8
L* vV "i *>^w-<*El*^l^.iHfr^ ' • ' •'>" f :.-.. ..^.- . . . . !, ' OUR MOTTO IS "ALL THE N m THAT'I PIT TO PRINT" V*L47 mmmmmmmm Pmckney, CMS County, Michigan Wednesday, February 10, 1932 Bispntdj OUR SUBSCRIPTION RATE IS $1.25 PER YEAR No. 6 »*» - L d d Basket | Fartier and Son j M l Results! Banquet Held; Q[ Important Decisions ] D (Oil Drillers Strike Hljfc School Teams Trims Yp.i 37 to ) 18. IndependeftU Win from Munith j •-< ^ ^ * M « . 4 1 , Gcod AttencUnce It Present at the Annual Father and Son Ban- quet Last Wednesday Evening. w.. The Pinckncy Independent basket ball team defeated Munith team in a free scoring game Saturday night by a score of 64 to 41. Pinckncy used a passing game mostly while MMnL^..S?l..fL.!P.ai®rity. of their points by long shots. Lefty Reason had a gala night and topped all scorers with 25 points, Swarthout got 21, Har Hall 10, and Read and Shehan 4 each. Nichol led the visitors in scor- ing with 10 points. Pinckney L. F. R. F. C R. F. L. F. _L3hehan Reason Swarthout Carr Hall Road —8ulMiluliun -##*• Munith Nichol Palmer Dixon Kinch Smith Road. PA •••V Ficld Goals Reason 12, Swarthout 10, Hall 5, Read 2, Shehan 2, Nichol 8, Patmerr, Dtxorr^,Smith-fc-Fotrt- goals Reason 1, Swarthout 1, Palm- rr 1, Smith 2. Fouls—Pinckney 5, Munich 10. Referee Bovard. Urn- pi ? Gery cz ' Pinckncy high school basket ball tii.-vi had little difficulty defeating the Ypsilanti Central high school re- serve team here Friday night by a score of 37 to 18. They led at the end-o#-the first quarter 12 to 2 and WH<? never in danger of defeat- The second team played about half of the game and scored nine of Pinckney's points. Dinkel made 16 points and Meabon 8. Kline was Ypsilanti's best scorer with 7.The Ypsilanti team fail- •kilt to A good attendance turned out to the amrual Father and Son Banquet held in the parlors of the Congrega- tional church last Wednesday even- ing. However, it was not as large as thar present at the.--.ouo. tald two. years ago by the Parent-Teachers Assoc The banquet was served about 7:00 to which all did ample justice. Following this a program was put on in th.' church auditorium with Ross Read as mast' r of ceremonies. A se- lection by tiie Iseler orchestra start- ed off the overlings events. Then Rev. E. J. Derquist delivered the Welcome to th? Sons. The Boys Choir, consist- ing of ten boys whose average age was pbout twelve years then sun " two selections. Calvin 'Hooker wa next, his topic being "The Welcome to the Fathers." The Father's Quar- tette was to have appeared on the program but on account of illness of two of them they were unable to sing. Lester HufT of Pingree sang a solo Tina responded to an encore. The Son's Quartette was next but it turn- ed on' to be a trio as they were also one *>.y. ' Nevertheless they did the best they could considering 5 the fact that Don Swarthout was obliged to sing >oth bass and tenor. America w-H* thensung-by-the entire assembly who H mair.ed standing while ring- in;:. McPhorson Smith of the .county boy .••rout council made several an- rounr- merits and Dr. Noble of the Howell Presbyterian church deliver- ed the add re as. He took for hia topic- Oil at 527 Ft. A Small Oil Pocket it Struck on Smith Farm Near South Lyon Reports Attack By Bandit The Weekly Church Program Drillers of the Smith Petroleum Co. of Chester, West Virginia who are seeking oil on the farm of Sup- ervisor W. K. Smith about a mile and a half south of New Hudson, and who h;st week obtained encouraging sampU's of erude oil from the 527 foot hoh»_tiiex_.JiauL_siink^_ai , e._going deeper into the. earth hoping to find in the Dundee sand oil in sufhVient quantity to bring in a Mowing well. There seemed to be no limit to the oil found at the 527 foot depth and it tested out well. O. A. Smith, in lehaige of the drilling, said the oil pocket at this depth probably is not of f-uffiqient quantity to be of any partvular value 1 . He stated however that it was most encouraging. —-—iii^bc-licvcs if there is much oil it will be found in the Dundee sand, buF j CrreiiiCMMt > We believe it was Bill Shakespeare I who once remarked "Sweet are the \ Use* cf Adversity. The current state ths ! of ^ <>}1 eS4U ' on seems to have produc- I ed a few good results if it has caused {much discomfort. According to the i report. filed by- tha different prose- cuting attorneys there has been a i\ Former Gregory Man Attached and I Beaten by Bandit CATHOLIC CHURCH SERVICE Sunday Divine Sevice at S:30 and that they will havi 10:30 A. M. each Saturdav morn- Cathechism at 8:30. L. R. ^ed to show any speak of. Pinckncy Read Paselk Meabon Dink -A Kennedy Miller for Smith, Hall Battle for Paselk, Basydlo for I Lester Huff responded with two more F. F. C . G. , G. Ypsilanti Res. Duffy Jackson Kline Crane Ferrh "Abraham Lincoln" and told of the many l^s^ojLs_which_ c o u j d b e learned from bis life. He denjvTl the statement that. Lincoln was an infidel or a man ; of no religious belief although he ad- niitt "i that he was not a member of any church. Dr. Noble's talk vJas well i n i g Confessions for| TTurrTyTTCenne^y;"Gerald- Clttrttm K—^fc. p '.° 1^1 given,.