Smarter Balanced Assessment Basics

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Smarter Balanced Assessment Basics. Vernon G. Gettone, Ph.D. Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Staff. Table Think, Table Talk!. At your table, pick a partner and introduce yourself. Tell one another something you already know about Smarter Balanced Assessment. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Smarter Balanced Assessment BasicsVernon G. Gettone, Ph.D.Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Staff

1Table Think, Table Talk!At your table, pick a partner and introduce yourself.Tell one another something you already know about Smarter Balanced Assessment.Then share a question you have about the assessment.

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24 States representing 39% of K-12 students

22 Governing 1 Advisory 1 Affiliate

Washington State is fiscal agent

WestEd provides project management servicesSBAC Consortium of States*California is a Governing StateRe-take option

Optional Interim assessment system Summative assessment for accountabilityLast 12 weeks of year*DIGITAL CLEARINGHOUSE of formative tools, processes and exemplars; released items and tasks; model curriculum units; educator training; professional development tools and resources; scorer training modules; and teacher collaboration tools.Scope, sequence, number, and timing of interim assessments locally determined* Time windows may be adjusted based on results from the research agenda and final implementation decisions.Source: http://www.ets.org

Computer AdaptiveAssessment andPerformance Tasks

PERFORMANCETASKS Reading Writing MathEND OF YEARADAPTIVE ASSESSMENTEnglish Language Arts and Mathematics, Grades 38 and High School

Computer AdaptiveAssessment andPerformance TasksBEGINNING OF YEAREND OF YEARINTERIM ASSESSMENTINTERIM ASSESSMENT4Digital Library4Smarter Balanced Digital LibraryThe formative assessment component of the Smarter Balanced system of assessments

Will contain formative assessment strategies and professional learning and instructional resources for educators

Access will be provided to all California LEAs at no cost.

The first stage of the Digital Library is scheduled to be available in April 2014.

5Smarter Balanced Digital Library (cont.)All resources must meet certain quality criteria to be included in the Digital Library:

Incorporates high-quality formative assessment practicesReflects learner differences and supports personalized learningDemonstrates utility, engagement, and user-friendliness

Approximately 150 California educators are helping to review and contribute proposed resources as part of the State Network of Educators (SNE).

6Smarter Balanced Digital Library (cont.)Will contain Web-based professional learning and instructional modules on topics such as:

the Common Core State Standardsassessment literacyunderstanding the Smarter Balanced content specificationsformative assessment process within the context of the Smarter Balanced assessment system7Improving Teaching & LearningCommon Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readinessAll students leave high school college and career ready Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning

Summative: College and career readiness assessments for accountabilityInterim: Flexible and open assessments, used for actionable feedbackFormative resources:Supporting classroom-based assessments to improve instruction88June 3, 2013

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RememberingUnderstandingApplyingAnalyzingEvaluatingCreatingBlooms Taxonomy Updated1997 Standards2010 Common Core Standards10

RememberingRecalling information Recognizing, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, findingUnderstandingExplaining ideas or conceptsInterpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing, classifying, explainingApplyingUsing information in another familiar situationImplementing, carrying out, using, executingAnalyzingBreaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationshipsComparing, organizing, deconstructing, interrogating, findingEvaluatingJustifying a decision or course of actionChecking, hypothesizing, critiquing, experimenting, judgingCreatingGenerating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing thingsDesigning, constructing, planning, producing, inventing.Blooms Taxonomy Updated11Cognitive LearningCCSS require high-level cognitive demandAsking students to demonstrate deeper conceptual understanding through the application of content knowledge and skills to new situations and sustained tasksApplies Webbs Depth of Knowledge (DOK) to Blooms Cognitive Process DimensionsBloom: What type of thinking is needed to complete a task?Webb: How deeply do you have to understand the content to successfully interact with it? How complex or abstract is the content?

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13Webbs Depth of Knowledge (DOK) LevelsDOK 1: Recall & ReproductionRecall of a fact, term, principle, concept; perform a routine procedure, locate detailsDOK 2: Basic Application of Skills/ConceptsUse of information, two or more steps with decision points along the way, explain relationshipsDOK 3: Strategic ThinkingRequires reasoning or developing a plan or sequence of steps, requires decision-making or justificationDOK 4: Extended ThinkingAn investigation or application to real world; requires time to research, problem solve, and process multiple conditions; could require synthesis of information across multiple sources and/or disciplines14ELA DOK Levels

15MATH DOK Levels

16Bloom to Webbs DOK Levels

17ELA Claims Claim #1ReadingStudents can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts.Claim #2WritingStudents can produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences.Claim #3Speaking and ListeningStudents can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences.Claim #4Research/InquiryStudents can engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information.Overall Claim for Grades 38Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy.Overall Claim for Grade 11Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy.Nancy spoke about the Smarter Balanced Content Specifications and how, the specifications, were developed to guide assessment design.

As Nancy also pointed out, there are claims within the content specifications; the four claims for mathematics can be seen on the current slide. These claims are the statements of what students can do and the evidence needed to show what they can do.

The Claims begin on p. 25 in the Content Specifications, with claim 1, Concepts and Procedures.

Claim #1 focuses on the CCSS-M Content Standards; the standards we reviewed relevant vocabulary on, a few slides prior.

Claims 2 through 4, Problem Solving, Communicating Reasoning, and Modeling and Data Analysis focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practices. Remember, the mathematical practices specify how a student should be engaged mathematically when solving an item or task.

18Math Claims Claim #1Concepts & Procedures Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency.Claim #2Problem SolvingStudents can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies.Claim #3Communicating ReasoningStudents can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others.Claim #4Modeling and Data AnalysisStudents can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.Overall Claim for Grades 38Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in mathematics. Overall Claim for Grade 11Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in mathematics.Nancy spoke about the Smarter Balanced Content Specifications and how, the specifications, were developed to guide assessment design.

As Nancy also pointed out, there are claims within the content specifications; the four claims for mathematics can be seen on the current slide. These claims are the statements of what students can do and the evidence needed to show what they can do.

The Claims begin on p. 25 in the Content Specifications, with claim 1, Concepts and Procedures.

Claim #1 focuses on the CCSS-M Content Standards; the standards we reviewed relevant vocabulary on, a few slides prior.

Claims 2 through 4, Problem Solving, Communicating Reasoning, and Modeling and Data Analysis focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practices. Remember, the mathematical practices specify how a student should be engaged mathematically when solving an item or task.

19Claims 2, 3, & 4: Relevant VerbsClaim 2Claim 3Claim 4Now lets go back and take a look at the relevant verbs that will aid educators in determining which cluster headings will be assessed through claims 2, 3 and/or 4

While it is relatively easy to match up the content standards to the assessment targets in claim 1, it is a little different with claims 2, 3, and 4.

The table on this slide lists the relevant verbs identified for each claim; notice that some verbs, such as understand and analyze fall in multiple claims.

The relevant verbs will help in identifying the Math Content Clusters and/or standards that will be assessed for each claim.

Once the claim is identified through the verbs, the assessment targets that align are dependent on the primary domain and cluster heading being assessed. Certain content lends itself more nicely with certain assessment targets under claims 2, 3 or 4.

We will look at determining assessments targets through relevant verbs more closely later on in the webinar when we discuss implications for instruction.

20Accessibility & Accommodations

21CDE website wit