September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS 1 Enabling and Improving the Use of Mobile e-Services Workshop @ Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile

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September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS 1 Enabling and Improving the Use of Mobile e-Services Workshop @ Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Mobile HCI MDS) 2005 Salzburg, Austria September 19, 2005 Slide 2 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS2 Agenda 9:00- 10:30: Introduction to the work and the common parts 11:00- 12:30: Breakout session #1 User education and Setup tracks 12:30- 14:00 Lunch 14:00- 15:30: Breakout session #2 User education and Setup tracks 16:00- 17:00 Sum-up, conclusions and close of day 18:00 Workshop participants drink Coffee and convenience breaks will be flexible Slide 3 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS3 STF285 Present: Bruno von Niman, ITS (vonniman consulting) Martin Bcker, Siemens Matthias Schneider-Hufschmidt, Siemens Margareta Flygt, Sony Ericsson Pekka Ketola, Nokia David Williams, Motorola (majire) Absent with a good reason: Pascale Parodi, Nokia Michael Tate, BT Slide 4 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS4 Why standards? Slide 5 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS 5 No GSM coverage GSM coverage The GSM Footprint Slide 6 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS6 Background to ETSI Founded 1988, not-for-profit Officially recognised telecommunications ESO in Europe Based in Sophia Antipolis, south of France ~700 Members from ~60 countries from exactly 5 continents Manufacturers, network operators and service providers, administrations, research bodies and users providing a forum in which all key players can contribute http://www.etsi.org/ Slide 7 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS7 Background to ETSI Users 4%4% Administrations 8%8% Network Operators 13% Service Providers & Others 24%24% Manufacturers 51%51% Slide 8 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS8 ETSI success stories and work programme GSM B-ISDN Intelligent Networks ATM DECT Multimedia UPT TMN SDH Corporate Networks Cordless Terminal Mobility A/D Terminal Equipment ISDN Security Video on demand Testing Methods VoIP EMC UMTS (3G) DV B ONP RLL FITL TETRA DAB HDTV Teleworking WAN SES RLAN VSAT Virtual Networks Hiperlan DSRR TFTS CT2 SPS BRAN Public safety A/D Access SEC STQ DTV NA HF PTS TM EE CTM ERM Powerline Slide 9 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS9 ETSI TC Human Factors Responsible for human factors issues in all areas of telecommunications and ICT Responsibility to ensure ETSI takes account of the needs of all users- generic, older, young, disabled, etc. Produces standards, guidelines and reports that set the criteria necessary to ensure the best possible user experience Chairman: Stephen Furner (BT, UK) Vice Chairmen: Bruno von Niman (ITS, Sweden) Lutz Groh (Siemens, Germany) Slide 10 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS10 The user experience of ICT: 1876~ 1990 Intelligent agent-assisted, natural speech-controlled calls and text messages to and from unique wired devices Safe, secure, always-on Positioning services, context and location-sensitive Computers processed by specialists First Apples and PCs Major improvements: design; increasing number of users; HW: the handset, handsfree and push-button keys; technology advances. Slide 11 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS11 Consumer experience of ICT: 1990- Future Generation ICT plays a key role in everyday life - eSociety; Mobile, multimodal, personal, universal, converging, always- on, ever-smarter; Capabilities evolving further; More mobile than fixed; Growth driven by: Technology; voice-centric users, data adapters and mobile services; user experience. Complexity, interoperability and connectivity issues Slide 12 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS12 Everyday life- e-Society Slide 13 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS13 One-stop authentication Voice communication services Calendar Phone and address book Multi-messaging Web content Business applications Professional, personal, private Entertainment Mobile Fixed PC Mixed Multiple access to information and communication Slide 14 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS14 The Usability Gap Featurism - product complexity increasing Range of ICT users broadening children, older, disabled people Slide 15 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS15 Decreasing the Usability Gap Possible ways to decrease complexity include: understanding of user needs; excellent user interfaces; simplicity of configuration, operation and maintenance; personalization capabilities and ease of operation. Also helpful: technological advances (e.g. better speech recognition); a maturing ICT industry. Slide 16 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS16 Standards- starting with the user experience! Slide 17 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS17 The eEurope Initiative Launched by the European Commission in 2000:eEurope 2002 An Information Society For All Intended to accelerate positive change in the EU Aims to: secure equal access to digital systems and services for all of Europe's citizens promote computer literacy and create a partnership environment between the users and providers of systems, based on trust and enterprise Ultimate objective: bring everyone in Europe on-line Successful Building on this success, in June 2002 the initiative was extended into eEurope Action Plan 2005 Slide 18 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS18 eEurope "action lines" Accessible and cheaper Internet eResearch eSecurity eEducation eWorking eAccessibility eCommerce eGovernment eHealth eContent eTransport Slide 19 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS19 ETSI HF Specialist Task Forces - Requirements for assistive technology devices in ICT - Generic spoken command vocabulary for ICT devices and services - Guidelines on the multimodality of icons, symbols and pictograms - Guidelines for ICT products and services: Design for All - Access to ICT by children; Issues and guidelines - Alphanumeric characters in European languages: sorting orders and assignment to the 12-key telephone keypad - Human Factors of work in call centers - Multimodal interaction, communication and navigation - Maximizing the usability of UCI based systems - Guidelines for generic UI elements of mobile terminals and services - Telecare in and outside of intelligent homes - User profile management - Guidelines for the design and use of ICT by children -Duplex universal speech and text communication -Multicultural aspects of ICT -Etc. Slide 20 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS20 STF285: User Education and Set-up Procedures Contracted experts representing Nokia, Siemens, Sony Ericsson and Independent consultants Takes into account previous work Open, result-oriented, pro-active work based on consensus All results agreed with key players in the industry ETSI Guide to be published in 2006 Slide 21 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS21 STF 285: Scope Elaborate the previous work in two key areas: Set-up procedures User Education Provide guidelines on both areas in order to support device and service design: Support users in first-time device and service set up Support users in using features and services Principles identifying minimum quality standards Ensure a design-for-all approach (universal design) Outline solutions for ensuring access by the widest possible range of users Slide 22 