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Population Management. Florida Panther Florida Panther Distribution

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  • Slide 1
  • Population Management
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  • Florida Panther
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  • Florida Panther Distribution
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  • Panther Road Sign and Underpass
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  • Wildlife Overpass Banff NP, Canada
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  • Wildlife Overpass Catalonia, Spain
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  • Wildlife Overpass Netherlands
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  • Red Crab Crossing - Australia
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  • Grate at Entrance to Bat Cave
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  • Population management Limiting risks to populations
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  • Feral Cat - Galapagos
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  • Feral Cat Trapping
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  • Piping Plover
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  • Piping Plover Breeding Range
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  • Moonstone Beach, RI
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  • Piping Plover Protection
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  • Feral pig in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
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  • Pig fence Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
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  • Robbins Cinquefoil
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  • Robbins Cinquefoil Habitat - White Mountains, New Hampshire
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  • Robbins Cinquefoil Protection
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  • Black Locust
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  • Managing vs. Manipulating Populations Managing populations - controlling the environment (biological and physical) around the population and trying to ensure that the population has what it needs to survive in that environment Manipulating a population is a more direct intervention - usually manipulating a population indicates a high level of human-population contact, often with humans directly handling the individuals in the population
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  • Saving Species In terms of saving species, there are no hopeless cases, there are only difficult cases and people without hope. - Michael Soule
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  • New Zealand
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  • Giant Weta
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  • Giant Weta And Biologist
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  • Kiwi
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  • Kiwi and egg
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  • Kakapo
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  • Kakapo and Biologist
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  • Takahe
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  • Takahe and chick
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  • Desert Bighorn Sheep
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  • Whitetail Deer
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  • Wild Turkey
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  • Wood Duck
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  • When reintroducing animals, we have learned that: 1. larger founder populations are more successful 2. habitat suitability is important 3. increased number and sizes of clutches (litters) enhances success of establishment 4. herbivores are more successfully established than carnivores 5. competing species in an area may prevent successful establishment
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  • Reintroductions more successful when: organisms must be translocated into undegraded habitat; substantial numbers of individuals must be reintroduced - often many of them over a long period of time; careful husbandry of the species may be required - providing food, water or controlling species which may have a negative effect on the species
  • Slide 43
  • Przewalskis Horse or Takh
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  • Przewalskis horse reserves Mongolia and Uzbekistan
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  • Restoration of desert streams and fish populations BeforeAfter
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  • 1996 Montana Wolf Reintroduction Protest
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  • Yellowstone Wolf Pack Locations
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  • Yellowstone Wolf
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  • Yellowstone Wolf Prey
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  • Idaho Wolf Release - 1996
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  • Current Wolf Distribution ID, WY, MT
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  • Wolf Population Growth
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  • Desert Tortoise
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  • Desert Tortoise Habitat
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  • Pacific Salmon Species
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  • Peregrine Falcon British subspecies - peregrinus
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  • Peregrine Falcon Alaskan coastal subspecies - pealei
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  • Peregrine Falcon Range Map
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  • Ecosystem Management And Preservation
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  • Ecosystem Preservation Boreal Forests, etc.
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  • Semi-Natural Ecosystems Ecosystems that have been modified by some human activities such as logging, fishing and grazing but which are still dominated by native species
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  • Early Conservation Efforts 3000 YA Ikhnaton sets aside land for game preserve Asoka 272-232 BCE declared some animals cant be killed, forests not burned
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  • Modern National Parks Yellowstone N.P. - 1872
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  • Hayden survey of Yellowstone 1870
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  • Yellowstone National Park Army Bike Patrol
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  • Reserves Reserves any natural or semi-natural ecosystem that is protected from most forms of human use - however, we must remember that reserves go by several different names - national parks, refuges, national monuments, national wilderness areas, preserves and more
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  • Reserve Selection Reserves are developed by a variety of mechanisms: 1.Government action usually at a national level, but may happen at regional or local level as well 2.Land purchases by private individuals and conservation organizations (such as The Nature Conservancy) 3.Actions of indigenous peoples and traditional societies 4.Development of biological field stations usually combine biodiversity protection and research with education
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  • Grand Canyon
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  • Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
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  • Houston Toad
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  • Creating Preserves Creating new reserves requires the following steps: 1.Identifying priorities for conservation 2.Determining those areas of each country that should be protected to meet conservation priorities 3.Linking new protected areas to existing conservation networks, using techniques such as gap analysis
  • Slide 81
  • Setting Priorities 1. Distinctiveness (or irrereplaceability) an ecosystem that consists of primarily rare or endemic species or that has other unusual attributes (scenic value, geological features) is given highest priority 2.Endangerment (or vulnerability) species in danger of extinction are of greater concern than those that are not 3.Utility species that have present or potential value to people are given more conservation priority than species of no obvious use to people
  • Slide 82
  • Distinctive Ecosystem Peat Bogs
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  • Rarity European Bison
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  • Utility wild apple Kazakhstan
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  • Determining which areas should be protected 1. The Species Approach focus on focal species (indicators, flagship or umbrella species) 2.The Ecosystem approach save enough representatives of each ecosystem (at least 10%) can save most biodiversity 3.The Hotspot Approach save areas that have high numbers of species especially rare or endemic species
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  • Indicator species Freshwater mussels
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  • Ecosystem Classification
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  • Ponderosa Pine Forest
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  • Hotspots Hot spots or centers of diversity are areas with high levels of species diversity and usually also high levels of endemism thus become key areas to preserve at least 34 global hotspots have been identified
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  • Continental U.S. Biodiversity Hotspots
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  • Protected Areas in the U.S.
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  • Hotspots and Protected Areas in the U.S.
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  • Hotspots on Mt. Mulanje, Malawi
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  • Habitat Occupied and Reserves for Hawaiian Finches
  • Slide 98
  • Rare and Endangered Species in the US Andy Dobson examined the distributions of 900 rare and endangered species in the US and found: 0.8 to 3.3 percent of the land in the lower 48 states

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