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CLINICAL ARTICLES. Review of some of the Recent Advances In Tropical Medicine, Hygiene, and Tropical Veterinary Science, with Special Reference to their Possible Bearing on Medical, Sanitary, and Veterinary Work in the Anglo- Egyptian Soudan. By Andrew Balfour, M.D., B.Sc., F.R.C.P. Edin., D.P.H. Camb., and R. G. Archibald, M.B., R.A.M.C. London: Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, 1908. THIS review has been written mainly with the object of enabling the medical and veterinary officers stationed in the Soudan to keep in touch with current literature, and especially with the more recent advances in tropical medicine, hygiene, and veterinary science. It cannot be doubted that it will prove of special service to such officers, but, as a matter of fact, the review will be found exceedingly useful by all who are specially interested in these subjects. The volume extends to 238 pages, and as the subjects are dealt with in alphabetical order it is particularly handy for reference. As an example one may take the subject piroplasmosis. On turning to this, one finds that six and a half pages are devoted to summarising the researches of the last three years with regard to canine and bovine piroplasmosis, and no important contribution to the literature of the subject appears to have escaped notice. The price of the volume is 10/6. eLI N I CAL ART I C L E S. --0-- THE FOOT-SCAB MITE OF SHEEP (SYMBIOTES COMMUNIS, VAR. OVIS, RAILLIET). By T. W. CAVE, F.R.C.V.S., South-Eastern Agricultural College, Wye, Kent. ON visiting a flock of yearling Kent lambs at the beginning of February 1906, my attention was called to a number of lame animals, which were said by the shepherd" to have insects in their feet." An examination showed the presence of a pinkish-grey mass covering the skin between the claws of the lame feet. This material was thought by the shepherd to consist of insects of some kind. On removing a little of the substance with the blade of a penknife and examining it under a low objective, it was found to be composed of a collection of living acari. As the find appeared to be of an unusual character, some of the acari were submitted to my colleague, Prot: Theobald, for identification, and several affected lambs were placed under observation. The flock of lambs had been folded during the winter, and the fold was bedded with a thick mass of hay and straw. It was at first thought that the acari might have invaded the inter- digital space from the mass of bedding in the fold, and that they were not truly parasitic; but the microscopical examination at once revealed the fact that the mites were present in all stages of growth, and they were frequently seen in copulation, pointing to

Review of some of the Recent Advances in Tropical Medicine, Hygiene, and Tropical Veterinary Science, with Special Reference to their Possible Bearing on Medical, Sanitary, and Veterinary

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CLINICAL ARTICLES.

R eview of some of the Recent Advances In Tropical Medicine, Hygiene, and Tropical Veterinary Science, with Special Reference to their Possible Bearing on Medical, Sanitary, and Veterinary Work in the Anglo­Egyptian Soudan. By Andrew Balfour, M.D., B.Sc., F.R.C.P. Edin., D.P.H. Camb., and R. G. Archibald, M.B., R.A.M.C. London: Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, 1908.

THIS review has been written mainly with the object of enabling the medical and veterinary officers stationed in the Soudan to keep in touch with current literature, and especially with the more recent advances in tropical medicine, hygiene, and veterinary science. It cannot be doubted that it will prove of special service to such officers, but, as a matter of fact, the review will be found exceedingly useful by all who are specially interested in these subjects.

The volume extends to 238 pages, and as the subjects are dealt with in alphabetical order it is particularly handy for reference. As an example one may take the subject piroplasmosis. On turning to this, one finds that six and a half pages are devoted to summarising the researches of the last three years with regard to canine and bovine piroplasmosis, and no important contribution to the literature of the subject appears to have escaped notice. The price of the volume is 10/6.

eLI N I CAL ART I C L E S.

--0--

THE FOOT-SCAB MITE OF SHEEP (SYMBIOTES COMMUNIS, VAR. OVIS, RAILLIET).

By T. W. CAVE, F.R.C.V.S., South-Eastern Agricultural College, Wye, Kent.

ON visiting a flock of yearling Kent lambs at the beginning of February 1906, my attention was called to a number of lame animals, which were said by the shepherd" to have insects in their feet."

An examination showed the presence of a pinkish-grey mass covering the skin between the claws of the lame feet. This material was thought by the shepherd to consist of insects of some kind. On removing a little of the substance with the blade of a penknife and examining it under a low objective, it was found to be composed of a collection of living acari. As the find appeared to be of an unusual character, some of the acari were submitted to my colleague, Prot: Theobald, for identification, and several affected lambs were placed under observation.

The flock of lambs had been folded during the winter, and the fold was bedded with a thick mass of hay and straw.

It was at first thought that the acari might have invaded the inter­digital space from the mass of bedding in the fold, and that they were not truly parasitic; but the microscopical examination at once revealed the fact that the mites were present in all stages of growth, and they were frequently seen in copulation, pointing to