Vet Practice April 2015

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  • APRIL 2015 $6.95 GST INCL.

    PRACTICE

    An in-depth investigation covering the facts from vets and horse owners, page 18

    SPECIAL REPORTOur guide to the best products at the 2015

    Vet Nurses Council of Australia conference,

    page 29

    Lean on meDevelopments in prosthetics for dogs, page 10

    Out of townersContinuing Professional Development for rural vets, page 14

    Digital designLearn how to brand your image online, page 22

    The vaccination debate

    Hendra

  • PREVICOX EXCEEDINGEXPECTATIONS

    MOVING AHEAD IN OA

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    1. Refer to PREVICOX product label for full claim details. 2. Merial Data on File, PR&D 84101. 3. McCann, M.E., Andersen, D.R., & Zhang, D. et al (2004) In vitro activity and in vivo effi cacy of a novel COX-2 inhibitor in dogs. Am J Vet Res 65 :502-512 * When used according to label directions. Merial Australia Pty Ltd, Building D, 12-24 Talavera Road, Macquarie Park, NSW 2113. ABN 53 071 187 285. PREVICOX is a registered trademark of Merial. 2015 Merial Limited. All rights reserved. PREV.15.02.0051.

    PREVICOX RELIEVES PAIN WITH Once daily dosing - with or without food1

    Fast acting comfort - peak plasma levels achieved within90 minutes of dosing2

    Safety - high COX-2 selectivity while sparing COX-1 at therapeutic doses3*

    Dogs suffering from osteoarthritis need proven relief from pain and infl ammation.

    Prev Exceed Exp Trade ad_Provet.indd 1 31/03/2015 9:27 am

  • APRIL 2015

    News + eventsJames Cook University collaboration 4JCU has a joint venture with Greencross Vets; scent-trained dog detects human thyroid cancer; saving Barry the turtle, and much more

    Cover storyInside the Hendra vaccination debate 18With growing concern over the safety of the Hendra vaccine, we talk to veterinarians and horse owners to get all the facts

    Your worldShake a leg 10Prosthetic and orthotic appliance options for dogs

    Your businessCPD options for rural vets 14Continuing professional development options for rural vets are greater than ever before

    Image makeover 22All you need to know about Instagram and Pinterest

    15 ways to go green 26Simple ways to make your practice eco-friendly

    Your toolsNew products 8The latest and greatest gear for your practice

    Product guide 29Vet Practice magazines guide to the best products at the 2015 Veterinary Nurses Council of Australia Conference

    Tools of the trade 35Reviewed by your peers

    Your lifeIce queen 38When Dr Silvia Sugiyama of Melton Veterinary Clinic in Victoria tried figure skating for the first time, she knew she had found her passion

    Contents

    CONTENTS

    18

    14

    26 38

    PRACTICE Editorial Director Rob Johnson

    Sub-editor Kerryn Ramsey

    Editor Nicole Hogan

    Digital Director Ann Gordon

    Art Director Lucy Glover

    Contributors Chris Sheedy, Fiona MacDonald, Natasha Shaw, Deborah Rubin Fields

    Commercial Director Mark Brown

    For all editorial or advertising enquiries:Phone (02) 9660 6995 Fax (02) 9518 5600info@vetpracticemag.com.au

    Vet Practice magazine is published 11 times a year by Engage Media, Suite 4.17, 55 Miller Street, Pyrmont NSW 2009. ABN 50 115 977 421. Views expressed in Vet Practice magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or Engage Media. Printed by Webstar.

    22

    10

    Sales Director Adam Cosgrove

    4,517 - CAB Audited as at September 2014

    PREVICOX EXCEEDINGEXPECTATIONS

    MOVING AHEAD IN OA

    - C

    red

    its:

    JM

    Lab

    at

    1. Refer to PREVICOX product label for full claim details. 2. Merial Data on File, PR&D 84101. 3. McCann, M.E., Andersen, D.R., & Zhang, D. et al (2004) In vitro activity and in vivo effi cacy of a novel COX-2 inhibitor in dogs. Am J Vet Res 65 :502-512 * When used according to label directions. Merial Australia Pty Ltd, Building D, 12-24 Talavera Road, Macquarie Park, NSW 2113. ABN 53 071 187 285. PREVICOX is a registered trademark of Merial. 2015 Merial Limited. All rights reserved. PREV.15.02.0051.

    PREVICOX RELIEVES PAIN WITH Once daily dosing - with or without food1

    Fast acting comfort - peak plasma levels achieved within90 minutes of dosing2

    Safety - high COX-2 selectivity while sparing COX-1 at therapeutic doses3*

    Dogs suffering from osteoarthritis need proven relief from pain and infl ammation.

