Vet Practice July 2015

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  • PPRRAACCTTIICCEE

    JULY 2015 $6.95 GST INCL.

    Mustering science

    University of Sydney researcher Dr Elizabeth Arnott explains the Farm Dog Project and why it matters

    tothe economy, page 20

    Youre not aloneHow you can help managegrief, page 28

    Taking a back seatWhen sitting down is good for your health, page 24

    Offshore demandAustralian veterinarians are being sought after for Asian placements, page 12

    Annual reportOur guide

    to the best products at the

    2015 ASAVA conference,

    page 31

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    Dissolve struvite stones in as little as 7 days (average 28)3

    www.myhillsvet.com.au

    1. Lekcharoensuk C, Osborne CA, Lulich JP. Epidemiologic study of risk factors for lower urinary tract diseases in cats. JAVMA 2001; 218:1429-1435; 2. Kruger JM, Lulich JP, Merrills J, et al. A year-long prospective, randomized, double-masked study of nutrition on feline idiopathic cystitis. Proceedings. ACVIM Forum 2013; 3. Lulich JP, Kruger JM, MacLeay JM, et al. Struvite urolith dissolution in cats: A doublemasked randomized clinical trial of two foods. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013. TM Trademarks owned by Hills Pet Nutrition, Inc. 2015 Hills Pet Nutrition Pty Ltd. HIMA-HB-151A4C66. HPA2380. 03/15. GHG.

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  • JULY 2015

    Cover storyAway to me 20Dr Elizabeth Arnott explains the importance of the Farm Dog Project

    News + eventsPet ownership figures released 6The cost of caring for pets keeps rising; racehorses at risk from misuse of cobalt, and much more

    Your worldAsia: The land of opportunity? 12Offshore demand for Australian vets is increasing

    Your businessRed flags 16Businesses never go bad overnightthere are always warning signs

    Stand down 24Standing on your feet all day can lead to a range of nasty health complaints, but there is a lot you can do to ease the load

    Seeking counsel 28Dealing with clients grief is a regular part of being a vet, but knowing what support services are available can make a world of difference

    Your toolsNew products 10Latest and greatest gear for your practice

    Product guide 31Vet Practice magazines guide to the best products at the 2015 ASAVA conference

    Tools of the trade 43Reviewed by your peers

    Your lifePersonal best 46After achieving her lifelong dream of working at Australia Zoo, Dr Melanie Panayiotou soon found another passionas a world-class marathon runner

    Contents

    CONTENTS

    20

    24

    16 46

    PRACTICE Editorial Director Rob Johnson

    Sub-editor Kerryn Ramsey

    Editor Nicole Hogan

    Digital Director Ann Gordon

    Art Director Lucy Glover

    Contributors John Burfitt, Chris Sheedy, Natasha Phillimore, Angela Tufvesson, Blake Dennis

    Commercial Director Mark Brown

    For all editorial or advertising enquiries:Phone (02) 9660 6995 Fax (02) 9518 5600info@vetpracticemag.com.au

    Vet Practice magazine is published 11 times a year by Engage Media, Suite 4.17, 55 Miller Street, Pyrmont NSW 2009. ABN 50 115 977 421. Views expressed in Vet Practice magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or Engage Media. Printed by Webstar.

    28

    12

    Sales Director Adam Cosgrove

    4,557 - CAB Audited as at March 2015

    GUARANTEED*

    NEW

    * Feline Idiopathic Cystitis (FIC) is a major cause of FLUTD1

    Introducing the first clinically tested nutrition for FIC with ingredients to help control stressNutrition clinically tested to:

    Reduce the recurrence of FIC signs by 89%2

    Dissolve struvite stones in as little as 7 days (average 28)3

    www.myhillsvet.com.au

    1. Lekcharoensuk C, Osborne CA, Lulich JP. Epidemiologic study of risk factors for lower urinary tract diseases in cats. JAVMA 2001; 218:1429-1435; 2. Kruger JM, Lulich JP, Merrills J, et al. A year-long prospective, randomized, double-masked study of nutrition on feline idiopathic cystitis. Proceedings. ACVIM Forum 2013; 3. Lulich JP, Kruger JM, MacLeay JM, et al. Struvite urolith dissolution in cats: A doublemasked randomized clinical trial of two foods. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013. TM Trademarks owned by Hills Pet Nutrition, Inc. 2015 Hills Pet Nutrition Pty Ltd. HIMA-HB-151A4C66. HPA2380. 03/15. GHG.

