Vet Practice December 2015

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  • Following years spent as a vet in Malawi, Dr Reb reflects on the

    lessons learned abroad

    African adventure

    DECEMBER 2015 $6.95 GST INCL.

    Life as an OPVNew programs are encouraging graduates to explore work as an on-plant vet

    Going mobileGood design extends beyond brick-and-mortar practices to those on the road

    Looking forward

    Make 2016 successful with these healthy

    habits

  • Go to idexxsdma.info or join the conversation on Linkedin for more details #IDEXXSDMA

    * Blood profiles run at the IDEXX Reference Laboratory. Excludes in-house diagnostic profiles.

    IDEXX SDMA ...one giant leap for veterinary medicine

    Trusted by specialists, NATA accredited and IRIS endorsed

    IDEXX SDMA IS PROVEN TO ENABLE THE EARLY AND SPECIFIC IDENTIFICATION OF RENAL DYSFUNCTION.

    AVAILABLE TO IDEXX CUSTOMERS IN BLOOD PROFILES* AT NO EXTRA COST.

    EXCLUSIVE TO

    IDEXX

    The Complete Diagnostic Solution 2015 IDEXX Laboratories. Inc. All rights reserved. All / marks are owned by IDEXX, Inc or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. The IDEXX Privacy Policy is available at idexx.com

  • DECEMBER 2015

    Cover storyOut of Africa 20A young vet on a two-year stint in the Peace Corp, Dr Rebs memoir takes us to Africa and back in the first of our four-part series.

    News + eventsThe latest in the veterinary world 4Hendra virus shoot em upvaccine objectors pressure Queensland vets, and more.

    Your worldThe secret life of OPVs 12Tucked away in the hidden places where pigs become pork, we entrust our health to on-plant vets every time we eat meat.

    Your businessCulture change 16Learn how to make your small practice rival the likes of Google and Facebook for workplace happiness.

    Beating burnout 26With one in seven vets suffering burnout within 10 years of graduating, taking steps to prevent it should be number one on your to-do list.

    On the road 30Mobile vets are trading bricks and mortar for a more flexibleand affordablepractice.

    Your toolsNew products 11The latest tools and equipment on the market.

    Tools of the trade 35Reviewed by real-life vets around Australia.

    Your lifeSpin cycle 38When Dr Kirstie Mientka knocks off at work, she jumps on a bike and leads the pack at her local spin studio.

    Contents

    CON TENTS

    12

    20

    30 38

    PRACTICE Editorial Director Rob Johnson

    Digital Director Ann Gordon

    Contributors Tracey Porter, Sarah Norris, Chris Sheedy, Kerryn Ramsey

    Commercial Director Mark Brown

    For all editorial or advertising enquiries:Phone (02) 9660 6995 Fax (02) 9518 5600info@vetpracticemag.com.au

    Vet Practice magazine is published 11 times a year by Engage Media, Suite 4.06, 55 Miller Street, Pyrmont NSW 2009. ABN 50 115 977 421. Views expressed in Vet Practice magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or Engage Media. Printed by Webstar.

    26

    16

    Sales Director Adam Cosgrove

    4,883 - CAB Audited as at September 2015

    Sub-editor Kate Balazs

    Editor Erin Delaney

    Art Director Lucy GloverGo to idexxsdma.info or join

    the conversation on Linkedin for more details #IDEXXSDMA

    * Blood profiles run at the IDEXX Reference Laboratory. Excludes in-house diagnostic profiles.

    IDEXX SDMA ...one giant leap for veterinary medicine

    Trusted by specialists, NATA accredited and IRIS endorsed

    IDEXX SDMA IS PROVEN TO ENABLE THE EARLY AND SPECIFIC IDENTIFICATION OF RENAL DYSFUNCTION.

    AVAILABLE TO IDEXX CUSTOMERS IN BLOOD PROFILES* AT NO EXTRA COST.

    EXCLUSIVE TO

    IDEXX

    The Complete Diagnostic Solution 2015 IDEXX Laboratories. Inc. All rights reserved. All / marks are owned by IDEXX, Inc or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. The IDEXX Privacy Policy is available at idexx.com

  • 4

    news + events

    New guidelines set to preserve antibiotic efficacy in horses and livestockIn the wake of fears surrounding the depreciating efficacy of antimicrobial medicines the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) and Animal Medicines Australia (AMA) are developing a new set of guidelines to govern antibiotic prescriptions for livestock and horses.

    The AVAs CEO Graham Catt encouraged veterinarians to contribute to policies that could help to minimise the detrimental over prescription of antibiotics.