    Prev Exceed Exp Trade ad_Provet.indd 1 31/03/2015 9:27 am

  • 4

    news + events

    Greencross Vets has commenced the provision of management services for James Cook Universitys veterinary emergency centre and hospital, JCU Vet, in Townsville, Queensland. The new structure will offer better opportunities for students, will attract leading vet specialists, teachers and clinicians, will provide access to new technologies, and will increase the scale and scope of veterinary services offered in north Queensland.

    JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski said the

    agreement will benefit veterinary students.

    Students will have access to placement opportunities within Greencrosss network, which extends from Cairns to Adelaide. It will also give access to new technologies, wider training options and exposure to the financial discipline necessary to manage a practice, said Professor Wronski.

    Greencross chief operations officer Dr Ian Kadish said the arrangement will help JCU to produce exceptional work-ready graduates for the vet industry.

    Its exciting for JCU students to be able to access clinical cases across the Greencross network, as well as JCUs vet hospital, said Dr Kadish.

    Professor Wronski said the arrangement will also help restore the vet schools financial stability.

    Greencross brings professional acumen and financial rigour to the business, he said.

    The north Queensland community will also benefit from improved services at JCUs vet hospital. The opening hours for Townsvilles only animal hospital emergency centre will be expanded.

    JCU Vet will have access to improved pathology services, enhanced imaging capabilities and will be able to draw on Greencrosss staff throughout Australia.

    Dr Kadish said JCU Vet will remain independent and will continue to seek and take referrals from its referring partners in the north Queensland veterinary community.

    Greencross also sees this initiative as a mechanism whereby the company can play its part and contribute to the broader veterinary industry and its academic institutions.

    We understand that JCU needs to operate as a high quality, independent facility taking specialty and emergency referrals in the north Queensland region, and Greencross will ensure that the business runs independently, and maintains its commitment to teaching, research and academic excellence.

    A trained scent dog accurately identified whether patients urine samples had thyroid cancer or were benign (noncancerous) 88.2 per cent of the time, according to a study presented at the Endocrine Societys annual meeting in San Diego, USA.

    Current diagnostic procedures for thyroid cancer often yield uncertain results, leading to recurrent medical procedures and a large number of thyroid surgeries performed unnecessarily, said the studys senior investigator, Dr Donald Bodenner of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).

    Scent-trained canines could be used by physicians to detect the presence of thyroid cancer at an early stage and to avoid surgery when unwarranted, said Dr Bodenner.

    Although hes not yet basing patient treatment decisions on the canine technique,

    he said the dogs diagnostic accuracy is only slightly less than that of fine-needle aspiration biopsy, the method generally used first to test thyroid nodules for cancer. Canine scent detection has the advantages of being noninvasive and inexpensive.

    Dr Bodenners colleague at UAMS and study-coauthor Dr Arny Ferrando previously imprinted, or scent-trained, a rescued male German shepherd-mix named Frankie to recognise the smell of cancer in thyroid tissue obtained from multiple patients. Dr Ferrando, who noted that dogs have at least 10 times more smell receptors than humans do, said, Frankie is the first dog trained to differentiate benign thyroid disease from thyroid cancer by smelling a persons urine.

    In this study, 34 patients gave a urine sample at their first visit before they went

    on to have a biopsy of suspicious thyroid nodules and surgery. The surgical pathology result was diagnosed as cancer in 15 patients and benign thyroid disease in 19. These urine samples were presented, by a gloved dog handler, one at a time to Frankie to sniff. Neither the dog handler nor the study coordinator, who recorded the dogs responses, knew the cancer status of the 34 urine samples.

    The handler interspersed some urine samples that had a known cancer status so he could reward the dog for correct answers.

    The dogs alert matched the final surgical pathology diagnosis in 30 of the 34 study samples. The sensitivity, or true-positive rate, was 86.7 per cent, meaning Frankie correctly identified nearly 87 per cent of the pathology-proven thyroid cancers. The specificitythe true-negative ratewas 89.5 per cent, which meant Frankie knew that a benign sample was actually benign almost nine of every 10 times.

    Scent-trained dog detects human thyroid cancer

    James Cook University vet hospital collaboration

    Tennille Steffensen, business manager

    of JCU Vet

    Frankie.

  • One simple ruleNVC puts people first and in return expects you to put clients first. Every NVC clinic has a responsibility to provide superior customer service. We appreciate that this is not always easy but is imperative for the reputation and success of everyone. This fundamental requirement is just good manners and good business.