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS22 Rationale for minimum standards in user guides User guides are frequently neglected by manufacturers Modern ICT devices are complex, miniaturised, evolving fast, used by novices, borrow inadequate UI concepts from computers, interact with other devices, have features based in device and others based in the network Bad user education leads to failure of feature set up, low or no service uptake, decreased trust in manufacturer and service provider Slide 23 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS23 Rationale for minimum standards in user guides The user guide is not complete (i.e. the information is not there) The information cannot be found The language of the user guide is inadequate The structure of the guide is inadequate The explanation of how to use a feature is to abstract The information cannot be perceived adequately The functionality / software implementation is not frozen at the time the user guide has to be completed Slide 24 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS24 Areas covered: user guides Legal and safety Localization User characteristics User education in product life cycle Factors influencing usage Generic guidelines Paper-based user guides User guides in the device Web-based user guides User guides on CD-ROMs Audio user guides User groups and for a User education and design for all Evaluation of user education Slide 25 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS 25 User education guidelines for mobile terminals and e-services Workhop held as part of Mobile HCI 2005 Salzburg, Austria 19.9.2005 Slide 26 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS26 The general image Slide 27 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS27 Why bother? User Guides matter: They are a part of the overall user experience They contribute to the users perception of the product quality They are one of the means for expressing brand values and messages A function that is not known or understood will not generate ARPU They are required (legal and regulatory requirements) Slide 28 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS28 Who needs them? No need for user guides if the UI is sufficiently self explanatory. But Mobile ICT products: are highly complex are difficult to set up have miniaturized input and output devices become even smaller even if screen resolution increases evolve fast are used by non experts Slide 29 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS29 Who needs them? No need for user guides if the UI is sufficiently self explanatory. But: UI concepts are inadequately borrowed from PCs They interact with PCs and other devices (e.g. for synchronization) Many feature concepts arent understood Services are often presented seamlessly The source of errors (device, service, network) is often unclear Slide 30 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS30 Who needs them? Users are heterogeneous Previous knowledge about features and UI concepts differs The range from power users to one-feature-only users Users differ in their physical and psychological needs and abilities (e.g. immigrants with limited local-language skills, low-literacy users, elderly or handicapped users) Slide 31 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS31 When is user education needed? User education is needed throughout the product life cycle Slide 32 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS32 Wider problem context Further problmens: Users fail to set up their device Users dont know about their personal subscription User guides are needed in first-time set up and in error situations Some features (e.g. Call Forwarding) are complex and have consequences Little or no information available on tariffing for services Slide 33 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS33 Wider problem context Problems with current user guidance: User guide is incomplete The information cannot be found The language used is inadequate The structure of the guide is inadequate The explanation is too abstract The information cannot be perceived adequately The functionality or SW implementation is not frozen at the time the user guide has to be completed The technical writer describes a product s/he doesnt really know Slide 34 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS34 Cost-benefit trade-offs Some relevant cost-benefit trade-offs related to providing user education are: Frustration with failure to fully being able to use a product leads to reduced ARPU and low brand loyalty Insufficient user education can lead to costs in customer care centres Written user guides are often not up to date at time of print Sometimes even the product is out of date at time of shipping (SW updates) Products are sent in as faulty because users dont understand how they work Slide 35 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS35 Current practice In spite of cost-benefit trade-offs: Cheapest, minimum effort solutions Very small fonts for cost saving Symbols to save space for text and costs for translating Reduced volume to save paper and reduce box sizes Wrong assumptions about what the users know User-guide related activities are outsourced No effort spent of user education for handicapped users Too little time for adjusting user guides to product changes Not all procedures are mentioned in detail Functions are described without preconditions Usability tests of user guides are the exceptions Same text different target groups and products Slide 36 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS36 What to think of when writing user guides Legal requirements Customers needs and expectations Management - Service Providers requirements Internal and external processes (defined, managed, repeatable) Slide 37 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS37 General guidelines for better user information Write style guides for language, illustrations and information structure for consistency Conduct usability studies not only for mobile terminals, but also for user education Use experienced staff for writing, lay-out, translation and usability testing well aware of the customers needs. Include lessons learnt for comming products Slide 38 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS38 To think of Localization the user guide is used worldwide Write style guides and conduct validations for translations Terminology use simple and clear, consistent language, industry- standard and user-friendly terms (invisible, intuitive, logical in its context, easy to understand, avoid jargon or abbreviations) Lay-out simple and clear Illustrations as information bearer Information structure - consistent Slide 39 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS39 Information to include Product description not how it works, but how to use it! Safety information How to use (turn on/off) Troubleshooting Maintenance & service Recycling & disposal If not complete where can you find more information Slide 40 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS40 Paper based User Guide + Still the most required and used kind of UG Often the master UG on which other medias are built on Required for legal reasons and legal texts - Long leadtimes (translation and print) Contact publishers and check their capabilities and restrictions of production in advance Slide 41 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS41 Paper based User Guide Slide 42 September 19, 2005 Salzburg Mobile HCI 2005 WS42 When do you want which information? Quick guide to get started Paper based user guide basic learning Support in device (on the run, start-up wizards, tips, avatars) Web extended versions and further explanati...