    All prescribers, users and suppliers of antibiotics need to work together to manage antimicrobial resistance and extend the usefulness of our lifesaving antibiotics, said Catt. We are working in partnership with others to provide easily-accessible, clinically-useful antibiotic prescribing guidelines for all the main species treated by veterinarians in Australia.

    Catt was optimistic about producing the guidelines as a measure to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

    Antibiotic prescribing guidelines for vet practices, livestock and other animal producers will standardise and optimise the use of antibiotics, improving treatment outcomes and minimising resistance in these settings, said Catt.

    Though the guidelines will take three years to produce, Duncan Bremner, CEO of the AMA is optimistic about both their implantation and impact.

    There are already Australian evidence-based guidelines for dogs and cats. With this project kicking off in 2016, we will now also have guidelines for horses, sheep, pigs, poultry and cattle, said Bremner.

    The guidelines will be based on the best available peer-reviewed scientific evidence and will follow responsible prescribing principles. Both animal and human health experts play a critical role in preserving these lifesaving drugs for the future. This project will be a significant step to further improve antimicrobial stewardship in Australia.

    Queensland politician, Jim Pearce, the Labour member for Mirani, has put himself forward as the voice for horse owners against Hendra Vaccinations. The Equine Veterinary Association (EVA) has rebutted Pearces claims with concerns around health and safety.

    Local veterinarians are being pressured by Pearce and his compatriots to treat horses regardless of their vaccination status.

    Pearces platform suggests vets refusals to treat unvaccinated horses is a coercive tactic intended to enforce vaccinations.

    To say, I will not be treating your horse unless it has been vaccinated against Hendra virus is a standover tactic and being used by vets to force people to get their horses vaccinated, says Pearce. Vets can say that if they are fair dinkum, but they are not being fair dinkum.

    In the wake of the recent prosecutions by Workplace Health and Safety the legality of equine treatment without vaccination has concerned local vets. Though vets would put themselves, horses and others at risk by treating an unvaccinated horse Pearce insinuated that health and safety was not the reason behind vet recalcitrance.

    I dont believe this argument is about PPE [personal protective equipment]. There has to be something else that puts these vets in a situation where they say they wont treat horses unless they have been vaccinated, says Pearce. I dont have the evidence to back up what Ive been hearing, but there are certainly things put to me that question the whole exercise.

    Dr Nathan Anthony, from the Equine Veterinary Association refuted Pearces claims citing impacts the Hendra virus has imparted on the community.

    Veterinarians have lost colleagues to this disease and many veterinarians, along with horse owners, have been through the extreme stress of waiting to find out if they have contracted the disease, Dr Anthony told the ABC.

    Hendra is not solely a risk to veterinarians. In the last year, six horse owners have been treated with monoclonal antibodies as Queensland Health deemed them to have high risk of contracting the virus.

    Hendra virus shoot em upvaccine objectors pressure Queensland vets

  • A groundbreakingadvancement in

    canine cardiology is now in your hands.

    Vetmedin is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica GmbH. Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Limited, 2015. All rights reserved. WH BI20019/VP_1

    BI20019 Vetmedin-PreClinical-Vet Consec-RHPs_VP.indd 1 13/11/15 4:10 PM

  • 6

    news + events

    New study finds early desexing does not increase the risk of complications for kittensWhile the debate has been back and forth on the right age to desex kittens, a new study has found that desexing within three months could reduce the number of cats euthanased.

    Researchers also found that desexing could be safely performed before kittens reached three months of age. Though the operation is usually performed at around the six-month mark, kittens become fertile closer to three months.

    Some shelters and vets are already desexing kittens as early as two months old. Associate Professor of feline medicine at the University of Sydney, Vanessa Barrs, told the ABC that it was still common for vets to wait six months to desex kittens.

    However, Professor Barrs and her researchers followed 300 operations

    and found that desexing prior to 12 weeks no longer increased the risk of complications.

    Traditionally there were risks associated with doing surgery and anaesthesia in young animals, but technology and expertise has changed over the years, she said.

    Professor Barrs is now working with the the Cat Protection Society to reduce numbers of euthanased cats Australia wide. Currently shelters take in 100,000 cats per annumzmost of which are euthanased.

    CEO of the Cat Protection Society of NSW, Kristina Vesk, hopes to minimise the large numbers of unwanted cats and kittens being put

    down. Its really important to stop that cycle of breeding right up front, said Vesk. Thats why early age desexing is so important. We can actually start to tackle the problem because its a tragedy that all these beautiful healthy cats and kittens are being euthanased.