-.ml ihonld -famish, foott fnr 1 for Miller,. mur .h serious reflection and thought. Claiming to have been beat r, n ami : left lying in the street when he told a young man who had offered him a ! ride" ;md then demanded ht"> Hioney that he had no money , John McClear 63, 735 Christy avenue, appeared at police 1 JieadQiiarters early Saturday night and asked officers to make a .search for his assailant. r Cuts and bruises on McCIear's fa.ee testified to his having been struck, detectives state, but they wore unable to finn L idffiTiyf~~a--sirugglc near the corner of Fir>t and Morreil streets where McClear .claims, he was attack- ed, they reported. According to McClear'? story to police, he was walking home from town and at the corner of West Mich- j igan i:\cnue and Blackstone street aj -young WtW-ffi'lrfar asked him-if ••• 1 :30. Saturday evening at Rev. Lewis M Dion Pastor BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. P. F. Ksic.__Pa.-tor Services each Sunday Morning Worship ^..^.. Special arid separate seryic little folks. Sunday School Class for all [J. V. P. I." Kvening Worship I hurs. evening prayer scrvi.- i°J. 30 for tht . 11:45 7 :00 ... 8:00 —R7W a better idea of what they have there in another couple of weeks. At the present time no one can tell just what will be found iind where they will find wh&t may be there. ^ The Smith Company began drilling on the Smith farm about a couple of months ago. Day and night shifts are employed at this time. Frop;rt'ss now is rather slow as they are drilling j through rock.__South Lyon Herald. marked decrease in crime in the past two years. Crime showed a decrease in 11)30 and a still greater one in IW1. This serves to indicate that the crim^ wave which had its incept- ion immediately following the world W7Ti^7Trut>i?l(ting. " According to the report filed by I> iv James Vaughn, health officer for the city of Detroit, that tin city at the present time is en- joying the lowest death rate of its existance. Deaths in Detroit last year numbered 13,40:] which gives a rate of S.s per 1,000. In 1930 it was 9.3 and in 1!)2!» it was 13.4. Of those who died last year heart disease claimed 2,1!'5, cancer 1,113, tuberculosis 1,- iim-umonia 1,04(1, violence 1,- JJi_l 010, -.poplexy, nephritis, suicide, and appendicitis followed in the order named Dr. Vaughn lays this decreased death iate to the fact that on account of hu l< of money people arc living more normal lives, the climate has been good and there have been no epidemic.;. Also people are more care- ful of their diet and preventive mrasLip'.v are successfully combating' contagt-ous diseases. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH— E. J. Berquist, Minister Miss Elly Iscler, Organist Mrs. E, Baughn, Directress of Music Percy Swarthout, Supt. of S.S. Mevnin;: Worship .. 10:30 a. m Juvoi'* Church . .. . I 0 :30 a. m- SPANISH WAR VETERANS ADOPT RESOLUTION Livingston County Spanish War veterans at a recent meeting adopted the following resolution in regard to. the T.M- Mastern disturbance: Howell, Michigan " FTbnifiTy- 3, TTT32 l.iviii^to'i ''amp No. C>2. Mich. L. S. W. V. At legular meeting hel< John Werrderh BirdrproKcctrtfng at- torney of Ingham county has been calling around in this county the past week. He announces that ho is in the race for the nomination for congress- man in tin- Sixth District to stay. Mr. Pird's chief claim to fa7rre--4fc-ihc_ fact that it was his probe of the act- ivities of the Federal Bond and Mort- gage do. last summer that stirred Waynt county, state and federal of- ficials into action. ;i'd solos 'and" the ~TsIev orcheslra witlrp- evnnivp: program. u. 'or c Sundav Schoo V February adopted following 1'esolu- U»tfing t h a t -ih«> ITnit.pd Stntrx Ml >•> ftrr-Bayydlo; Ypsi, Baker for John. j-^rrrotl^T^^eTtnw-^vhii-.-h mncluded the] 1 ^;H--rtTrrt'^rhT^t^tli son. Field gpals Dinkel 8, Meabon 4, Smith 3, Battle L Read 1, Basydlo 1, Duffy 1, Kline 3, Ferris 3. "Foul goals— Rasydlo 1, Jackson 1, Kline 1. Fouh< Pinckney 4, Ypsi 5. Referee Hooker. went 'd a ride. McClear accepted ami, according tn his report to officers, he j rhr i sti;;11 Endeavor wa's^t-fi-k-un down F-ir^t street to- Jvlar-+-j^; r q MH; Lg dn'v 1 i :30 a. .i! 0:30 p. m -7^30-pr-m-- er stoppe 'J' STOCKBRIDGE PLAYS HERE THURSDAY The Pinckncy Independents will meet the Stockbridge team in a double header at the Pinckney Com- munity hnll on Thursday evening, February 11. The" filSt-gpmie^wnUtjm at 7:30 and the second atiT:00. Pinckncy played this team twice last year J nd was fortunate enough to win the last game by two points. NOTICE I n; ve purchased of Daisy As(]uith, Stockbridge, a permanent waving machine and facial chair. I am pre- pared to give all kinds of facials and a special for one week only of a .$4.00; Duradem, LcMur or Sheitan permanent waves complete with ring- let ends for $2.50. Dorothv Carr driver! ,fn wi'hTedi .-^" ; e BABY CHICKS^ after turning ofT First street. L According to McClear, the then got out" of the car, around to McClearV .-ide an* manded his money. .McClear .-UUed he had no money and the fight which ended with" McClear being left un- conscious in .the stn et start'd.. Jackson Citizen Press. John McClear formerly li Gregory where he worked a.-> tractor and constructed many es and barns in this section. "WoTstrip - TT7~: —( : 'hoir Kehcmv.aU— — Wednesilav evening i p. lor . . * : i •> "TcTr "".""' ~ . 7~:45 liaye- meeting, Thurs. . 7:30 p. in. Orc'e-tra nrac^ise. Thurs. 7:30 merit avoid by all honorable in its power, any participation ejfi i; •)(•<• in the Far Kastern > th.e.t e .