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Timesaving Tools TEACHING TRANSPARENCIES · PDF fileChapter 2 Resources Timesaving Tools ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 10 ... warned of a “curse” on those who had opened the tomb

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Text of Timesaving Tools TEACHING TRANSPARENCIES · PDF fileChapter 2 Resources Timesaving Tools ... 1...

  • Chapter 2 ResourcesTimesaving Tools

    Interactive Teacher Edition Access your Teacher Wraparound Edition andyour classroom resources with a few easy clicks.

    Interactive Lesson Planner Planning has never been easier! Organize yourweek, month, semester, or year with all the lesson helps you need to maketeaching creative, timely, and relevant.

    Use GlencoesPresentation Plus!multimedia teacher tool to easily present

    dynamic lessons that visually excite your stu-dents. Using Microsoft PowerPoint you can customize the presentations to create your ownpersonalized lessons.

    The following videotape programs are available from Glencoe as supplements to Chapter 2:

    Cleopatra: Destinys Queen (ISBN 1-56501-4545) The Great Pharaohs of Egypt

    (ISBN 0-7670-02733) King Tut (Volumes 1 and 2) (ISBN 1-56501-2364) Great Pyramids of Giza and Other Pyramids

    (ISBN 07670-02075)

    Tomb of the Gods: The Great Pyramid(ISBN 0-7670-0081-1)

    To order, call Glencoe at 18003347344. To findclassroom resources to accompany many of thesevideos, check the following home pages:A&E Television: www.aande.comThe History Channel: www.historychannel.com

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    TEACHING TRANSPARENCIESTEACHING TRANSPARENCIESChapter Transparency 2 L2

    Graphic Organizer StudentActivity 2 Transparency L2

    What I Know What I Wantto Find Out What I LearnedHow Can ILearn More

    Graphic Organizer 2:K-W-L-H ChartCHAPTER TRANSPARENCY 2

    Western Asia and Egypt (3500500 B.C.)

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    Ancient Egypt

    N

    E

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    W

    35N

    40E

    30N

    25N

    20N

    30E 35E

    Mediterranean Sea

    Red Sea

    NileRiver

    Nile Delta

    0 100

    100

    200 mi.

    0 200 km

    1600 B.C.

    Beginning of New Kingdom

    1800 B.C.

    End of Middle Kingdom

    2050 B.C.

    Beginning of Middle Kingdom

    2200 B.C.

    End of Old Kingdom

    2700 B.C.

    Beginning of Old Kingdom

    3000 B.C.

    Narmer unites two kingdoms. Capital established at Memphis

    4000 B.C.

    Egypt divided into upper and lower kingdoms

    5000 B.C.

    Nomadic hunter-gatherers settle in Nile Valley

    1500B.C.

    2000B.C.

    4000B.C.

    5000B.C.

    3000B.C.

    Map Overlay Transparency 2

    Enrichment Activity 2 L3

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    Enrichment Activity 2

    deposited rich silt on the land, making itgood farmland.

    The Seasons of the Nile

    DIRECTIONS: Answer the questions below in the space provided.

    1. What is the main idea of the selection? _____________________________________________

    2. From what you have read about Egyptian civilization, how necessary was an abundantlabor force to prepare the fields for planting? _______________________________________

    3. Why do you think kings derived their power from their ability to predict the flood?

    4. Why do you think land closer to the river was more valuable? ________________________

    5. From what you have read about Egyptian religion, briefly describe the role water ingeneral, and the Nile in particular, might have played in the religion of ancient Egypt.

    Ancient civilizations developed nearrivers. When the rivers flooded, they

    The behavior of the Nile determined the seasons for farmers in ancient Egypt. Therewere really three seasons: inundation, receding waters, and drought. Inundationwas the period during which the Nile flooded. Afterwards, the flood waters receded,withdrawing from the fields. Farmers plowed the land and planted their crops duringthis time. Drought was the dry period, when farmers harvested their crops.

    Knowing in advance how much the Nile would flood was an important role of govern-ment, and much of the kings power came from their ability to accurately predict the extentof the floods. Good flooding meant abundant harvests; a low flood could mean famine. AsEgyptian civilization progressed, it became possible to move farther upstream to measurethe source of flooding and get earlier information on the extent of the years flood.

    Egyptian farmers devised a series of dams, levees, and canals to control the floodingriver. They built levees around villages to keep water out. They constructed earthen dams infields after the flood to keep water in long enough to enrich the soil. They dug canals andthen punctured the dams to allow water to flow into fields as needed. As a final method ofirrigation, they carried water by hand to distant fields not reached by the floods.

