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Understanding and managing challenging behaviors Mickey VanDerwerker August 2011 [email protected]

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Text of Understanding and managing challenging behaviors Mickey VanDerwerker August 2011 [email protected]

  • Understanding and managing challenging behaviorsMickey VanDerwerker August 2011 [email protected]

  • Where we startAll behavior communicatesBehavior is taught and learnedWe bring our own issues into the behavior danceGroup strategies before individual strategiesDevelopmental levels, diagnosis and temperament matter

  • All behavior communicates. All behavior communicates. We dont have to like how the message is being sent. Our behavior communicates too.

  • Behavior is taught and learned.

  • We bring our own issues to the behavior dance.What behaviors push your hot buttons?

  • Family issues first.Are their other family behaviors that need to be addressed?Relationships matter the most!

  • After a hasty special education placement for behavior problems, school officials were embarrassed to learn that Marty really did have ants in his pants.Developmental levels, diagnosis and temperament matterThe terrible twos.Hes always moving. Shes stubborn.Temperament website and book

  • What will work for your family?Is this idea reasonable for my child?TemperamentDevelopmental needsDiagnosisIs this idea reasonable for me?TemperamentYour experienceWays to overcome your issues

  • Identify the behavior(s).

    Determine why they are happening (the message).

    Environmental supports

    Teaching replacement behaviors that work

    Reacting in ways that make things better

    Making sure that your plan is working

  • Say what the behavior looks like, not what you think it means.

    Irritable rubbing his faceaggressive hits the adults armupset pulling his hairnon-compliant doesnt look when his name is called

  • Aggression Tantrum Noncompliance Hitting ThreateningScratching PinchingKicking BitingThrowing thingsScreamingCryingWhiningCussing Refuses to respond to a requestPassive when a request is made Social WithdrawalSelf injury/ Repetitive BehaviorsOthers?

    Primarily plays aloneDoesnt respond to peers attempts to playScratching selfBiting selfHitting selfRocking back & forth Spinning objects

  • Determining the message behind the behaviorsPay attention to meLook at me, Im sillyPlay with meI want _____I dont want to do this anymoreI dont understandStop

  • More messagesI want outHelp me; Im frustratedYou used to give it to me; I want it nowIm not getting the input I needIm boredIm tense, anxious, nervous, excited, overwhelmedIm hurt, sick, tired

  • Who what when where whyWhat: define the behavior Why: identify the message When, where and who: recognize patterns Who: which of you needs to make changes?

  • Setting up the environment to support behaviors you want to encourage and prevent behaviors you want to avoid.

  • High rates of positive interactionsAppropriate expectationsKeeping busySupervision and supportBalanced daily scheduleSetting limits clearlyFacilitate transitionsSpace and room arrangementsStructure and routines

    This is a sample of environmental supports.

  • Supervision and supportMan-to-man or zone defense?What do the other adults in the house need to know and do?

  • Teaching replacement behaviorsThese have to be as easy as the original behavior.They have to work as effectively.

    Skill deficitPerformance deficit

    Learning new behaviors takes time.

  • Teaching new behaviorsUse your words, gestures, eyes, fingers, picturesDevelop higher level skillsCoping and self-managementTeaching the routines and the rules of the roomRewarding approximationsScripted stories and dramatic play

  • Using multiple strategies to support appropriate behavior

  • Reacting in ways that helpThe goal is not to punish. The goal is to move on.Consequences can be used fairly and reasonably:The child must have the ability to avoid the consequencesThe child must know that the consequence existsThe powerful behavior changers are environmental supports and teaching new behaviors

  • Effects of punishmentPunishment suppresses behavior but doesnt eliminate itPunishment suppresses only in the presence of the punisherPunishment teaches children to associate punishment with the punisher and not with their behaviorPunishment produces emotional side effects which lowers childrens self-esteemPunishment does not guide the child to appropriate behaviorPunishment produces aggression in childrenPunishment can increase a childs desire to persist in a behavior (a power struggle)Punishment does not help kids learn self-disciplinePunishment models power-assertive ways to solve problems

  • Planning your responsePredict and preventIgnore but respondDistraction/redirectionOffer a substituteChange your automatic responsesChange the scenePresenting feedbackContingent instructionTime-awayActive listeningStrategic capitulationCrisis management plans

  • Predict and preventSee it coming? What can you do to prevent it or to minimize it?