    Differentiation of NVC are:

    Branding and Expertise Practice and the staff retain

    their identity and the client relationships

    NVC supports back-end functions with superior systems, allowing focus to be applied to clinical delivery

    NVC supports the team to facilitate the best customer service, delivery of higher standards of care and aims to achieve high levels of employee satisfaction

    Best Practice Training Rather than the broader pet

    industry, our focus is on

    professional veterinary services Our primary objective is to raise

    Clinical Standards and be a centre of excellence

    Customised and tailored training programs will be implemented for veterinarians and nurses

    Veterinary Advisory Board A Veterinary Advisory Board,

    made up of experienced vets with specialist skills, will help develop and support the training syllabus and quality of service delivery across the group

    NVC_VetPractice_halfpage_185x127_v2.indd 1 28/01/15 2:10 PM

    A message from our CEO Tomas SteenackersWe are committed to actively listening to veterinary experts so that we can ensure our community is better supported. Motivation should come from being part of something better not by fear or pressure to focus on numbers instead of patient care. We are building something special that is and always will be focused on caring for our people.

    At National Veterinary Care (NVC) we focus on our well-respected veterinary professionals that love caring for pets and assisting pet parents. NVC are partnering with high-quality established veterinary clinics that want to benefit from the support and advantages that come from our group.

    To find out more please visit our website www.nvcvets.con.au or contact us 1300 NVC Vets directly for a confidential discussion.

  • 6

    news + events

    The University of Queenslands Moreton Bay Research Station, the Quandamooka Rangers, Sea World, and the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service all worked together to save a 49-centimetre turtle, who had a severe case of floating syndrome.

    Moreton Bay Research Station education officer Dr Kathy Townsend said Barry the turtle was so listless that when she first saw him, she initially thought he had died in transport.

    He was suffering from extreme dehydration and about half his scutesthe large scales covering the shellhad severe UV damage and had lifted off, Dr Townsend said.

    Luckily the Quandamooka Rangers who found him brought him straight to the station to undergo triage care.

    Dr Townsend immediately placed Barry on several rehydrating drips in an attempt to revive him. The change was spectacular. He went from near-

    dead to lifting his head to check us out, she said.

    Floating syndrome occurs when a turtles gut becomes paralysed, preventing it from being able to digest food.

    Instead, the food decomposes, releasing gases that get caught in the body cavity, causing them to float.

    The condition occurs either from a parasite infection or from swallowing marine debris like plastic bags or balloons, Dr Townsend said.

    Turtles with floating syndrome cant absorb water, so they quickly dehydrate and because they cant dive underwater, theyre often attacked by other animals, hit by boats or severely sunburnt.

    Once Barry was stabilised, the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service took him to Sea World for a full assessment and antibiotic treatment. He will spend several weeks at Sea

    World fattening up and undergoing rehabilitation under veterinary supervision, Dr Townsend said.

    Its wonderful how Queenslands marine conservation community works together on these cases.

    Once Barry is back to full health we will release him back to the ocean, so he can hopefully live a long and happy life.

    A week after Barry was treated at Moreton Bay Research Station, a second turtle, Billy, arrived with similar symptoms, highlighting the need to keep plastic and other rubbish out of the ocean.

    Billy recently joined Barry at Sea World and is expected to make a full recovery.

    Daisy, a one-year-old female spayed pit bull/basset hound mix, was recently surrendered to the Yolo County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) in California, USA, after her owners suspected she had become paralysed. Ashley Carr, a staff member at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) and SPCA volunteer, noticed that Daisy was still able to wag her tail, which would indicate that she wasnt completely paralysed. Carr contacted the VMTHs Neurology and Neurosurgery Service to see if there was anything UC Davis could do to help Daisy.

    Once at UC Davis, Daisy was given a physical examination by Drs Peter Dickinson and Jessica Rivera for further evaluation of her inability to walk. Daisys spinal X-rays showed evidence of an old vertebral fracture,

    and an MRI and blood and urine cultures found changes suggestive of an infectious process in the region of the old fracture site. Without doing these tests, Drs Dickinson and Rivera would not have been able to diagnose Daisys medical problem, and Daisy most likely would have died from the infection.

    To treat the infection, Daisy was given a lengthy regiment of antibiotics. Within just a few days of Daisys first dose of antibiotics, Carrwho is now fostering Daisyreported that she was trying to walk.

    After a week, she was walking. Now after a month of antibiotics, Daisy is running around like her old self. She will require follow-up X-rays and remain on antibiotics for at least three to four months to clear the infection....