SNOW LEOPARD CONSERVANCY Snow Leopards Reclassified to Vulnerable Dr. Rodney Jackson was one of five

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Text of SNOW LEOPARD CONSERVANCY Snow Leopards Reclassified to Vulnerable Dr. Rodney Jackson was one of five

  • SNOW LEOPARD CONSERVANCY

    Annual Report

    . . . . . . . . . 2017

  • 2 . . . . . Annual Report 2017

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FROM THE FOUNDER-DIRECTOR

    Rodney Jackson, Founder-Director

    Snow Leopard Conservancy’s Mission

    Ensuring snow leopard survival and conserving mountain landscapes by

    expanding environmental awareness and sharing innovative practices

    through community stewardship and partnerships

    Dear Snow Leopard Conservancy Supporters: There was good news for snow leopards in 2017. These magnificent cats were reclassified on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List from Endangered to Vulnerable, reflecting a slowed rate of decline and populations that are stabilized or even slightly increasing in several countries. This improved status of the cats is in part a result of your support for the Conservancy’s community based conservation efforts. Thank you! We completed a ten-year, range-wide genetic research effort that suggests there are three distinct subspecies of snow leopards. The international team was lead by Conservancy partner Dr. Jan Janečka. If accepted by the broader scientific community, this

    discovery opens the door to regionally-based Red List assessments in the future and, I hope, more strategic targeting of resources and conservation measures. As we celebrate these milestones, we must also renew our commitment to community-based conservation of snow leopards and their habitat. Climate change, infrastructure development, poaching, conflict between herders and snow leopards—all continue to contribute to the vulnerability of a species that is both an ecological indicator and a sacred totem. Your support has enabled the Conservancy to grow the number of predator-proofed livestock corrals in Pakistan, to install more Foxlights in the Nepal Himalaya, and to reach ever more people across the range countries through Snow Leopard Day celebrations. On Page 9 of this Report, we feature Shafqat Hussain and Ghulam Mohammad. They are the driving forces behind the Baltistan Wildlife Conservation & Development Organization (BWCDO), which was awarded the prestigious UN Development Programme's Equator Prize. As the first Pakistanis to receive this prize, they are characteristic of the passionate individuals and small but effective organizations the Snow Leopard Conservancy is committed to support. Thank you for again enabling us to make a difference that grows from field-based, grassroots efforts.

    Photo: Lyubov Ivashkina

  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Annual Report 2017 . . . . . 3

    Each week, the Nepalese Radio Program, Surroundings of the Snow Leopard, reached an estimated 50,000 listeners in snow leopard habitat, and more than one million elsewhere throughout the Nepal Himalaya. The Conservancy facilitated deployment of 57 new trail cameras in Mongolia, Nepal

    and Pakistan, greatly adding to our local partners’ ability to monitor snow leopard populations in their critical habitat areas. Conservancy partners led the celebration of Snow Leopard Day in Nepal and Pakistan. Land of Snow Leopard (LOSL) Network members independently initiated celebrations in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Altai & Buryat Republics of Russia, and Tajikistan. Combined, their conservation messages reached some 15,000 students, teachers, and members of the general public living in snow leopard habitat. Conservancy partners worked with herders to install Foxlights and predator-proof livestock corrals, protecting up to 125 snow leopards from retributive killing across more than 25 village areas in Nepal and Pakistan. 36 Community Monitors were trained by our Land of the Snow Leopard Network members in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Russia, and Mongolia, to use our special App for Android devices. They are now monitoring wildlife and collecting culturally-relevant stories that will inform innovative educa- tional tools for snow leopard conservation.

    Photo, trail camera: Ghulam Mohammad, BWCDO

  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    4 . . . . . Annual Report 2017

    Your donor dollars are helping the

    Snow Leopard Conservancy facilitate

    community-based conservation

    education and action in the snow

    leopard’s high, remote, culturally rich

    habitat.

    At right: Nepal’s Snow Leopard Scouts

    held a parade as part of their first Snow

    Leopard Day Festival.

