Romantic Literature - Mrs Pinkerton - Romantic Literature The Romantics, Fireside Poets, ... •the

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  • Romantic Literature

    The Romantics,

    Fireside Poets,

    and the Dark Romantics

  • What Romanticism is NOT:

  • a reaction against

    the Age of Reason (Rationalism)

    • Romantics believed in ____________ over reason and __________ over fact.

    • Looked to the _____ as well as to _______ for guidance and wisdom

    • The _______and the ________________ were embraced

    • _________ of civilization; rejection of rules • highly valued the __________ and _______________

    Romanticism was…

    IMAGINATION

    PAST

    EXOTIC

    INTUITION

    NATURE

    SUPERNATURAL

    DISTRUST

    INDIVIDUAL

    NON-CONFORMITY

  • Origins of Romanticism Started in Germany, spread through Europe and

    eventually made its way to the United States

    Fulfilled the need for

    AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL

    INDEPENDENCE from EUROPE

    Let’s take a look at some of the authors that put American Literature on the map.

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    - Ancestors lived in Salem during the Witch Trials

    - Fascinated with Puritans, faith, and sin. Many of his works reflect this.

    - Considered a Dark Romantic

    Most well known work:

    The Scarlet Letter (1850)

  • Herman Melvillle

    • Most well known work: Moby Dick (1851)

    the story of Captain Ahab chasing after a big white whale.

  • Emily Dickinson

    She became a recluse in her 20’s and started to dress only in white.

    Her poetic genius was not realized in her lifetime. Her poems were published posthumously.

    “Because I could not stop for Death,

    He kindly stopped for me;

    The carriage held but just ourselves

    And Immortality.”

  • Walt Whitman

    Considered the

    “quintessential American Poet”

    Most famous for his series of poems called Leaves of Grass

    Often called the “father of Free Verse”

  • The Fireside Poets

    represent a coming of age

    for American Literature

    - Wrote poetry that was read around the fire - Conservative literary style - Some of the most read and beloved poets

  • Use FIRE to remember …

    F Fantasy

    I Idealism & Imagination

    R Rejection of Rules

    E heightened Emotion & Escapism

  • The Fireside Poets

    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    Harvard professor

    Popular poet

    John Greenleaf Whittier

    Quaker

    James Russell Lowell

    Born to wealth and position

    Oliver Wendell Holmes

    Poet, physician, unofficial “laureate”

  • Quick RECALL: 1. Who wrote Moby Dick?

    2. Whose poetry was not published until after he/she died?

    3. What did Nathaniel Hawthorne write?

    4. Who is considered the “quintessential American poet?”

    5. What were Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, and Lowell known as? How did they get their name?

  • What aspect of Romanticism does this represent?

    Emphasis on heightened

    EMOTION

  • What aspect of Romanticism does this represent?

    Inspired by Nature

  • What aspect of Romanticism does this represent?

    importance of

    INDIVIDUALISM

  • What aspect of Romanticism does this represent?

    Use of the

    IMAGINATION

  • What aspect of Romanticism does this represent?

    Rejection of rules/ distrust of civilization

  • So … are you more a Romantic or a Rationalist?

    Imaginative

    Intuitive

    Nature lover

    Questions authority

    Not afraid to be different

    Logical

    Values reason

    Persuasive

    Problem solver

  • Romantic Art: Bagram Ibatoulline “From the Foundation Up”

  • Romantic Art: John Quidor “The Headless Horseman Pursuing Ichabod Crane”

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bhDoj672e38/TWQUAfFXArI/AAAAAAAABLI/nmGrGuFCvTQ/s1600/Horseman.jpg

  • The DARK romantics put a darker spin to the Romantic ideals:

    • NATURE connected to it in a relational way, decay & death, rain during times of sorrow ; “playing God” a topic introduced, yet looked down upon. Settings are often old, dilapidated castles/mansions

    • Independence through ALIENATION – characters alienate themselves; man seen as prone to sin and self-destruction.

    • the SUPERNATURAL – yes, hauntings and magic

  • famous DARK Romantic Authors

    Washington Irving Edgar Allan Poe

    Famous works:

    “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

    “Rip Van Winkle”

    Famous works:

    “The Tell-Tale Heart”

    “The Raven”

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    poetry that refrains from using specific meter patterns or rhyme scheme

    FREE VERSE

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    A word that imitates the sound it represents

    onomatopoeia

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    Sometimes called half rhyme; includes word pairs like lover and brother

    or fish and promise

    Slant rhyme

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    a recurring pattern of stressed (accented, or long) and unstressed (unaccented, or short) syllables in lines of a set length. Measured in iambs.

    Meter

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    a short poem consisting of five, usually unrhymed lines containing, respectively, two, four, six, eight, and two syllables

    OR any stanza of five lines.

    cinquain

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    A rhyme created by two or more words within the same line of verse.

    EX: “In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud”

    internal rhyme

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    From whose eyes a story is told

    Point of view

    Third person omniscient: a narrator (outside of the action of the story) that is all knowing

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    A direct address of something not physically present

    Apostrophe

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    the usually humorous play on words as to suggest two or more of its meanings or the meaning of another word

    similar in sound

    EX: She is a skillful pilot; her career has really taken off.

    pun

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    the use of words that begin with the same sound near one another

    as in wild and woolly or a babbling brook

    alliteration

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    recurrence or repetition of consonants especially at the end of stressed syllables

    mid-word like little and tattle

    or at the ends of words ( like stroke and luck )

    consonance

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    the use of words that have the same or very similar vowel sounds near one another

    ex: as the “i” in “rise high in the bright sky”

    assonance

  • Literary terms for the Romantic Period:

    Units of two or more lines grouped together in a poem (like a paragraph)

    stanza

  • The End!

    Just for fun …

    Create a t-shirt design that embraces an aspect of the Romantic Movement.