()•>' honorable means power of th( j I'nited States Th" recent doings over in China seem lo have stirred up some of the~ old war spirit which flamed here in liMS. Notwithstanding the horrors of "wal• TTFT,:-t-he^'^-Avould -be many--wtWng— -LLoL-iaiLuL-faj oveiicnn dtrty-in Chin.-i. Howrvm 1 . thrre seems to be little j vu -I d in ious- CARIXX>E^tHANlC r We sincerely wish to thanTT OTe" King's Daughters for their kindness in remembering us with the beautiful box of candy and fruit during our recent illness. Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Rrigham POSTMASTERS NAMED President Hoover has named Frank G. Leeson postmaster of Manchester for another term and . William C. Miller postmaster at Pinckney. The nominations were sent to the U. S. senate Monday. Purebred White Leghorns, White and Barred Rocks, Wyandotte Reds and Ophingtons, !>.00 to $11.00 per hundred. _._„____. Custom Hatching .S3.00 per hund- red. All Brooders 10 per cent oiT. . — ---,-- .., CREGOR BAPTLST CHURCH L. S. Slaybaugh Pastor 'i'i • church i> invited to atteml Tabn uele M-rvice in Jackson the ing of I'ebruary 1 'ith. Sunday was every member c;i; dav. Hi- e\- \e>,- wa\ the' Hill' etll ( Oakland Hills Poultry Farm, Farmington, Mich. > r is- : rr ts.-.; O. E. S. CARD PARTY Th•- Q. F>. S, are sponsoring a Washington party at theiij, hall in Pinckney Thursday evening, Feb. 18. Card* from S :30 to 11 followed by refreshments and dancing, each. WILLIAM GREGORY William Gregory, 4". son >-:' fh late William and Susan Strait!) Gre- gory of Dexter township, died at hi,- home in Ann Arbor Wednesday m>rn --mg--a-f-tc~r~a—?»h«4^jlln<'ss. The (|,c<as- ed was bom in Washtenaw county in what was known as Hudson. Mills j but had lived in Ann Arbor for the past '24 years where he was a nvmb er of the Fisher Hardware firm. In. 1!»0"J lie was married to Clara iiell of Dexter township who with one. son i«nd one daughter survives him. ;.Uee<lanee to .both church and W Sunday school Sunday. Goal for next Sunday in the Sun day .-( hoe I i II on yen. Following are -Mi>n G'ovV tin i territiiy by its nationals, and that; Ami :i an armed forces -, now stationed of on their a be stationed at the scene of dispute in the Far Ivast, to be re- ' as rapidly a- er-v lie consist- v ith the ) - e m < ) \ ;> i iiiace of safely. Al •:> Mint the (Juvei iiiinnt i>l thi 4 'mtn-' KUi4t,LS^J22ake no elfort to pro t e d :»r ) - emove fro Til th 1 itel'V jH'opertv owned j likelyhoyd of their- letting their wish, anyway. The Corps closed ment i^-usrd- to providr for- not " t nil ,- prr , rnt timr lnfywR y rTrilt iie<iiate r-vacuation ol disputed \ Unjt«• 11 States Maidne I its eii'.i.stment oflice in Detroit last md naval sunit]M , as th( , ir (1U0ta was CQm _ pletely . full and the navy office at Detroit announced last week that of i 112 application- received in January | only'.'.'•',would be accepted. Armv en- I- Americans j H s t m ,. n t > ;jn . . ( , s o a t a , (>w ( , bb / Thfs i last hranch of the sendee lacks the romantic appeal of the first two as it do< - not have the travel advantage' bv indi\-idual ; disputed ter- or controlled or enrporat ions, at the Offej'i i| bv them. "O* tlOSe TT Bill 20c ^^ is also sundved bv two brothers. SPECIAL COMMUNICATION Special communication of Living- ston Lodge No. Id F. & A. Among those from Pinckney who attended the funeral of Mrs. Rene Menard at Northfield Monday were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Eulcr and fam- ily, Henry Kice and wife, Mesdames Mike Lavey a«d Will Lcdwidge, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Doyle and son, Jun- ior, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baughn, Louis Coyle and wife. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ovitt of Gre- gory, F^d Merrill and wife of Fow- lerville- were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Bland. Mr. and Mrs.' O. L. Campbell and \ daughter, Leona, spent the week end ~* with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Campbell in Ann Arbor j Mrs. Alma Harris returned to De- ' trolt Sunday after spending the past week with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Snehan.' Mier l^imarljrrQ^Lynrh and Gene 1 Chandler of Kalamazoo »pent the ^et¥^iftt^wrth-Mm-M3Ty^^ \ Mr. and Mr*. Rex Smith visited Mm Cynihtsr -WtHmiw in Marion —Sunday. J Fred Teeple and wife,j>f Jettcy*-' vHIe were Sunday visitors at th«» home pt Mr. and Mrs. N. O. Frye. ' M. on T3T M issimiT, VM i>. I'eai Heed, Sarah*Lamborn, Agnes Arnold. Joseupiuw* JJowIott, Christine Howlett. Susie Placeway, Hetta Marshall, Bessie Marsliiill, Lotttt-• F.rearhy, Ruth Whitehead, Katlieiine Meyei-.-. Mrs. {hartley, Lauva Whiteheafi, and Mrs. Kockwell, liose Buhl and Mrs. Baker. ire counting | lllljni;)t ,. ,^,,,,,,^. ,,f r n ite,| States) : ('iti'/.'• i' -• or at peril of tin ii" live... Also that, we uri'-e ail vitiyeiiA-atul who are t:lkinfT ivT, Gertrud' James of Webster and Arthur of Flint and a sister, Mrs. Harry Mar shall of.Dexter. Funeral services were hold at St Andrews church Friday at 2:00 p. m .1 Saturday evening, February Work in the thTrd d egree. A good at- j Run il was in Forrest tendance is desired on this occasion ^jy ]1( Dexter whew and it is especially necessary that all members of the Fellowcraft team be present. Rf^reshments will be .