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The Influence of Prejudice on Attractiveness Liliana Gomez and Jeremy Allen Dr. Noice, Faculty Sponsor PSY 356: Research Methods Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois Photos Results A 2 X 2 repeated measures ANOVA was computed A repeated measures ANOVA yield a main effect for overall attractiveness of photos, F(1,25) = .000*** not possible****, p < .001, indicating that attractiveness of photos was significant. The one-way repeated measures ANOVA also yielded a main effect for the attractiveness of photo in comparison to the race of the photo, F(1,25) = .982, p < .001, showing no significant effect on the race of the photo and the level of attractiveness A repeated measures ANOVA showed an interaction for attractiveness of the photo and the race of the rater, F(1,25)= .984, p >.001, showing no significant effect of the race of the rater on the race of the photo.. WHAT HAPPENED TO THE RESULTS OF YOUR SURVEY? Conclusions Main Findings • Our results didn’t support our prediction because the race of the rater did not have any significant effect on how they judged photos of African Americans and Caucasians. • In other words, there was no difference in how the raters judged the attractiveness of the photos. Found a significant effect for the person portrayed in the photo •Overall Attractive photos were rated higher regardless of race • Negative Outcome: This study did not have Hispanic participants even though photos of Hispanics were presented. • Positive Outcome: Results indicate that prejudice has decreased over the years. • Future directions: Prejudice of populations other than college students should be studied Abstract The increase in diversity of ethnic groups attending colleges and universities has led many researchers to study minority students’ perspective on the supportiveness of college campuses. In an attempt to increase understanding on prejudice, the researchers investigated levels of prejudice among different ethnic groups. Participants in the study were African American, and Caucasian undergraduates. They were shown 12 photos depicting different ethnicities. They were asked to rate their attractiveness; they were also asked to fill out a questionnaire (which rated the students’ level of prejudice) and then fill out a short demographics survey. Results showed that there was no indication that race of the rater affected the level of attraction towards the photo. Introduction •Worthington, Loewy, Navarro, and Hart (2008) studied the effects of students’ different outlooks on the social environment of the campus. •Results: They found that students who had higher levels of color-blind racial attitudes (not being able to recognize racial differences) view the social environment more positive than other students. •According to Helm et al. (1998), Whites do not notice the importance of their own culture in comparison to other cultures because the school’s culture is basically designed for them since they are the majority (Worthington et al, 2008). • Lepore and Brown (1997) researched whether or not people who have high levels of prejudice and people who have low levels of prejudice hold the same stereotypes of ethnic minorities. •Results: Their study was consistent with past studies because it revealed that stereotypes were shared among people even if they were low on prejudice. In general, participants held ethnic stereotypes that were negative. •Soble, Spanierman, and Liao (2010) examined the effects of watching a movie on the racial attitudes of white university students. •Conclusion: They found that the brief video clip in the experimental group produced significant racial attitude changes. •After, the video in the experimental condition students were able to understand the experiences, feelings, and emotions ethnic minorities went through. Method •12 photos; 6 attractive and 6 unattractive •Race of the photos: Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic •8 questions were selected from the Quick Index Discrimination (Ponterrotto et al., 1995). Example of Questions used: I really think affirmative action programs on college campuses constitute reverse discrimination. Photos Rater Race Caucasian African American M SD M SD Attractive Caucasian 3.85 .18 3.43 .31 Attractive African American 4.15 .21 4.21 .35 Unattractive Caucasian 1.65 .12 1.50 .21 Unattractive African American 2.23 .16 2.00 .27 NOTE: Caucasian raters: n = 20 African-American raters: n= 7 Table 1 Mean Attractiveness Ratings for Photos of African Americans and Caucasians as a Function of the Race of the Rater

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The Influence of Prejudice on AttractivenessAbstractThe increase in diversity of ethnic groups attending colleges and universities has led many researchers to study minority students perspective on the supportiveness of college campuses. In an attempt to increase understanding on prejudice, the researchers investigated levels of prejudice among different ethnic groups. Participants in the study were African American, and Caucasian undergraduates. They were shown 12 photos depicting different ethnicities. They were asked to rate their attractiveness; they were also asked to fill out a questionnaire (which rated the students level of prejudice) and then fill out a short demographics survey. Results showed that there was no indication that race of the rater affected the level of attraction towards the photo.

Liliana Gomez and Jeremy AllenDr. Noice, Faculty Sponsor PSY 356: Research Methods Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois

Photos

ResultsA 2 X 2 repeated measures ANOVA was computed A repeated measures ANOVA yield a main effect for overall attractiveness of photos, F(1,25) = .000*** not possible****, p < .001, indicating that attractiveness of photos was significant. The one-way repeated measures ANOVA also yielded a main effect for the attractiveness of photo in comparison to the race of the photo, F(1,25) = .982, p < .001, showing no significant effect on the race of the photo and the level of attractiveness A repeated measures ANOVA showed an interaction for attractiveness of the photo and the race of the rater, F(1,25)= .984, p >.001, showing no significant effect of the race of the rater on the race of the photo.. WHAT HAPPENED TO THE RESULTS OF YOUR SURVEY?

IntroductionWorthington, Loewy, Navarro, and Hart (2008) studied the effects of students different outlooks on the social environment of the campus. Results: They found that students who had higher levels of color-blind racial attitudes (not being able to recognize racial differences) view the social environment more positive than other students. According to Helm et al. (1998), Whites do not notice the importance of their own culture in comparison to other cultures because the schools culture is basically designed for them since they are the majority (Worthington et al, 2008). Lepore and Brown (1997) researched whether or not people who have high levels of prejudice and people who have low levels of prejudice hold the same stereotypes of ethnic minorities. Results: Their study was consistent with past studies because it revealed that stereotypes were shared among people even if they were low on prejudice. In general, participants held ethnic stereotypes that were negative. Soble, Spanierman, and Liao (2010) examined the effects of watching a movie on the racial attitudes of white university students.

ConclusionsMain Findings

Table 1Mean Attractiveness Ratings for Photos of African Americans and Caucasians as a Function of the Race of the Rater

Our results didnt support our prediction because the race of the rater did not have any significant effect on how they judged photos of African Americans and Caucasians. In other words, there was no difference in how the raters judged the attractiveness of the photos.

PhotosConclusion: They found that the brief video clip in the experimental group produced significant racial attitude changes.

Rater

Found a significant effect for the person portrayed in the photo Overall Attractive photos were rated higher regardless of race

CaucasianAfter, the video in the experimental condition students were able to understand the experiences, feelings, and emotions ethnic minorities went through.

African American

Negative Outcome: This study did not have Hispanic participants even though photos of Hispanics were presented.

Race M SD M SD

Positive Outcome: Results indicate that prejudice has decreased over the years. Future directions: Prejudice of populations other than college students should be studied

Method12 photos; 6 attractive and 6 unattractive

Attractive Caucasian

3.85

.18

3.43

.31

Attractive African AmericanRace of the photos: Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic 8 questions were selected from the Quick Index Discrimination (Ponterrotto et al., 1995). Example of Questions used: I really think affirmative action programs on college campuses constitute reverse discrimination.

4.15

.21

4.21

.35

Unattractive Caucasian Unattractive African

1.65

.12

1.50

.21

2.23 American

.16

2.00

.27

Research QuestionDoes race or prejudice influence how people judge the attractiveness of other races? Hypotheses: We hypothesized that if someone sees a picture of a person of a different ethnic, national, or racial background from their own they will rate them more negatively as opposed to someone with similar characteristics as their own.

NOTE: Caucasian raters: n = 20 African-American raters: n= 7