Vet Practice October 2015

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  • Dr Lisa Chimes is helping to reduce animals in shelters,

    one puppy at a time

    Clickbait The trend for online shopping

    is pervading the world of pets, but at what cost?

    Supply and demandWithout oversight, the

    prevalence of professional education is leading to a vet nurse oversupply

    Look smartTwo practices

    redefine the architectural

    wow factor

    queenScreen

    OCTOBER 2015 $6.95 GST INCL.

  • Every dog has its day.

    remember Nexgard on your chosenday of the month,every month tokill fleas and ticks.

    One NexGard chew, once a month, kills fleas and ticks.

    NexGard makes protecting your pet against fleas and ticks easier than ever before.

    Its the once-a-month treatment that combines state-of-the-art science with an active ingredient that works to protect against fleas and ticks, in a tasty chew that dogs love to eat.

    You can make your NexGard Day the first of the month, or any day you choose, every month.

    Its as simple as that.

    When science meets simplicity, NexGard is more than just a flea and tick product; its Next-Generation Protection.

    nexgard.com.auA SANOFI COMPANYSee product label for full claim details. Merial Australia Pty Ltd. 12-24 Talavera Rd, Macquarie Park NSW 2113. ABN 53 071 187 285.NEXGARD is a registered trademark of Merial. 2015 Merial limited. All rights reserved. NXGD.15.07.0182b

    kills fleas kills ticks one chew once a month

    tasty chew

    SMMRL 0120 297x210mm NXG [P] Vet Practice.indd 1 1/10/2015 12:28 pm

  • OCTOBER 2015

    Cover storySeeking shelter 18As televisions newest veterinarian face, Dr Lisa Chimes is educating Australians on rescue animals.

    News + eventsThe latest in the veterinary world 4Reducing the number of unwanted kittens, and more.

    Your worldSummer of love 10As the trend for cat cafes continues to grow, theyre helping to provide a home for unwanted animals.

    Your businessFears for the future 14With the number of veterinary training institutions continually on the rise, concerns are being raised about the quality of graduates and the number of jobs.

    Handled with care 24In todays crowded market, standing out has never been more important. These two practices demonstrate significant architectural innovation.

    Pet projects 28While shopping centre pet stores are under scrutiny, online retail is just another avenue in which animals can be traded unscrupulously.

    Your toolsNew products 9Assistance with practice stock control.

    Education guide 33Vet Practices guide to the best in training and professional development.

    Tools of the trade 41Reviewed by your peers in the profession.

    Your lifeThe big chill 46For Dr Geoff Wilson, combating some of the worlds most challenging locationsand raising money all the whileis a thrilling addiction.

    Contents

    CON TENTS

    10

    18

    28 46

    PRACTICE Editorial Director Rob Johnson

    Digital Director Ann Gordon

    Contributors Tracey Porter, Frank Leggett

    Commercial Director Mark Brown

    For all editorial or advertising enquiries:Phone (02) 9660 6995 Fax (02) 9518 5600info@vetpracticemag.com.au

    Vet Practice magazine is published 11 times a year by Engage Media, Suite 4.17, 55 Miller Street, Pyrmont NSW 2009. ABN 50 115 977 421. Views expressed in Vet Practice magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or Engage Media. Printed by Webstar.

    24

    14

    Sales Director Adam Cosgrove

    4,557 - CAB Audited as at March 2015

    Sub-editor Kerryn Ramsey

    Editor Mitchell Oakley Smith

    Art Director Lucy Glover

    Every dog has its day.

    remember Nexgard on your chosenday of the month,every month tokill fleas and ticks.

    One NexGard chew, once a month, kills fleas and ticks.

    NexGard makes protecting your pet against fleas and ticks easier than ever before.

    Its the once-a-month treatment that combines state-of-the-art science with an active ingredient that works to protect against fleas and ticks, in a tasty chew that dogs love to eat.

    You can make your NexGard Day the first of the month, or any day you choose, every month.

    Its as simple as that.