-.erved following initiation. P. W. Curlett, Sec'y. I TAX NOTICE i 1 will be at the Pinckney Stat I Lank to r e i v e taxes every Saturda; until 'urther notice. othir i'nited Spanish War Veterans Camp- to request their representativ- '•• in Congress and in tin- Senate to follow the policy set forth in this re- solution. Also that this resolution !>•• sent to ail our Congressmen and representa- tives and to our State mid National Commanders with the request that it be transmitted to ail I'nited Spanish War Veteran Camps in 'he state and thro'.u.h their Commanders to other Commander's outside Michigan. Comrade Burt C. Daller, AdjL FALLS FROM L»GHT POLE While working at the Mich. StaV Sauaianum near Howell Saturday, Arlhut PeiryTHJ to the^groutid from an ! •> foot light p(de when his safety belt b< came unfastened. Ho was tak- '" to the MeJ'her.son Hospital at Howell whejv he will Ix confined for some weeks. MJV IVj'ry was engaged in installing the new laundry sendee at the sanatorium. Rev. Lewis of Ann Arbor officiating. Lawn ceme- the Masonic burial sen-ice WHS given by Golden Rule Lodge of Ann Arbor of which the deceased was a meinb"i\ "X Max Ledwidge Putnam Township Tre;u —O" CARD OF THANK We wish to express our thanks and appreciation to all who so kindly as- sisted in any way in this our time of sorrow. To Rev. H. V. Clark for -hi; iUe--age of xmnlorL To Hugh O" FOLLOWING A DOLLAR BILL In order to get a line on the life and adventures of a dollar bill the Waukegan, 111., Chamber of Com- merce started out a new bill with a. circular attached, requesting every person handling the bill to make a notation of its use. Here is the his- tory for fourteen daya. changing hands for service: Five times for salary. Five times for tobacco. Five times for cigarettes. Three times for camtyr" j THE KINC'S DAUGHTERS MEET! Despite the inclement weatlvrl there was an excellent attendance at the regular meeting of the King's Daughters, held at the home of Mrs. Fred Read, Thursday afternoon. Th-; devotlonirf and business follow- ed 'the luncheon'and an interesting MRS. MARY MURPHY Mrs. Mary Murphy, widow of the late William Murphy dicTl at the home of lvr daughter, Mrs. Martha St 'in in Detroit Sunday, February 7. The remains were brought to MRS. LUCILE MENARD Mrs. Lucile Merrard, ,24, wife Rene Menard, died at the Keren ing Hospital in Detroit last Friday aft-rj a long illne>s. The deceased was th-i olrje.i surviving daughter of Mr. and I Mrs Joseph Stackable of Hamburg j town-hip and was born in Northfield ( town-hip, Washtenaw county on th J Milmr for his thoughtfulnc.o and to j. the many friends for the beautiful floral offerings. i Mrs. S. (',, Topping Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Briggs K. L. Topp ng and family. O the home "of Patrick Kennedy in this ( n t h d».y of August, 1!»07. She was a village and the funeral was held from ' mrm h, T - 0 f the graduating class of St. Mary's church, Wednesday, al 10:30 p. M. Rev. Lewis Dion officiat- ing. Burial was in St. Mary's ceme- Th. but c .letter from the state president was * (,r y read also a letter of thanks from Mrs. Dorothy Ketchum of the U. of M. Hospital, for the garments nnd toys srmt the needy path nts during the yulotido. Mrs. T». C. Daller directed the fol- Twu-eTorinch's Turhishings. Twice fov shaves. Once for automobile ncccnwricrv Once for bacon. Once tor wanning powder. Once for garters. Once (or tooth pa«tc, deceased was born in Ireland ine to t.hw country in lKW. She was married to William Murphy in IS70. Sun-iving are four daught-J home. ers, Mis. Jack Pruess and Mrs, Wil- son St< in of Detroit and Mrs. Joe lowing program: piano ~soln. Miss. Morrisey and Mrs. David Bruce of Planchi' Mart in; r< adi ng. M rs^ ^ r m4^ a< ^^n^~Also^-4v^^ons-, Michael and I ial wa> \p th^ Northfield «emetery T VILLAGE CAUCUS Notice is Hereby Given Thar a Citizen's Village Caucus will I b,. held at Village Fim Hall. ! On Tuesday, Feb. '23, 1932 At 2 o'clock P. M. For the purpose of placing in nom- ination candidates for Village Office* the ensuing ^rm and for the 1'inckney high school in 102."). Surviv- ing are her husband and two children Patriria and Rene jr., her parents, Mr. Mid Mrs. Joseph Stackable. one sister, Leola, and six brothers, Jost-ph '»"" of Howell. Lawrence of Lansing and [, 4 - - * , tran.sactwjr of such other business as may prop^nly come before it. LouU, Henry, John an<J Aloysious at Tlv funeral \vas_ held from St. Patrick's church at Northfield Mon- <lay, RevTFVrThotrias offu-iating^-Buiv Ry o r d e r ^ Com. Signed Nellie Gardner Clerk of Village of Pinckney, Maycroft; vocal solos, Miss Dorothy Wilson. The next meeting will be held at the home of the Misses Hoff, with 'Mrs. Louis Clinton and Mrs. Reginald J land Schafer as entertainment committee. I lo*t>. Andrew of Jackson, Patrick of Leslie, William of Munith and John <^f-^Sw»- field. A brother, Michael who lives in Hudson and one, Patrick, of Ire- ire also left to mourn their -HOME BAKED COOPS t Michigan. n—- "NOTICE -*— /f Home made bread and frted enkea Old time Dance at the Portage on sale at Rill's place every day. Bak- Lake Falivion, Red Hen, Friday, Feb. ing done by order. Will also deliver. 12. Music by Kastlakr. Gent* ftty , Phone 44 Beth Kennedy! ladies 25c. ' ' % $ A. /'•>V5 &•:._ >t #"' '.WlR