  • Behavior is not learned overnight.

    It wont change overnight.

  • Extra information

  • Setting up the environment to support behaviors you want to encourage and prevent behaviors you want to avoid.

  • High rates of positive interactionsAppropriate expectationsKeeping busySupervision and supportBalanced daily scheduleSetting limits clearly

    This is a sample of environmental supports.

  • High rates of positive interactionsPennies in your pocket

    Doesnt have to be I like the way

    Talking in front of kids

  • Appropriate expectationsDevelopmental levels, temperament, diagnosisHelping kids by counter-regulating and counter-balancing emotional reactions

  • You can keep them busy orNot too easy/not too hard

  • Supervision and supportMan-to-man or zone defense?What do the other adults in the house need to know and do?

  • Balanced daily schedule

  • Setting limits clearlyConsistencyPractice Consistency

  • Teaching replacement behaviorsThese have to be as easy as the original behavior.They have to work as effectively.

    Skill deficitPerformance deficit

    Learning new behaviors takes time.

  • Teaching new behaviorsUse your words, gestures, eyes, fingers, picturesDevelop higher level skillsCoping and self-managementTeaching the routines and the rules of the roomRewarding approximationsScripted stories and dramatic play

  • Using multiple strategies to support appropriate behavior

  • The Chocolate Covered Cookie Tantrum

  • Reacting in ways that helpThe goal is not to punish. The goal is to move on.Consequences can be used fairly and reasonably:The child must have the ability to avoid the consequencesThe child must know that the consequence existsThe powerful behavior changers are environmental supports and teaching new behaviors

  • Effects of punishmentPunishment suppresses behavior but doesnt eliminate itPunishment suppresses only in the presence of the punisherPunishment teaches children to associate punishment with the punisher and not with their behaviorPunishment produces emotional side effects which lowers childrens self-esteemPunishment does not guide the child to appropriate behaviorPunishment produces aggression in childrenPunishment can increase a childs desire to persist in a behavior (a power struggle)Punishment does not help kids learn self-disciplinePunishment models power-assertive ways to solve problems

  • Planning your responsePredict and preventIgnore but respondDistraction/redirectionOffer a substituteChange your automatic responsesChange the scenePresenting feedbackContingent instructionTime-awayActive listeningStrategic capitulationCrisis management plans

  • Predict and preventSee it coming? What can you do to prevent it or to minimize it?

  • Predict and preventPut stuff away that causes problemsBe close to kids who will struggleIntermittent one-to-one (for a child or for a specific toy)Get the childs attention and say what you want (touch gently, not dont hit)Offer two yeses for each no (two ways to do what he wants to do: you can hammer on the floor or on the bench but not on the window)

  • Ignore but respond

    Ignore the form of the behavior but not the messageState what you want to see using an I messageSome kids need up close and personal when they are upsetSome kids need close but not touching

  • Distraction/RedirectionRedirection has been accomplished when the student is back on task. The redirection curveKids who are persistent..

  • Offer a substituteA form of distraction/redirectionOffer choices of what the child can have Show the child when he can have what he wants

  • Change your automatic responseIdentify your automatic response, particularly for hot button issuesPlan a different response

  • Change the sceneA good strategy in predict and prevent Moving to another area to calm the child/children downLook at your schedule and see if changes are required for environmental supports

  • Present feedbackRemind the child what will happen if he engages in the behavior and what will happen if he doesnt (this is not a time for long discussions)Offer choices to redirect him into more productive behaviorVisual supports can be useful

  • Contingent instructionHelping the child to complete the task appropriately so that he can see the whole pictureOnce youve provided this instruction, praise and encourage for next time

  • Time away

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