    When science meets simplicity, NexGard is more than just a flea and tick product; its Next-Generation Protection.

    nexgard.com.auA SANOFI COMPANYSee product label for full claim details. Merial Australia Pty Ltd. 12-24 Talavera Rd, Macquarie Park NSW 2113. ABN 53 071 187 285.NEXGARD is a registered trademark of Merial. 2015 Merial limited. All rights reserved. NXGD.15.07.0182b

    kills fleas kills ticks one chew once a month

    tasty chew

    SMMRL 0120 297x210mm NXG [P] Vet Practice.indd 1 1/10/2015 12:28 pm

  • 4

    news + events

    Reducing the number of unwanted kittensWhile spring brings warmer weather and longer days, it also marks the beginning of the most prolific cat breeding season of the year, with many kittens born without homes. While animal shelters do an outstanding job in protecting these unwanted kittens, the burden in Australia is a significant one, often leading to overcrowding and

    a strain on resources for these non-profit institutions.

    Breeding season varies depending on where you are in Australia, said Dr Robert Johnson, the president of the Australian Veterinary Association [AVA]. It typically begins around September when we start to see the first groups of pregnant cats and very young kittens arrive at vet clinics and shelters. By early October, the situation worsens with

    mums and kittens arriving in fatal numbers.

    While there are initiatives in place to address

    the high level of unwanted companion levelsincluding

    at the government legislative levelthere is more that can be

    done to help lessen the situation over the coming months.

    The AVA believes that the most effective way to make an impact on the problem involves

    a multi-pronged approach thats appropriate to the situation in each

    state or local government area, said Dr Johnson. This includes: Understanding the problem: Most unwanted cats and kittens

    ending up in shelters are stray or surrendered owned cats and kittens. Others may be feral or lost. The source of unwanted animals in each particular area needs to be identified and addressed.Education: Rather than feeding stray cats, its better to take ownership of them or take them to a shelter. Otherwise, they will continue to breed in large numbers, further contributing to the problem.Identification: Microchipping and collars with tags are vital to ensure that lost animals can be returned to their owners without having to go to a pound or shelter and further adding to overcrowded facilities.Desexing: That prevents pet cats having unwanted litters of kittens.Targeted desexing programs in areas where there is an unusually low number of desexed cats can be an effective strategy to reduce unwanted animals in particular communities.Enforcing regulation: Regulations for breeding, keeping and selling companion animals need to be enforced to reduce impulse buying, poor animal welfare and euthanasia rates.

    A new female labrador, Radar [pictured], recently joined Assistance Dogs Australias troop of specially trained dogs, helping to provide aid to people in need, with thanks to the support of The Advantage Family, which provided sponsorship to cover the cost of the dogs two-year training. During this period, Radar will learn how to provide specialised support to Australians in need by performing tasks including the opening and closing of doors, retrieving

    dropped items, removing items of clothing from washing machines and

    paying cashiers at stores. Richard Lord,

    the chief executive officer of Assistance

    Dogs Australia, said that the cost of training an assistance dog is close to $30,000, which includes its food, veterinary treatments, placement and follow-up care for the next eight to 10 years of the dogs working life. Whats more is that Assistance Dogs

    Australia currently operates without government funding, relying instead on the corporate sponsorship such as that by The Advantage Family.

    Established in 1996, the organisation places the trained canines in homes free of charge, and trains two types of dogs: those for service and those for support. The former is placed with adults with physical disabilities and young people with autism, and are trained to respond to up to 50 specialised commands. Support dogs, on the other hand, provide therapy support to special needs schools, aged-care facilities and childrens hospices.

    Its a girl

    With spring comes kitten breeding season.

  • Reducing the number of unwanted kittens

    Associate Professor Trish Fleming of Murdoch University, Perth, wrote in the online news service, ScienceNetwork WA, about the lack of attention and respect given to animals at the less attractive end of the spectrum. With the demise of numerous species in recent years, including the Christmas Island pipistrelle and some native rodents and bats, A/Prof Flemings concern was that on a government and community level we tend only to contributewhether financially, professionally or at a grassroots levelto the protection of large, charismatic animals at the expense of small (and, sometimes, ugly) ones.