    The value of landhow heavily it was taxedwas determined by its proximity to theriver. Lowland fields that flooded naturally were the most prized. Those farther inlandthat needed to be flooded through irrigation were taxed at a lower rate.

    Primary Source Reading 2 L2

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    Finding Tutankhamens Tomb

    Popular interest in ancient Egypt soared with the discovery in 1922 ofthe sealed tomb of the young ruler Tutankhamen. Though King Tutwas actually a minor figure in history, the discovery influenced fashion,jewelry, home decoration, and even popular music. Sensational newspaperswarned of a curse on those who had opened the tomb.

    Well hidden in the rocks of the Valley of the Kings, near Thebes,Tutankhamens tomb was unusual because it was almost untouched by van-dals or grave robbers. Magnificent works of art and useful objects, rich withgold and gems, were found with the young pharaoh. Veteran British archaeol-ogist Howard Carter had spent more than ten years searching for the tomb ofTutankhamen. The find was a last-chance triumph, for Carters sponsor, LordCarnarvon, was ready to abandon the project.

    This reading is from Carters own story of what he saw when he firstopened Tutankhamens tomb. At this point, workers at the dig had spentweeks clearing out blocked-up stairways and passages cut into the rock cliffswhere royal tombs were placed.

    Guided Reading In this selection, read to learn what Carter discovered in Tutankhamens tomb.

    The day following (November 26th) was theday of days, the most wonderful that I have everlived through. . . . Throughout the morning thework of clearing continued, slowly . . . onaccount of the delicate objects that were mixedwith the filling [in the passageway]. Then, in themiddle of the afternoon, 30 feet down from theouter door, we came upon a second sealeddoorway . . . behind it was the answer to thequestion.

    . . . With trembling hands I made a tinybreach in the upper left hand corner [of thedoor]. Darkness and blank space, as far as aniron testing-rod could reach, showed that what-ever lay beyond was empty. . . . Widening thehole a little, I inserted the candle and peeredin. . . . At first I could see nothing, the hot airescaping from the chamber causing the candleflame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grewaccustomed to the light, details of the roomwithin emerged slowly from the mist, strangeanimals, statues, and goldeverywhere theglint of gold.

    For the momentan eternity it must haveseemed to the others standing byI was struckdumb with amazement. When Lord Carnarvon,unable to stand the suspense any longer,

    inquired anxiously, Can you see anything?, itwas all I could do to get out the words, Yes,wonderful things! Then widening the hole a lit-tle further, so that we both could see, we insert-ed an electric torch [flashlight]. . . .

    Gradually the scene grew clearer, and wecould pick out individual objects. First, rightopposite to us . . . were three great gilt couches,their sides carved in the form of monstrous ani-mals [leopards] . . . with heads of startling real-ism. . . . Next, on the right, two statues caughtand held our attention: two life-sized figures of aking in black, facing each other like sentinels,gold kilted, gold sandalled. . . .

    These were the dominant objects that caughtthe eye at first. Between them, around them,piled on top of them, there were countless oth-ersexquisitely painted and inlaid caskets[boxes with lids]; alabaster vases, some beauti-fully carved . . . ; strange black shrines, from theopen door of one a great gilt snake peeping out;bouquets of flowers or leaves; beds; chairs beau-tifully carved; a golden inlaid throne; . . . on theleft a confused pile of overturned chariots, glis-tening with gold and inlay; and peeping frombehind them another portrait of a king.

    . . . Presently it dawned upon our

    P R I M A R Y S O U R C E R E A D I N G 2

    APPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTAPPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTHistory SimulationActivity 2 L1

    Introduction by host (30 seconds):

    Ideas of topics to be discussed in talk (34 minutes):

    Questions from host or audience (1 minute):

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    HANDOUT MATERIAL

    Talking HeadsPlanning Worksheet

    Select one of these pairs for your talk show.

    Phoenician alphabet inventor and Ashurbanipal Moses and Zoroaster

    Egyptian merchant and Persian road engineer Nebuchadnezzar and Solomon

    Phoenician sailor and Chaldean stargazer

    Actors Props Master Audience memberswith questions

    Other

    Host Director Publicity

    Name Date Class

    2H I S T O R YS I M U L A T I O NAC T I V I T Y

    Historical SignificanceActivity 2 L2

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    Hammurabis code was a great innova-tion of Mesopotamian civilization. The codeprovid