vVi Bispntdj - pinckneylocalhistory.orgpinckneylocalhistory.org/Dispatch/1932-02-10.pdf · V*L47 mmmmmmmm Pmckney, CM S County, Michigan Wednesday, February 10, 1932 ... i report

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L*v V"i

* > ^ w - < * E l * ^ l ^ . i H f r ^ ' • ' •'>" f • : . - . . . . ^ . - . . . .!, '

OUR MOTTO I S " A L L T H E

N m T H A T ' I P I T T O P R I N T "

V*L47 mmmmmmmm

Pmckney, CMS County, Michigan Wednesday, February 10, 1932

Bispntdj OUR SUBSCRIPTION RATE IS $1.25 PER YEAR

No. 6 »*» - —

Ldd Basket |Fartier and Son j M l Results! Banquet Held;

Q[ Important Decisions ] D (Oil Drillers Strike

Hljfc School Teams Trims Yp.i 37 to ) 18. IndependeftU Win from Munith j

•-< ^ ^ * M « . 4 1 ,

Gcod AttencUnce It Present at the Annual Father and Son Ban­

quet Last Wednesday Evening.

w.. The Pinckncy Independent basket ball team defeated Munith team in a free scoring game Saturday night by a score of 64 to 41. Pinckncy used a passing game mostly while MMnL^..S?l..fL.!P.ai®rity. of their points by long shots. Lefty Reason had a gala night and topped all scorers with 25 points, Swarthout got 21 , Har Hall 10, and Read and Shehan 4 each. Nichol led the visitors in scor­ing with 10 points.