    Methane minimisation in cattle productionResearchers in New Zealand are on the verge of testing a vaccine for cattle that will greatly reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Cattle are one of the largest producers of methane in Australia and New Zealand. Their burps produce gases greatly responsible for driving up greenhouse gas emissions.

    Rick Pridmore, strategy and investment leader for sustainability

    at Dairy NZ, was hopeful that vaccine production would result in a 25 to 30 per cent reduction in methane emissions by cattle. Were getting very close to coming up with a possible vaccine and we are doing animal testing right now, Pridmore told ABC Rural. But close in science can always be quite unsettling, if you say you are close the next experiment can

    show you did not get there.We do have in-vivo

    tests happening right now though, and we are probably as close as I feel we have been. We should know around Christmas or a little bit after how we have gone.

    As Pridmore explained the vaccine will work by creating an environment where the body itself will

    attack methane-producing bacteria in the stomach known as methanogens.

    Basically, you try to find a protein or a peptide that is on these methanogens, Pridmore said. You then create an auto-immune response to that, so the body attacks itself.

    The New Zealand vaccine is not alone. Researchers in Europe have been working on a methane inhibitor too.

    While we were doing that, a European company came out with a compound that can lower methane by about 25 per cent, which is very very high, says Pridmore.

    The inhibitor works on total mixed rations, or a dry diet, which is typically not a pasture diet. So were working with that company now to see if theirs will work on a pasture diet, which would be more applicable to Australia and New Zealand.

  • *Compared to placebo p=0.0088. **Compared to placebo, p=0.034. Reference: 1. Summerfield NJ, Boswood A, OGrady MR, et al. Efficacy of pimobendan in the prevention of congestive heart

    failure or sudden death in Doberman Pinschers with preclinical dilated cardiomyopathy (the PROTECT study). J Vet Intern Med. 2012;26(1):13371349. vetmedin.com.au or vetmedin.co.nz User name: veterinarian Password: livelonger Australia: Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Limited. Animal Health Division.

    Level 1, 78 Waterloo Road, North Ryde, NSW 2113. Toll Free 1800 038 037. New Zealand: Boehringer Ingelheim (N.Z.) Limited. Animal Health Division. Level 1, Unit 9, 42 Ormiston Road, East Tamaki, Auckland 2016. Toll Free 0800 802 461. Restricted Veterinary Medicine. Access is only through a veterinary authorisation. Vetmedin contains pimobendan.

    Vetmedin is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica GmbH. Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Limited, 2015. All rights reserved. WH BI20019/VP_2

    N E W I N D I C AT I O N

    Preclinicaldilated cardiomyopathy

    (DCM)

    Giving dogs more life to live only with Vetmedin

    With a new indication for preclinical dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), Vetmedin helps you alter the course of heart failure before it even starts.The PROTECT study in preclinical DCM found that Vetmedin provided:

    heart size reduction in approximately 30 days1

    delayed onset of clinical signs by 63%1* increased overall survival time by 34%1**

    Now you can alter the course of heart failure before it even starts.

    BI20019 Vetmedin-PreClinical-Vet Consec-RHPs_VP.indd 2 13/11/15 4:11 PM

  • 8

    news + events

    3D app will guide veterinary students through cows anatomyResearchers at the University of Illinois have developed an app that allows for the internal organs and bones of a cow to be viewed from all angles.

    The app was conceived of when medical illustrator in veterinary medicine at Illinois University, Janet Sinn-Hanlon, came across a dinosaur DNA app. That original app, created by associate director in computer-human interaction, Alan Craig, allows users to interact with dinosaur DNA molecules by looking through the app at a magazine.

    Sinn-Hanlon and research partner Kerry Helms, coordinator of graphic design in veterinary medicine, teamed up with Craig to use this technology to create an app for veterinary students.

    The app uses the camera lens to collect data about the position of the magazine in relation to the viewer, constructing a 3D image. Were using computer vision, the tablet, the phone as a magic lens, said Craig. Were looking at the real world through the camera of this device.

    The team designed the app to offer veterinary students the chance to conceptualise a cows anatomy. Thats difficult, especially on a really large animal. Youre used to looking at a textbook and an illustrator might have several views all on one page, said Helms. But to really put that all together in your head is kind of challenging. So the exciting part for us is the students can actually look at this and turn it around on their own.

    The new app is not confined to a stationary page, with students able to walk around, capturing a view of a cows anatomy from every angle. There is so much stuffed inside of a body. Its very compact, said Sinn-Hanlon. If youre going to go on and do surgery, its kind of difficult to see where (vessels and nerves) go. It is so helpful to see something in 3-D and rotate things around.

    Chicken vaccinations aiding health improvement in East Timor villagesA team of r...