Summer Session 2009 The First Steps of Math Curriculum Alignment K-5

  • View
    217

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Text of Summer Session 2009 The First Steps of Math Curriculum Alignment K-5

  • Slide 1

Summer Session 2009 The First Steps of Math Curriculum Alignment K-5 Slide 2 Facilities Restrooms Kitchen Computers Phones Snacks/Drinks Dress Slide 3 Welcome! Introductions and Rationale Overview of the week Reflections on our content/student strengths and needs Day 1 Unpack/Create Power Standards/Wikis Day 2 Power Standards/Content Area Vocabulary/Shared Agreements Day 3 Curriculum Mapping/Essential Questions Day 4 Curriculum Mapping and Planning Day 5 Benchmarking and Evaluation Slide 4 Why This? Why Now? Overworked Pressure Not the Same old Vertical Alignment Discussion Eliminate the Baggage Make things Easier by Front Loading Capitalize on our Greatest Resources No man is an island entire unto himself. John Donne Were in this together! Slide 5 Shuffle Break into your grade level or course groups 5th grade math 4 th grade math 3 th grade math 2 nd grade math 1 st grade math Kindergarten math Slide 6 Activity #1 Write your grade level or course name at the top of the large chart paper Make a + chart four equal zones Slide 7 Understanding Each Other What do your students know really well when they get to you? -- TL List up to three things you wish students had more of when they arrive in your class.? -- TR In your opinion, what are the three to five most important aspects /concepts / units / ideas in your curriculum? -- BL What do you wish you could give your students more of? Why isnt this possible? -- BR Slide 8 What is Vertical Alignment? Slide 9 This Week The Plan Math 5th 4 th 3 th 2 nd 1 st K Math English Science Arts Social Studies Vocational Continue K-12 Slide 10 Curriculum Alignment Curriculum and learning objectives are aligned or matched both at the grade level and across curricular areas to ensure that students are provided appropriate learning opportunities in order to achieve the identified learning objectives or outcomes. Appropriate alignment is an ongoing process that prepares students for the next level of learning. Slide 11 Understanding the What and Why of Vertical Alignment More than establishing scope and sequence Process of ensuring A good match between state standards and lessons taught in classrooms on a daily basis Instructional activities are aligned to standards An appropriate amount of time is devoted to instruction Unnecessary repetitions are removed Gaps are identified Assessments are appropriate (Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989). Slide 12 What Does the Research Say? Research indicates that alignment is a powerful indicator of academic achievement. that an aligned curriculum can increase student-achievement and helps to overcome the usual predictors of socio-economic status, gender, race, and teacher quality variables. (Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989). Slide 13 The Cost of Misalignment Poor student achievement Under-prepared students Fewer students meeting expectations At-risk populations in jeopardy Teachers working hard but not producing Teachers unclear about responsibilities Slide 14 Simply Stated A clear target understood by the student, the parent, and the teacher, assessed in a clearly understood manner has the best opportunity of being achieved. Slide 15 Questions? Slide 16 So, Whats the Plan? Outline of HPS Plan for Secondary Vertical Alignment Slide 17 HPS Plan Phase 1 1.Unpack the curriculum for each course 2.Create Power Standards 3.Create Shared Agreements in each content area 4.Create Course/Content Area Vocabulary Lists Slide 18 HPS Plan Phase 2 5. Design District-Wide Curriculum Maps using the HPS template 6. Post Power Standards, Shared Agreements, Vocabulary, and Pacing Guides on the HPS webpage and make them available to parents. 7. Create District-wide Benchmark Assessments collaboratively Slide 19 The BIG Picture Where are we going with all this? Beginning with the end in mind Wikis Slide 20 Source: Hawaii DPI Immediate Concerns Textbook as crutch Time spent addressing content Stability and/or continuity of teaching staff Transience of students Previous school experiences of students Teacher knowledge and experience Seeing the big picture Slide 21 Questions? Ten Minute Break Slide 22 Step #1 Unpacking the Curriculum Slide 23 Why Unpack? Unpacking forces us to focus on what is important to teach When curriculum appropriately governs time and content, academic learning time increases, and so will student achievement. Slide 24 Food for Thought 2000 Marzano study NCTM national math standards (741 mathematical dimensions drawn from national standards) 10 math teachers asked to identify the standards that were essential for all students to learn regardless of their future