Pinckney L. F . R. F.

C R. F. L. F.

_L3hehan

Reason Swarthout Carr Hall Road

—8u lMi lu l i un - # # * •

Munith Nichol

Palmer Dixon Kinch Smith

Road.

PA

• • • V

Ficld Goals Reason 12, Swarthout 10, Hall 5, Read 2, Shehan 2, Nichol 8, P a t m e r r , Dtxorr^,Smith-fc-Fotr t-goals Reason 1, Swarthout 1, Palm-r r 1, Smith 2. Fouls—Pinckney 5, Munich 10. Referee Bovard. Urn-pi ? Gery c z '

Pinckncy high school basket ball tii.-vi had little difficulty defeating the Ypsilanti Central high school re­serve team here Friday night by a score of 37 to 18. They led at the end-o#-the first quar ter 12 to 2 and WH<? never in danger of defeat- The second team played about half of the game and scored nine of Pinckney's points. Dinkel made 16 points and Meabon 8. Kline was Ypsilanti's best scorer with 7.The Ypsilanti team fail-

•kilt to

A good attendance turned out to the amrual Father and Son Banquet held in the parlors of the Congrega­tional church last Wednesday even­ing. However, it was not as large as t h a r present at the.--.ouo. tald two. years ago by the Parent-Teachers Assoc The banquet was served about 7:00 to which all did ample justice. Following this a program was put on in th.' church auditorium with Ross Read as mast' r of ceremonies. A se­lection by tiie Iseler orchestra start­ed off the overlings events. Then Rev. E. J. Derquist delivered the Welcome to th? Sons. The Boys Choir, consist­ing of ten boys whose average age was pbout twelve years then sun

" two selections. Calvin 'Hooker wa next, his topic being "The Welcome to the Fathers." The Father 's Quar­tette was to have appeared on the program but on account of illness of two of them they were unable to sing. Lester HufT of Pingree sang a solo Tina responded to an encore. The Son's Quartette was next but it turn­ed on' to be a trio as they were also one *>.y. ' Nevertheless they did the best they could considering5 the fact that Don Swarthout was obliged to sing >oth bass and tenor. America w-H* thensung-by- the entire assembly who H mair.ed standing while ring-in;:. McPhorson Smith of the .county boy .••rout council made several an-rounr- merits and Dr. Noble of the Howell Presbyterian church deliver­ed the add re as. He took for hia topic-

Oil at 527 Ft. A Small Oil Pocket it Struck on

Smith Farm Near South Lyon

Reports Attack By Bandit

The Weekly Church Program

Drillers of the Smith Petroleum Co. of Chester, West Virginia who are seeking oil on the farm of Sup­ervisor W. K. Smith about a mile and a half south of New Hudson, and who h;st week obtained encouraging sampU's of erude oil from the 527 foot hoh»_tiiex_.JiauL_siink^_ai,e._going deeper into the. earth hoping to find in the Dundee sand oil in sufhVient quantity to bring in a Mowing well.

There seemed to be no limit to the oil found at the 527 foot depth and it tested out well. O. A. Smith, in

l eha ige of the drilling, said the oil pocket at this depth probably is not of f-uffiqient quantity to be of any pa r tvu la r value1. He stated however that it was most encouraging.

—-—iii^bc-licvcs if there is much oil it will be found in the Dundee sand, buF

j C r r e i i i C M M t > We believe it was Bill Shakespeare I who once remarked "Sweet a re the \ Use* cf Adversity. The cur ren t s ta te

t h s ! o f ^<>}1 eS4U 'on s e e m s to have produc-I ed a few good results if it has caused {much discomfort. According to the i repor t . filed by- t h a different prose­

cuting attorneys the re has been a

i\

Former Gregory Man \» Attached and I Beaten by Bandit

CATHOLIC CHURCH SERVICE Sunday Divine Sevice at S:30 and that they will havi

10:30 A. M. each Saturdav morn-Cathechism

at 8:30.

L. R.

^ed to show any speak of. P inckncy Read Paselk Meabon Dink -A Kennedy

Miller for Smith, Hall Battle for Paselk, Basydlo f o r I Lester Huff responded with two more

F. F. C

. G. , G.

Ypsilanti Res. Duffy

Jackson Kline

Crane Ferrh

"Abraham Lincoln" and told of the many l^s^ojLs_which_ coujdbe learned from bis life. He denjvTl the statement that. Lincoln was an infidel or a man ; of no religious belief although he ad-niitt "i that he was not a member of any church. Dr. Noble's talk vJas well

i n i g Confessions

for |

TTurrTyTTCenne^y;"Gerald- Clttrttm

K—^fc.p'.° 1^1 given,.-.ml ihonld -famish, foott fnr 1 for Miller,. m u r . h serious reflection and thought.

