THE UNIVERSALISTS ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION

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    THE UNIVERSALISTS ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATIONSource: The American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 51, No. 6 (NOVEMBER ANDDECEMBER, 1889), p. 139Published by: World Affairs InstituteStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27897856 .Accessed: 15/05/2014 04:16

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  • THE AMERICAN ADVOCATE OF PEACE AND ARBITRATION. 139

    THE UNIVERSALISTS ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION.

    At the national convention of Universalists, held at Lynn, Mass., Oct. 22-21, the following preambles and

    resolution were adopted unanimously, and forwarded to

    the Conference of American States at Washington, D. C. Whereas, More than sixty cases of international

    con

    troversy have been settled by arbitration since 1816, to more than half of which the United States have been a

    party, and to nearly one-third of which Great Britain has been a party ; and

    Whereas, the London Economist declares that in the great wars of Christendom during twenty-five years of this period, namely, from 1852 to 1877, including the Franco-German War and our own Civil War, there was

    expended not less than $12,500,000,000, involving the slaughter of millions of men, and the ruin of millions of homes ; therefore

    Resolved, That this General Convention of Universa lists earnestly request our National Government to use every means in its power to form treaties with other

    nations providing beforehand that all controversies shall be referred to a Board of Arbitration before resort to arms.

    [The economy of arbitration and the extravagance of war,?its effect on taxation merely,?have never been

    brought in simpler or sharper contrast. Rev. A. A.

    Miner, D. D., who proposed and Rev Henry Blanchard of Portland, who reported the resolutions, as well as the enthusiastic vote of a great representative body of Christians, deserve notice and gratitude.?Ed.]

    CHRISTIANITY VS. RUM AND OPIUM.

    Miss E. E. Flagg, writing to the Christian Cynosure, wonders how such a paragraph as the following, clipped from one of our Boston dailies, will read to the people fifty years from now. u The Steamship Nithsdale is loading at pier 4, Charles town, a large cargo for the west coast of Africa. It in cludes 1120 packages of New England rum; 700 hogs heads already have been loaded, some tobacco and a few barrels of flour." The paper further states that "the Liberian government wanted the Nithsdale to carry over

    four missionaries, but did not furnish any passage money, so the agents refused to carry them." The agents did quite right. What would be the use of sending four missionaries to Africa with 1120 casks of New England rum? The place for missionaries is in Massachusetts where, within five miles of the State-house, nine-tenths of the rum which America sends to Africa is produced.

    Dr. R. S. Storrs did not state the case too strongly when he said :

    Christianity helps commerce everywhere, and Chris tianity has the right to require that commerce shall help it and shall not hinder it. Christianity has the right to demand that the agents of commerce on foreign shores shall not be men of loose life and vicious manners and an infidel spirit ; and Christianity has certainly the right to require that commerce shall not debase the nation which it is trying to lift by helping the opium traffic in China and by pouring millions of gallons of the vilest liquors into Africa. Every dollar won by a traffic of that kind

    ought to burn ?u a man's hand like a bit of the infernal

    asphalt which is the pavement of Hell. Riches so

    acquired simply reek with the blood of immortal souls ; and

    Christianity would be false to its trust if it did not re monstrate and condemn ; and civilization and commerce

    are false to their trust if they do not in this sympathize with the Gospel of our Lord and of his Christ.

    SELLING NAVY YARDS.

    The Secretary of the United States Navy will propose to sell such of the United States Navy Yards as can not be profitably utilized for the building and repairs of naval vessels. That seems sensible. Why keep them in idle ness and lose the interest on their value for commercial purposes, and spend money in repairs on them or let them rot down. Common business thrift would compel any owner but a government to use or sell them. And

    yet we hear the cry for new vessels, new fortifications and greater armaments everywhere. Gui bono? To

    spend millions on such things is to waste what they cost and then pay an enormous interest on that cost to keep them up?or else let them run to decay and ruin. If new fortifications are built they must be manned. To man such fortifications as are now recommended would require a new army of 75,000 men (100,000 inali) to be fed, clothed and paid to live in idleness ; to be a standing menace to peace ; to furnish politicians an argument for war ; to give the government a new pretext for taxing the industrious and thrifty, and to furnish contractors a new

    temptation to corruption. Let us have the reasons for a

    great army and navy. Look at the first : National jrride. Is militarism then the chief ingredient of patriotism ? Cannot a citizen feel an honest pride in the size, wealth, liberty, hap piness and peace of his country ? Must a nation become a

    great boastful boxer or fighter before it can command the respect of its citizens ?