aspirations Through combination and rankings, these teachers produced a list of 406 standards (a reduction of 46%) This is the format we will follow today (Marzano, 2006) Slide 25 Step 1: Unpacking the Curriculum How Do We Unpack? Ask the questions that will lead to the big ideas in the standards What exactly does each standard/objective mean? What is essential? What can be combined, needs to be addressed in parts? What does not need to be addressed at this time? Slide 26 Unpacking the Standards Have discussions that include what students will need to understand/ demonstrate in order to achieve mastery in the course What do I know about my students prior knowledge and experience in relation to each standard? What does the state/standardized assessment tell us about what standards are important? Slide 27 The Goals of Unpacking To provide greater clarity about what needs to be taught To help teachers communicate clearly what students are to learn to parents, colleagues, and administrators To determine the most important elements in the curriculum (To collect the information needed to create power standards step 2)power standards Slide 28 Tools Copies of NCSCoS EOG test question breakdown Indicators and Week by Weeks (online) K-2 Assessment information Highlighters, pens, and paper/computer Teacher input*** Curriculum specialists Time TOGETHER as a group* Textbooks or other course resources Slide 29 Process Brainstorming from all documents NCSCoS EOG information Other resources Narrow down and refine the standards Chunk or Chuck Come to consensus on essential content for each grade level or course The value is in the process* Slide 30 Goals 1.Narrow down the most crucial aspects of the curriculum get rid of the rest 2.Organize chunk the information as you think most appropriate for your content area 3.Have a member of your group type your new information in the manner in which you choose Slide 31 References (2002). The standards-based instructional planning process: Backwards mapping from standards to instruction. Retrieved November 28, 2007, from The California State University Web site: http://www.calstate.edu/CAPP/projects/Module_2.pdf (2007). Academic excellence framework RISD strategic plan. Retrieved November 28, 2007, from Rock Island School District #41 Office of Instruction & School Improvement Web site: http://curriculum.risd41.org/committee/aef/04-05/AEF.ppt Ainsworth, Larry (2006). Making standards work series: power standards. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from Center for Performance Assessment Web site: http://www.makingstandards work.com/professional.develoment/power_standards.htm Cox, Kathy. (2006). Georgia performance standards: days 4 and 5. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from Georgia Department of Education Web site: http://www.georgiastandards.org /DMGetDocument.aspx/gps_redelivery_4-5_science.ppt?p=4BE1EECF99CD364 EA5554055463F1FBBF5D074D5FB1F2CAEB3B63B3ECB220CDD26C2114F3C57 D8D2E02406F764128C53&Type=D Dean, Ceri B. (2003). A report documenting the process for developing an integrated standards- based instructional unit. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from McRel Mid-Continental Research for Education and Learning Web site: http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/Standards/ 5031TG_DevelopingaStandards-basedUnit.pdf Marzano, Robert J (2006). Classroom assessment and grading that work. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Slide 32 Vertical Alignment Continues Creating Power Standards Developing a Course Vocabulary Slide 33 Continuing... Burning Issues Reviewing our Unpacked Curriculum Understanding and Writing Power Standards The Art of Choosing Course Vocabulary Terms Slide 34 Burning Issues Your questions from the issue bin Feel free to post questions during this session as well What would you like to know more about? Whats still unclear? A-HA moments! What surprised you most? Slide 35 Review and Assess The assignment Review all unpacked curricula 5 th Grade -- reviewed by 3 rd Grade 4 th Grade reviewed by 2 nd Grade 3 rd Grade reviewed by 1 st Grade 2 nd Grade reviewed by K 1 st Grade reviewed by 5 th Grade K reviewed by 4 th Grade Slide 36 Goals 1.Narrow down the most crucial aspects of the curriculum get rid of the rest 2.Organize chunk the information as you think most appropriate for your content area 3.Have a member of your group type your new information in the manner in which you choose Slide 37 Questions to Answer 1.Do you have a clear understanding of the most important concepts in this content area? If not, what information do you need to clarify the concepts? 2.Is information categorized and chunked in a manner that makes sense? If not, explain. (too much content, not enough content, organization, etc.) 3.What are up to three questions you have for the content area teachers? 4.