Claiming to have been beat r ,n ami : left lying in the street when he told a young man who had offered him a ! ride" ;md then demanded ht"> Hioney that he had no money , John McClear 63, 735 Christy avenue, appeared at police1 JieadQiiarters early Saturday night and asked officers to make a .search for his assailant.

r Cuts and bruises on McCIear's fa.ee

testified to his having been struck, detectives state, but they wore unable to finnLidffiTiyf~~a--sirugglc near the corner of Fir>t and Morreil streets where McClear .claims, he was attack­ed, they reported.

According to McClear'? story to police, he was walking home from town and at the corner of West Mich- j igan i:\cnue and Blackstone street a j -young WtW-ffi ' lrfar asked him-if ••• 1

:30. Saturday evening at

Rev. Lewis M Dion Pastor

BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. P. F. Ksic.__Pa.-tor

Services each Sunday Morning Worship ^ . . ^ . . Special arid separate seryic little folks. Sunday School

Class for all [J. V. P. I." Kvening Worship I hurs. evening prayer scrvi.-

• i°J.30

for tht

. 11:45

7 :00 ... 8:00 — R 7 W

a better idea of what they have there in another couple of weeks. At the present time no one can tell just what will be found iind where they will find wh&t may be there. ^

The Smith Company began drilling on the Smith farm about a couple of months ago. Day and night shifts are employed at this time. Frop;rt'ss now

• is rather slow as they are drilling j through rock.__South Lyon Herald.

marked decrease in cr ime in the past two years. Crime showed a decrease in 11)30 and a still g rea te r one in IW1. This serves to indicate tha t the crim^ wave which had its incept­ion immediately following the world W7Ti^7Trut>i?l(ting. "

According to the report filed by I> iv James Vaughn, health officer for the city of Detroit, that tin city at the present time is en­joying the lowest death rate of its existance. Deaths in Detroit last year numbered 13,40:] which gives a ra te of S.s per 1,000. In 1930 it was 9.3 and in 1!)2!» it was 13.4. Of those who died last year heart disease claimed 2,1!'5, cancer 1,113, tuberculosis 1,-

iim-umonia 1,04(1, violence 1,-JJi_l 010, -.poplexy, nephritis, suicide, and appendicitis followed in the order named

Dr. Vaughn lays this decreased death iate to the fact that on account of hu l< of money people a rc living more normal lives, the climate has been good and there have been no epidemic.;. Also people are more care­ful of their diet and preventive mrasLip'.v are successfully combating' contagt-ous diseases.

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH— E. J. Berquist, Minister

Miss Elly Iscler, Organist Mrs. E, Baughn, Directress of Music

Percy Swarthout, Supt. of S.S. Mevnin;: Worship .. 10:30 a. m Juvoi '* Church . .. . I 0 :30 a. m-

SPANISH WAR VETERANS ADOPT RESOLUTION

Livingston County Spanish War veterans at a recent meeting adopted the following resolution in regard to. the T.M- Mastern disturbance:

Howell, Michigan " FTbnifiTy- 3, TTT32

l.iviii^to'i ' ' amp No. C>2. Mich. L. S. W. V.

At legular meeting hel<

John Werrderh BirdrproKcctrtfng at­torney of Ingham county has been calling around in this county the past week. He announces that ho is in the race for the nomination for congress-man in tin- Sixth District to stay. Mr. Pird's chief claim to fa7rre--4fc-ihc_ fact that it was his probe of the act­

ivities of the Federal Bond and Mort-gage do. last summer that stirred Waynt county, state and federal of­ficials into action.

;i'd

solos 'and" the ~TsIev orcheslra w i t l r p -

evnnivp: program. u .

'or c Sundav Schoo V

February adopted following 1'esolu-

U»tfing t ha t -ih«> ITnit.pd Stntrx

M l > • >

ftrr-Bayydlo; Ypsi, Baker for John. j-^rrrotl^T^^eTtnw-^vhii-.-h mncluded the] 1^;H--rtTrrt'^rhT^t^tli son. Field gpals Dinkel 8, Meabon 4, Smith 3, Battle L Read 1, Basydlo 1, Duffy 1, Kline 3, Ferris 3. "Foul goals— Rasydlo 1, Jackson 1, Kline 1. Fouh< Pinckney 4, Ypsi 5. Referee

Hooker.

went 'd a ride. McClear accepted ami, according tn his report to officers, he j r h r i s t i ; ; 1 1 Endeavor wa's t-fi-k-un down F-ir^t street to- Jvlar-+-j^;rq

MH; Lg dn'v

1 i :30 a. .i! 0:30 p. m

-7^30-pr-m--er stoppe

'J'

STOCKBRIDGE PLAYS HERE THURSDAY

The Pinckncy Independents will meet the Stockbridge team in a double header at the Pinckney Com­munity hnll on Thursday evening, February 11. The" filSt-gpmie^wnUtjm at 7:30 and the second a t i T : 0 0 . Pinckncy played this team twice last year J nd was fortunate enough to win the last game by two points.