    c/d Urinary Stress

    Ask your territory manager about

    NEW Hills Prescription Diet

    No. 1 Brand Recommended by Australian Vets

    Break the cycle with Hills c/d Multicare Urinary Stress

  • If there was ever any doubt about how much Australians love their four-legged friends, recent statistics from Roy Morgan Research should set it straight: a higher proportion of us live in households with a dog and/or cat than with a child. Thats right: 50 per cent of Aussies live in a household with at least one cat and/or dog in it, whereas 35 per cent share their household with at least one child aged under 16.

    Dogs are more popular than cats: 38 per cent of the population lives in a household with a canine companion, compared with 23 per cent who cohabit with a cat. Folks in households with at least one cat and one dog account for 12 per cent of the population.

    Tasmania is the State with the highest incidence of pet-ownership, with 44 per cent of its residents living with at least one dog, 34 per cent living with at least one cat, and 16 per cent living with at least one of each.

    NSW/ACT lags behind the rest of the country for cats (19 per cent), dogs (35 per cent) and both (nine per cent).

    Pet ownership figures released

    6

    news + events

    While 20 per cent Australian dog owners and 14 per cent of cat owners pay for pet-care services in an average four weeks, this can vary noticeably between States (particularly when it comes to dogs). For example, while 22 per cent of dog owners in Queensland pay for pet-care services in an average four weeks, only 16 per cent of Tasmanian dog owners do the same.

    Although NSW has the lowest rate of cat ownership in Australia, the residents who do own cats (16 per cent) are slightly more likely than those in other States (all 14 per cent) to shell out for pet-care services.

    But the cost of caring for our furry family members doesnt stop there. On top of pet-care services and food (of course), 11 per cent respectively of dog and cat owners buy pet supplies* in any given four weeks. The average amount spent in this period is $90 for dogs and $87 for cats, but this too appears to depend on state of residence.

    Paying an average of $118 for dogs and $131 for cats in an average four weeks, South Aussie pet owners pay the most for pet supplies. In contrast, Tasmanian pet owners pay an average

    of $70 for dogs and $56 for cats, the lowest in the country.

    Norman Morris, Roy Morgan Researchs industry communications director, says, Ownership of cats and dogs has remained relatively stable in Australia over the last five years, with dogs the perennial favourite. Although the affection and companionship they give us is priceless, our pets do come at a cost: not only is there food to buy, but other pet supplies, such as kitty litter, toys, food bowls, collars, leads and so on, as well as pet services such as veterinary treatment, dog walking, pet grooming and so on.

    Considering how high-maintenance dogs are compared with their more independent feline counterparts, it is not surprising to learn that dog owners are more likely than cat owners to pay for pet-care services in any given four-week period. In general, dog owners also pay more than cat owners for pet supplies.

    Pet-care service providers and pet supply brands need to understand not only how dog- and cat-owners differ, but how the market for their products varies around the country. *NB: Pet supplies do not include food.

    During its annual World Congress in Bangkok, Thailand, in May, the World Small Animal Veterinary

    Association (WSAVA) announced the winners of its

    prestigious awards, which recognise veterinary excellence and achievement around the world. They are:WSAVA International Award for Scientific Achievement Dr Michael R Lappin, Professor of Small Animal Clinical Veterinary Medicine at Colorado State University, USA. WSAVA Global One Health Award Dr Nalinika Obeyesekere, CEO of Blue Paw Trust, an organisation which

    contributes to human health and advances animal welfare in Sri Lanka.WSAVA Global Meritorious Service Award Nepalese veterinarian Dr Mukti Narayan Shresthathe first Nepalese vet to hold senior ranks in the Nepalese government.WSAVA Presidents AwardThis award was made posthumously to Professor Jan Gajentaan, who died last February. Professor Gajentaan championed the role of the companion animal veterinarian, founding first the Dutch Voorjaarsdagen (Spring) Congress before co-founding the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA).

