning

    should be viewed as combining experience, perception, cognition and behavior.

    Theoretical framework

    Despite their efforts to encourage students in fulfilling tasks, teaching staff at Victoria often report that

    students tend to overlook their homework, find it hard to participate spontaneously in class and do not

    respond well to unplanned activities. However, authentic communication occurs in the real world. Tutors

    currently end up having to fill in many silent gaps throughout tutorials while students should ideally

    perform roughly 75- 85% talking time with their peers and tutor, or through voice recording. Oral outcomes

    tend to result in rote learning production with oral presentations often learnt by heart or with extensive

  • Almost French, virtually: Situated Language Practice through Global Simulation

    EDITH PAILLAT 3

    use of notes when permitted, which defeats the purpose of higher order language learning. That is to

    participate in their learning process and of the learning content, students need to unleash their own voice

    in the Target Language (Barab, et al., 2001).

    On Situated learning Design

    Barab et al. strongly endorse the concept of Participatory Learning Environments (PLEs, Lave, 1991) as rich

    environments that encourage explanation and discovery, nurture reflection, and support students in the

    carrying out of practices that embody personally meaningful and practically functional representations,

    and the activity theory proposed by Lave (1991). In terms of authenticity in e-learning environments,

    Herrington (2006) and Herrington, Parker, Boase-Jelinek (2014) strongly advocate the works of Brown &

    Duguid (1989) on cognitive apprenticeship and posit nine principles grounded in the situated learning

    approach: that is to introduce authentic contexts to reflect real-life situations with authentic tasks, provide

    access to expert performance and offer multiple perspectives to transfer what is learnt in contexts outside

    the classroom. Herrington et al.s posit also insists on the importance of instructors presence as a coach

    orchestrating collaborative projects and facilitating reflection so students can forge opinions on what and

    how they are learning. Students should then be able to articulate and defend their position as part of what

    the authors call authentic assessment which should be seamlessly integrated in the activity/task itself.

    This project aims to follow the Situated Learning Design framework proposed by Young (1993). The four

    main tasks for the designer are to:

    1. generate the right learning situations affording deep, meaningful and collab