    Below: LOSL Network members

    organized the first cross-boundary

    Snow Leopard Day festival, between

    schools in the Russian and Mongolian

    Altai Mountains.

    Below: Nepal’s third issue of the Snow Leopard Magazine.

    Right: Bhutan’s fifth

    annual Jomolhari

    Festival featured a new logo and felted

    snow leopard handi-

    crafts created by

    students at the school

    for the deaf.

    P h o to

    : L

    y u b o v I

    v a s h k in

    a

  • Annual Report 2017 . . . . . 5

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IN

    Our programs reach both city-dwellers

    and herders and farmers in the

    Himalaya, Altai-Sayan, Pamir and Tien

    Shan Mountains. Snow Leopard Day

    celebrations were held, for the first time,

    by LOSL partners, in many new areas.

    Left: In Kyrgyzstan, celebrations organized by

    park staff, teachers, and LOSL Network mem-

    bers included the creation of a plaque to honor the snow leopards of Chon-Kemin National

    Park.

    Below: Conservancy partners in Pakistan

    emphasize the link between education and

    appreciation for the environment, especially for girls. 1700 students participated in

    conservation education activities in 2017.

    Above: During Buryatia’s Snow

    Leopard Day celebrations,

    children who live at the foot of the sacred mountain Vankeev

    Saridak played interactive snow

    leopard habitat games and wrote

    love letters to “Irbis,” (snow

    leopard in the Russian language).

    P h o to

    : R

    u ra

    l D

    e v e lo

    p m

    e n t

    F u n d

    P h o to

    : B

    a ik

    a l B u ry

    a t

    C e n te

    r fo

    r C u lt u ra

    l C o n s e rv

    a ti o n

    P h o to

    : G

    h u la

    m M

    o h a m

    m a d

  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COLLABORATING WITH INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

    6 . . . . . Annual Report 2017

    Above: A wild snow

    leopard roams Baltistan’s

    high mountains, cap- tured on camera by

    Ghulam Mohammad,

    BWCDO.

    Left: Tashi Ghale,

    Conservationist with

    Conservancy partner GPN, sets a trail camera

    in Nepal’s Manang

    District. Knowing the

    actual leopards that

    inhabit their neighbor-

    hood engages communities in better

    stewardship of the cats

    and their ecosystem.

  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TO PROTECT

    Annual Report 2017 . . . . . 7

    Communities are the key to snow leopard

    conservation. Your donor dollars have helped

    the Conservancy facilitate non-lethal measures

    to protect livestock from snow leopards.

    Right: Sacred site Guardian

    Zhaparkul Raymbekov (seated,

    in white) gives a blessing for LOSL Network members at a

    sacred spring in Kyrgyzstan.

    The Conservancy works

    through the LOSL Network

    with Shamans, Sacred Site

    Guardians, and their supporters to revive traditions

    that protect snow leopards.

    Top left: Predator-proof livestock corral in

    Baltistan, Pakistan.

    Top right: Meeting with herders for Foxlight installation in Manang, Nepal.

    Middle right: Herders ready to set up their

    solar-powered Foxlights.

    P h o to

    : L

    y u b o v I

    v a s h k in

    a

  • 8 . . . . . Annual Report 2017

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . &

    In-Kind Donations

    ESRI, mapping software

    Glitchbusters, computer tech support

    Google for Nonprofits

    Interpretation: Raso Alamshoev, Maria Azhunova

    Lorena Designs, jewelry

    Ian Whalen, Foxlights

    Watermark Press, printing

    Wildlife photographers: Oriol Alamany, Peter Bolliger, Jens

    Hauser, Bjorn Persson, Steve Tracy, Janco van Gelderen

    The Conservancy’s staff, board and

    volunteers gave over 800 hours of their

    time, worth $10,860.

    The individuals below have given

    extraordinary gifts of time and expertise.

    The organizations have provided a

    platform for outreach and donations

    Ebay Giving Works

    Charleen Gavette, GIS mapping

    Hotels for Hope

    Shavaun Mara Kidd, social media

    Sujin Le