    WSAVA Hills Excellence in Veterinary Healthcare Award This years recipient is Dr S. Sivagurunathan, whose commitment to driving up standards of veterinary care has contributed significantly to the increase in the quality of small-animal medicine in his home country of Malaysia. WSAVA Hills Next Generation Award The first recipient of the award is Dr Pantakarn Onnak (pictured left), from Chonburi, Thailand. WSAVA Henry Schein Cares International Veterinary Community Service Award: Dr Nantarika Chansue from Nonthaburi, Thailand.

    WSAVA 2015 award winners

    The cost of pet care

  • 8

    news + events

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    Wedge-tailed eagle Eva has found a new home with Australia Zoo, following treatment from a University of Queensland (UQ) vet.

    The eagle was rescued from a roadside and was thought to have survived an attempt to domesticate her by removing her talons and a toe.

    Specialist avian veterinarian Associate Professor Bob Doneley treated the juvenile bird at UQs Gatton Campus.

    He said Eva the eagle was rescued by a farmer and the Granite Belt Wildlife Carers group, and initially was treated at Stanthorpe Veterinary Care Services. It appears someone may have tried to domesticate Eva by cutting her talons to keep her from scratching or injuring when handled by humans.

    As a result, both her feet were swollen and painful and her left halluxthe big toe at the backhas been clipped so short that the last bone in the toe has been cut

    off and her right hock joint is mildly unstable, Dr Doneley said.

    Unable to use her right foot, Eva was standing mostly on her left foot, where she had developed pressure sores from the stress.

    Dr Doneley, one of only two bird medicine specialists in Queensland, consulted with Professor Patrick Redig of the University of Minnesota Raptor Center, a world leader in the treatment of this type of bird.

    Shes since been transferred to the Australian Wildlife Hospital at Australia Zoo. When her rehabilitation is complete, she will be able to be placed in a zoo and be used as an educational tool to teach people why wildlife cant be kept as pets.

    Staff at the centre are dealing with a rising number of injured wildlife cases.

    They are brought in after collisions with cars or attacks by cats, dogs or feral animals, Dr Doneley said.

    We also regularly see evidence of human attempts at domestication, despite the protection of these animals by legislation.

    These attempts often result in the serious injury or death of the animals.

    The University of Queensland Veterinary Medical Centre receives no government funding to treat injured wildlife, and relies on community donations and in-kind support.

    Donations can be made through: www.uq.edu.au/giving/donations/fund/School_of_Veterinary_Science.

    Eva set to soar again

    Racehorses at risk from misuse of cobalt, new study findsIn a new study published in The Veterinary Journal, scientists from the University of Surrey, UK, warn about the numerous risks posed to racehorses from the misuse of cobalt chloride, a banned performance-enhancing agent that has been used illegally by trainers in Australia and the USA.

    The team of researchers have uncovered that when excessive levels of the alleged performance-enhancing substance are administered to a horse, it can cause serious cardiovascular issues, potential nerve problems, thickening of the blood and thyroid toxicity. The researchers also pointed to the lack of evidence for enhanced performance in horses and human athletes.

    Cobalt, required by all horses in order

    to survive, is normally present at very low levels through various feedstuffs. However, excessive amounts of impure formulations of the substance, which can be administered easily as a powder, feed supplement or injection, can lead to severe side effects. This includes long-term damage to vital organs such as the heart.

    Indeed, in humans, cobalt salts have been used in the past to treat rare forms of anaemia. However, it has been associated with a variety of adverse effects, including gastrointestinal neurologic, cardiovascular, and thyroid problems. As a result, its use has been discontinued.

    We have grave concerns over a potentially lethal practice in

    the racehorsing industry, and are most concerned that some trainers continue to use Google as their source of information, said lead author Professor Ali Mobasheri from the University of Surrey.

    It is the duty of veterinary surgeons working in the industry to ensure that horse trainers are aware of the dangers of its amateur use.

    Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that cobalt chloride can enhance human or equine athletic performance. It is our hope that this study will increase greater awareness and prompt a broader discussion about the misuse of this substance. This post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Surrey.

    Eva

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