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Poetic Terminology

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Poetic Terminology. Words commonly used in poetry…. A Poem is…. …a group of words grouped together to express a mood or message. Types of poetry include…. Narrative poems tell a story Out of the Dust Love That Dog Lyric poems express a feeling Roses are red Violets are blue - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Poetic Terminology

  • Poetic TerminologyWords commonly used in poetry

  • A Poem isa group of words grouped together to express a mood or message

  • Types of poetry include

    Narrative poems tell a storyOut of the DustLove That Dog

    Lyric poems express a feelingRoses are redViolets are blueSugar is sweetAnd so are you.

  • Each poem has a moodMood =tone = feelings.

  • Poems are arrangedA row of words is one line.

    A group of related lines is a stanza.Think: Paragraph in poetry

    Please feed mebegged the bee.

    Not on your life!Replied his wife.

    Mr. Bee buzzed awayWith an annoyed display.

  • Writers want their readers to have a multi-sensory experience.

  • Figurative language appeals to our senses and adds interest.

  • Similes and metaphorsSimiles use the words like or as to compare two thingsYour hair looks like a birds nest.

    Metaphors directly compare two things. Words often includedare: is, was, were, and are.

    Your hair is a birds nest.

  • PersonificationGives non-human objects abilities/qualities that only humans can feel or do.

  • The wind whispered my name.

  • HyperbolesAre extreme exaggerationsExample, After skipping breakfast, Meghan groaned, Im starving to death!.

  • Simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, or onomatopoeia?

    The wind pushed me down the street and slammed me up against the wall!

  • Simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, or onomatopoeia?

  • Simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, or onomatopoeia?

    Im bringing my guns!

  • Simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, or onomatopoeia?

    The window crackled and cracked after it was hit by Tommys hard drive.

  • Simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, or onomatopoeia?

    The snow looks like a blanket laying across the yard.