Science and Religion Science and Religion Science and religion Science and religion

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Text of Science and Religion Science and Religion Science and religion Science and religion

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  • Science and Religion Science and Religion Science and religion Science and religion
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  • Science and Religion What is Religion? What is Religion? What is Science? What is Science?
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  • Science and Religion The word religion derives from the Latin word to bind or to ligate (tie). The word religion derives from the Latin word to bind or to ligate (tie). It means bind to the gods It means bind to the gods
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  • Science and Religion The word science comes from the Latin word for knowledge The word science comes from the Latin word for knowledge It occurs in the word conscious It occurs in the word conscious
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  • Science and Religion Religion is a belief in something Religion is a belief in something The belief is not necessarily substantiated by physical or material evidence The belief is not necessarily substantiated by physical or material evidence Religious knowledge obtained through holy writings, authority, revelations and religious experiences Religious knowledge obtained through holy writings, authority, revelations and religious experiences Religionists have faith or trust in such knowledge Religionists have faith or trust in such knowledge
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  • Science and Religion Religious knowledge is qualitative not quantitative. Religious knowledge is qualitative not quantitative. Religious knowledge is not gotten through measurement Religious knowledge is not gotten through measurement In religion knowledge is taken as either true or false. In religion knowledge is taken as either true or false. Religious knowledge is neither progressive, nor tentative. Religious knowledge is neither progressive, nor tentative.
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  • Science and Religion Scientific knowledge is a relationship between observations Scientific knowledge is a relationship between observations The observations are subject to refinement The observations are subject to refinement Scientific knowledge is progressive and tentative Scientific knowledge is progressive and tentative Scientific knowledge is neither true nor false, but rather consistent with the observations and consistent with prior knowledge Scientific knowledge is neither true nor false, but rather consistent with the observations and consistent with prior knowledge
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  • Science and Religion Science formulates quantifiable questions Science formulates quantifiable questions Science uses units, numbers, direction along with mathematics to express knowledge Science uses units, numbers, direction along with mathematics to express knowledge Numbers are quantitative. Numbers are quantitative. Units are not a quality. Units are dimensions representing time, energy, weight, volume, length, brightness. Dimensions are independent variables Units are not a quality. Units are dimensions representing time, energy, weight, volume, length, brightness. Dimensions are independent variables
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  • Assumptions of Science The world is real. The world is real. The real world is knowable and comprehensible. The real world is knowable and comprehensible. There are laws that govern the real world. There are laws that govern the real world. Those laws are knowable and comprehensible. Those laws are knowable and comprehensible. Those laws don't [radically] change according to place or time, since the early stages of the big bang. Those laws don't [radically] change according to place or time, since the early stages of the big bang.
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  • Assumptions of Science Nature is understandable Nature is understandable The rules of logic are valid The rules of logic are valid Language is adequate to describe the natural realm Language is adequate to describe the natural realm Human senses are reliable. Human senses are reliable. Mathematical rules are descriptive for the physical world Mathematical rules are descriptive for the physical world
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  • Basic Assumptions of Science Assumptions are accepted without proof Assumptions are accepted without proof Form the basis of all scientific thinking Form the basis of all scientific thinking In other words, the basic assumptions of science are accepted on faith. Interesting. In other words, the basic assumptions of science are accepted on faith. Interesting.
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  • Limitations of Science Science can't answer questions about value. For example, there is no scientific answer to the questions, "Which of these flowers is prettier?" or "which smells worse, a skunk or a skunk cabbage?" And of course, there's the more obvious example, "Which is more valuable, one ounce of gold or one ounce of steel?" Our culture places value on the element gold, but if what you need is something to build a skyscraper with, gold, a very soft metal, is pretty useless. So there's no way to scientifically determine value. Science can't answer questions about value. For example, there is no scientific answer to the questions, "Which of these flowers is prettier?" or "which smells worse, a skunk or a skunk cabbage?" And of course, there's the more obvious example, "Which is more valuable, one ounce of gold or one ounce of steel?" Our culture places value on the element gold, but if what you need is something to build a skyscraper with, gold, a very soft metal, is pretty useless. So there's no way to scientifically determine value.
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  • Limitations of Science Science can't answer questions of morality. The problem of deciding good and bad, right and wrong, is outside the determination of science. This is why expert scientific witnesses can never help us solve the dispute over abortion: all a scientist can tell you is what is going on as a fetus develops; the question of whether it is right or wrong to terminate those events is determined by cultural and social rules--in other words, morality. The science can't help here. Science can't answer questions of morality. The problem of deciding good and bad, right and wrong, is outside the determination of science. This is why expert scientific witnesses can never help us solve the dispute over abortion: all a scientist can tell you is what is going on as a fetus develops; the question of whether it is right or wrong to terminate those events is determined by cultural and social rules--in other words, morality. The science can't help here.
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  • Limitations of Science Science can't help us with questions about the supernatural. The prefix "super" means "above." So supernatural means "above (or beyond) the natural." The toolbox of a scientist contains only the natural laws of the universe; supernatural questions are outside their reach. Science can't help us with questions about the supernatural. The prefix "super" means "above." So supernatural means "above (or beyond) the natural." The toolbox of a scientist contains only the natural laws of the universe; supernatural questions are outside their reach.
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  • A statement a scientist should not make (if he or she is well trained and is not manipulating you): A statement a scientist should not make (if he or she is well trained and is not manipulating you): Evolution is true. Evolution is true. The Big Bang happened. The Big Bang happened. Better statements: Better statements: The theory of evolution is by far the best model we have to explain both the fossil evidence and the genetic evidence with regard to the origin of all species. The theory of evolution is by far the best model we have to explain both the fossil evidence and the genetic evidence with regard to the origin of all species. The Big Bang model is in dramatic agreement will all known facts about the origin and history of the universe. The Big Bang model is in dramatic agreement will all known facts about the origin and history of the universe. Science seeks consistency, not truth. What is the simplest and most consistent explanation of the observation. Science seeks consistency, not truth. What is the simplest and most consistent explanation of the observation.
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  • Science and Religion Religion and science ask different kinds of questions and define words differently Religion and science ask different kinds of questions and define words differently Religion and science appear as if they were two incommensurate paradigms addressing the identical information arena Religion and science appear as if they were two incommensurate paradigms addressing the identical information arena
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  • Questions science asks and attempts to answer: Questions science asks and attempts to answer: When, where, how many, why (by what means) When, where, how many, why (by what means) How does a living thing function? How does a living thing function? What are the fundamental forces? What are the fundamental forces? Question religion asks and attempts to answer: Question religion asks and attempts to answer: Why am I here? Why am I here? Is that the right thing to do? Is that the right thing to do? How valuable am I? How valuable am I? Does God exist? Does God act (theism)? Does God exist? Does God act (theism)? Will that God respond if I pray? Will that God respond if I pray? Questions both ask (but by different means) Questions both ask (but by different means) How and when did life originate? How and when did life originate? How and whendid the universe originate? How and whendid the universe originate?
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  • Science and Religion Religion offers certainty Religion offers certainty Science is tentative Science