    THE SIZE OF IT.

    We confess to feeling a little tired of the never-ending talk about the size of our country, especially the western part of it. When this territory is peopled, it will indeed demand attention from the philanthropist and the mis sionary, and to anticipate that time and forestall Satan is a present and vital duty. But our weariness arises from the emphasis put upon size, as if that were all. Not even population determines the relative importance of localities or communities. Looked at as missionary fields the census casts needed light. But looked at as a power, intellectual, moral and spiritual, many a sparsely populated town, undistinguished for commerce, manufac tures or wealth, is a peer to its city cousin. Goliaths do not always conquer.

    *4 Your great country** seemed to me an ironical expression in the mouths of certain friends abroad, as if bigness were our only remarkable attribute.

    The coming hours are open, yet pure and spotless re

    ceptacles for whatever you may deposit there. Let us start up and live. Here come the moments that cannot be had again ; some few may yet be filled with imperish able good.?James Martineau*

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    Article Contentsp. 139

    Issue Table of ContentsThe American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 51, No. 6 (NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1889), pp. 125-156Front MatterTHE BROTHERHOOD OF NATIONS. RESPONSE OF AMERICA TO THE WORLD'S DEMAND FOR LEADERSHIP [pp. 127-135]THE FRIENDS AND PEACE [pp. 135-135]INDIFFERENCE TO HUMAN MISERY [pp. 135-135]MAN'S INHUMANITY [pp. 136-136]THE WORLD'S EXPECTATION AND PRAYER [pp. 136-136]RIVALRY IN THE ARTS OF PEACE [pp. 136-136]THE ADVOCATE OF PEACE AND ARBITRATION: [Notes] [pp. 137-137]A BRITISH PEACE CAMPAIGN [pp. 137-137]THE LAST ABSURDITY [pp. 137-137]THE ALASKA WAR ON SEAL-CATCHERS [pp. 137-138]THE THREE AMERICAS [pp. 138-138]THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE [pp. 138-138]HOW WAR BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN WAS AVERTED [pp. 138-138]THE UNIVERSALISTS ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION [pp. 139-139]CHRISTIANITY VS. RUM AND OPIUM [pp. 139-139]SELLING NAVY YARDS [pp. 139-139]THE SIZE OF IT [pp. 139-139]OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES. ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY [pp. 140-140]THE WORK OF THE SOCIETY IN PARIS [pp. 140-140]A RELIGIOUS DISPUTE ADJUSTED [pp. 140-140]THE FIGHTING OF EARLY CHRISTIANS [pp. 140-140]THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OF 1892 AND PEACE [pp. 141-141]PROTESTANTS IN CHINA INDEBTED TO CATHOLICS [pp. 141-141]LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY [pp. 142-142]THE MASTER'S TOUCH [pp. 143-143]BOOK TABLEReview: untitled [pp. 143-143]Review: untitled [pp. 143-144]Review: untitled [pp. 144-144]

    THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION [pp. 144-144]DIARY OF THE SECRETARY [pp. 145-146]EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE [pp. 146-150]A GOLD MEDAL AWARDED TO A PEACE SOCIETY [pp. 150-150]LOCAL ORGANIZATION [pp. 150-150]THE MARITIME CONGRESS [pp. 150-150]BOYS' BRIGADES IN SCOTLAND [pp. 150-150]TWILIGHT [pp. 151-151]SECOND LETTER FROM JERUSALEM [pp. 151-152]BRAZIL [pp. 153-153]WHAT IS TRUTH? [pp. 153-153]A DYING MAN'S BEQUEST [pp. 153-153]Back Matter

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