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  • The WorldJOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL VOLUME LXXXVIII ISSUE 5 THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2016

    Letter from the SBP So what does the average Burroughs student have to look forward to?

    (page 3)

    Cyber Security??Although this event is now over, it shines a spotlight on the growing issue of cyberse-curity within the Burroughs community.

    (page 4)

    Just Jessin AroundAs Burroughs students, there is huge potential for us to leave this institution with a skewed understanding of how the world works.

    (page 8)

    Joining the CowboysFourth overall pick in the first round of the 2016 NFL draft

    (page 10)

    Farewell to Our SeniorsJESSICA GOLDBERGCopy Editor

    As their May Projects wind down and the

    pruning and primping of Graduation Grove is well underway, our seniors reflect on

    their precious years at JBS and their pre-paredness and excitement for what col-lege life will bring. Years of grueling high school classes, sports practices, and other extracurriculars culminated in a hectic, first-semester senior experience marked by

    late night studying and tumblers of coffee

    practically superglued to their hands. In the end, it all paid off with big gains. Their well-crafted and brightly polished college applications, essays, resumes, and portfo-lios yielded JBS seniors Wonkas magical golden ticket into their colleges of choice. Many seniors communicated that an es-sential ingredient to their college success was finding the right fit and being able to

    roll with the punches, given the heightened uncertainty of college admissions today. Sydney Tischler observed, I am absolutely thrilled with my decision to go to Welles-ley, and I consider my college admissions process a successful one because, while I will be the first to tell you that I was not

    accepted into every school I applied to, I

    truly believe I was accepted into the col-lege that is right for me. Mya Harris, elat-ed to be headed to Washington University in the fall, shared that her success was due to a combination of being really realistic about what I could do given my grades and extracurriculars, and being as genuine as possible when writing essays. Departing

    for Princeton University in August, Olivia Long recommended that students try not

    to get too attached to one specific college.

    You may be disappointed because of the

    many factors that are outside of your con-trol. A substantial number of seniors de-scribed a successful college admissions experience marked by taking advantage of the early decision or early action process available at many colleges and universi-ties. I knew that Grinnell was my number one choice, and I had three quality backups that I would be satisfied with if Grinnell

    didnt work out. Luckily, I was accepted

    Early Decision in the winter, and saved

    myself a lot of stress, opined Maddy Smith. Excited about attending George-town Universitys Walsh School of Foreign Service, Erin Byrne similarly conveyed that early admission made everything a

    lot less stressful. So too did Jason Chen, headed to Columbia University, articulate that I got into my early decision school . . . so I was done with the college process really early, which wzzas nice. While virtually all seniors expressed a sentiment that their college journey ulti-mately yielded great success and exciting college choices, many articulated feelings of angst and stress about the rigors and frustrations of the application process it-self. The college admissions process was actually as bad as everyone says. I had 18

    different essays to write for applications to 9 schools, said Jeremy Pinson, who will

    be joining the campus of George Wash-ington University. It was very stressful at the end when I still had three apps due in three hours and I only had started an es-say outline for one of them, echoed Adam Martin, who will be attending Brigham Young University after completing a two-year mission for his church. Heading to the University of Missouri Honors College & School of Journalism, Lucy Reis added, I

    tend to procrastinate; so for me, the col-lege process was filled with many late and

    stressful nights. Continued on Page 8MACON

    Seniors wave goodbye to Burroughs. NEWMAN

    NEWMAN

  • The WorldJOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL VOLUME LXXXVIII ISSUE 5 THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2016

    Letter from the SBP So what does the average Burroughs student have to look forward to?

    (page 3)

    Cyber Security??Although this event is now over, it shines a spotlight on the growing issue of cyberse-curity within the Burroughs community.

    (page 4)

    Just Jessin AroundAs Burroughs students, there is huge potential for us to leave this institution with a skewed understanding of how the world works.

    (page 8)

    Joining the CowboysFourth overall pick in the first round of the 2016 NFL draft

    (page 10)

    Farewell to Our SeniorsJESSICA GOLDBERGCopy Editor

    As their May Projects wind down and the

    pruning and primping of Graduation Grove is well underway, our seniors reflect on

    their precious years at JBS and their pre-paredness and excitement for what col-lege life will bring. Years of grueling high school classes, sports practices, and other extracurriculars culminated in a hectic, first-semester senior experience marked by

    late night studying and tumblers of coffee

    practically superglued to their hands. In the end, it all paid off with big gains. Their well-crafted and brightly polished college applications, essays, resumes, and portfo-lios yielded JBS seniors Wonkas magical golden ticket into their colleges of choice. Many seniors communicated that an es-sential ingredient to their college success was finding the right fit and being able to

    roll with the punches, given the heightened uncertainty of college admissions today. Sydney Tischler observed, I am absolutely thrilled with my decision to go to Welles-ley, and I consider my college admissions process a successful one because, while I will be the first to tell you that I was not

    accepted into every school I applied to, I

    truly believe I was accepted into the col-lege that is right for me. Mya Harris, elat-ed to be headed to Washington University in the fall, shared that her success was due to a combination of being really realistic about what I could do given my grades and extracurriculars, and being as genuine as possible when writing essays. Departing

    for Princeton University in August, Olivia Long recommended that students try not

    to get too attached to one specific college.

    You may be disappointed because of the

    many factors that are outside of your con-trol. A substantial number of seniors de-scribed a successful college admissions experience marked by taking advantage of the early decision or early action process available at many colleges and universi-ties. I knew that Grinnell was my number one choice, and I had three quality backups that I would be satisfied with if Grinnell

    didnt work out. Luckily, I was accepted

    Early Decision in the winter, and saved

    myself a lot of stress, opined Maddy Smith. Excited about attending George-town Universitys Walsh School of Foreign Service, Erin Byrne similarly conveyed that early admission made everything a

    lot less stressful. So too did Jason Chen, headed to Columbia University, articulate that I got into my early decision school . . . so I was done with the college process really early, which wzzas nice. While virtually all seniors expressed a sentiment that their college journey ulti-mately yielded great success and exciting college choices, many articulated feelings of angst and stress about the rigors and frustrations of the application process it-self. The college admissions process was actually as bad as everyone says. I had 18

    different essays to write for applications to 9 schools, said Jeremy Pinson, who will

    be joining the campus of George Wash-ington University. It was very stressful at the end when I still had three apps due in three hours and I only had started an es-say outline for one of them, echoed Adam Martin, who will be attending Brigham Young University after completing a two-year mission for his church. Heading to the University of Missouri Honors College & School of Journalism, Lucy Reis added, I

    tend to procrastinate; so for me, the col-lege process was filled with many late and

    stressful nights. Continued on Page 8MACON

    Seniors wave goodbye to Burroughs. NEWMAN

    NEWMAN

  • Student government at John Burroughs is almost as old an

    institution as the school itself. Just weeks after the doors of JBS were opened in Oc-tober 1923, the first schoolwide elections were held: for a group of delegates, tasked with creating a Constitution to lead stu-dent government. By the next school year, a document had been assembled, dividing power between three branches of govern-ment, modeled after the U.S. Constitution. The School Assembly, made up of the entire student body, was created to mimic the Legislative Branch. As an Executive Branch, the Student Council was estab-lished, made up of four members, as well as a Secretary and a Treasurer. Finally, Burroughs answer to the Judicial Branch the only survivor of the original Consti-tution was Student Court. To lead each branch, a Speaker of the Assembly was elected, as well as a Council President and Chief Justice, with the latter posts both being filled by the same

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