    Most people would be surprised to learn that Australia is home to more than 70 native rodent species, and about the same number of bats, wrote A/Prof Fleming. Bats and native rodents make up almost half of our total number of mammal species, and yet for most species, science has done barely more than catalogue their existence.

    A/Prof Flemings observation is supported by the extinction of at least three native rodent species, described only from bone fragments in caves where owls roost.

    The losses are being caused by a number of factors, largely environmental. With 2010 the driest and warmest summer on record, vast expanses of forest were lost, including tuart trees, under the canopies of which the western false pipistrelle forages. When we lose forests, we also lose habitat for microbats, wrote A/Prof Fleming.

    We dont understand the full impact of this loss, but we know that small insectivorous bats can eat up to 1000 mosquitos in an hour4000 for nursing femalesand losing bats from our environment means less control over mosquito numbers.

    We could [soon] lose the animals that pollinate our plants, recycle nutrients into the soil, help plants become established, wrote A/Prof Fleming. We need to work together in order to work in complex systems. In the same way that isolated groups could not save the Christmas Island pipistrelle, we need communication, integration, and interaction to save other species.

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    Sharing the love

    Native bats are just one species with dwindling

    numbers.

  • Following a recent spread of parvovirus throughout the United States, an outbreak in Riverland, South Australia, has been deemed the worst in 15 years, reported ABC News. The outbreak, the result of owners failing to vaccinate their dogs against parvo, has lead to more cases in the past few months as in all of 2014.

    Parvovirus, which can be fatal, attacks the immune system of young puppies and is spread via faeces, and usually experiences a spike during the spring

    news + events

    An outbreak of parvovirus

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    According to a survey conducted by Dairy Australia in 2013, the average size of Australian dairy herds has risen 37 per cent over the past decade, a trend that looks set to continue with a third of the surveyed farmers expecting to calve more cows in the following year. The increased scale of production, the Australian Veterinary Association believes, could impact the individual welfare outcomes of the cows.

    Increasing scale of production means larger herd sizes, increased stocking densities, longer milking times, longer walking distances, and reduced ability to examine and treat cows individually, said Dr David Beggs of the Animal Welfare Science Centre of

    Assessing the welfare of cows in large dairy herds

    REVIEWERS WANTEDWe want you to write for Vet Practice!Every issue, were asking vets to review their toolstelling us in a couple of paragraphs what they love about them and what they dont like. Check out the reviews starting on page 41.

    Theres only two rulesyou have to be a practising vet, and it has to be something you use. The whole idea is to start a conversation between our readers. We dont want to tell you what to buy. We want your peers the people actually using the equipmentto guide you to whats good and what isnt.

    If youd like to write a review, email the Editor at info@engagemedia.com.au, and hell tell you whats involved.

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    the University of Melbourne. These factors have the potential to cause reduced welfare outcomes for dairy cows. But on the other hand, there are management aspects that often improve outcomes with economies of scale. Welfare can be difficult to measure and theres been little published regarding the welfare outcomes for cows in large Australian dairy herds.

    Larger enterprises are more likely to have modern rotary dairies that reduce milking time. They may also be more likely to have infrastructure to electronically identify, monitor and feed individual cows, they may be more likely to use professional advice and provide superior nutrition, and they may have greater capacity for staff training and quality assurance, Dr Beggs said.

    As part of a PhD looking at welfare outcomes in larger herds, he conducted a survey in 2014 to assess the relationships between herd size and known or proposed risk factors for adverse animal welfare outcomes in Australian dairy herds. We received responses from 863 [13 per cent] Australian dairy farms representing 260,000 cows with an average herd size of 304 and what we found was that a larger herd size was associated with risk factors for animal welfare concerns in relation to decreased staffing per cow, increased grain feeding [which can lead to diseases] and milking time.

    There was no evidence, however, of an increase in disease, cow contentment levels or other adverse welfare outcomes. More than 95 per cent of farmers believed that their cows were content most of the time. This can probably be explained by larger enterprises having access to better training and education of staff, routine veterinary herd visits, separate milking of the main herd and the sick cows, transition diets before calving and written protocols for treatment of disease.

    season. Symptoms include sudden vomitin...