NOTICE

I n; ve purchased of Daisy As(]uith, Stockbridge, a permanent waving machine and facial chair. I am pre­pared to give all kinds of facials and a special for one week only of a .$4.00; Duradem, LcMur or Sheitan permanent waves complete with ring­let ends for $2.50.

Dorothv Carr

driver! ,fn wi'hTedi .- ";

e

BABY CHICKS^

after turning ofT First street.

L According to McClear, the then got out" of the car, around to McClearV .-ide an* manded his money. .McClear .-UUed he had no money and the fight which ended with" McClear being left un­conscious in .the stn et s tar t 'd . . Jackson Citizen Press.

John McClear formerly li Gregory where he worked a.-> tractor and constructed many es and barns in this section.

"WoTstrip- TT7~: —(:'hoir Kehcmv.aU— — Wednesilav evening

i p.

lor . . * : i •> "TcTr "".""' ~ . 7~:45

l i a y e - m e e t i n g , T h u r s . . 7 : 3 0 p. in. Orc 'e - t ra nrac^ise. Thurs. 7:30

merit avoid by all honorable in its power, any participation

ejfi i; •)(•<• in the Far Kastern

> th.e.t e .()•>' honorable means power of th(j I'nited States

Th" recent doings over in China seem lo have stirred up some of the~ old war spirit which flamed here in liMS. Notwithstanding the horrors of

"wal• TTFT,:-t-he^'^-Avould -be many--wtWng— -LLoL-iaiLuL-faj oveiicnn dtrty-in Chin.-i.

Howrvm1. thrre seems to be little

j vu

-I

d in

ious-

CARIXX>E^tHANlC

r

We sincerely wish to thanTT OTe" King's Daughters for their kindness in remembering us with the beautiful box of candy and fruit during our recent illness.

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Rrigham

POSTMASTERS NAMED President Hoover has named Frank

G. Leeson postmaster of Manchester for another term and . William C. Miller postmaster a t Pinckney. The nominations were sent to the U. S. senate Monday.

Purebred White Leghorns, White and Barred Rocks, Wyandotte Reds and Ophingtons, !>.00 to $11.00 per hundred. _._„____.

Custom Hatching .S3.00 per hund-red. All Brooders 10 per cent oiT.

.. — ---,-- ..,

CREGOR BAPTLST CHURCH

L. S. Slaybaugh Pastor

'i'i • church i> invited to atteml Tabn ue le M-rvice in Jackson the ing of I'ebruary 1 'ith.

Sunday was every member c;i; dav.

Hi-e\-

\ e > , -

wa\ the' H i l l '

et l l

(

Oakland Hills Poultry Farm, Farmington, Mich.

> r

•• is- :

rr ts.-.;

O. E. S. CARD PARTY Th•- Q. F>. S, are sponsoring a

Washington party at theiij, hall in Pinckney Thursday evening, Feb. 18. Card* from S :30 to 11 followed by refreshments and dancing, each.

WILLIAM GREGORY William Gregory, 4". son >-:' fh

late William and Susan Strait!) Gre­gory of Dexter township, died at hi,-home in Ann Arbor Wednesday m>rn

--mg--a-f-tc~r~a— ?»h«4^jlln<'ss. The (|,c<as-ed was bom in Washtenaw county in what was known as Hudson. Mills

j but had lived in Ann Arbor for the past '24 years where he was a nvmb er of the Fisher Hardware firm. In. 1!»0"J lie was married to Clara iiell of Dexter township who with one. son i«nd one daughter survives him.

;.Uee<lanee to .both church and

W

Sunday school Sunday. Goal for next Sunday in the Sun

day .-( hoe I i II on yen.

Following are -Mi>n

G'ovV tin i t e r r i t i iy by its nationals, and tha t ; Ami :i an armed forces

-, now stationed of on their a be stationed at the scene of

dispute in the Far Ivast, to be re-' as rapidly a- er-v lie consist-

v i t h t h e ) - e m < ) \ ;>

i iiiace of safely.

Al •:> Mint the (Juvei iiiinnt i>l thi 4 'mtn-' KUi4t,LS J22ake no elfort to pro t e d :»r )-emove fro Til th 1 itel'V jH'opertv owned

j likelyhoyd of their- l e t t i n g their wish, anyway. T h e Corps closed

ment i^-usrd- t o providr for- n o t " t n i l , - p r r , r n t t i m r lnfywRyrTrilt

iie<iiate r-vacuation ol disputed \ Unjt«• 11 States Maidne I its eii'.i.stment oflice in Detroit last

md naval s u n i t ] M , a s t h ( , i r ( 1 U 0 t a w a s C Q m_

pletely . full and the navy office at Detroit announced last week that of

i 112 application- received in January | only '.'.'•', would be accepted. Armv en-

I- Americans j H s t m , . n t > ; j n . . ( , s o a t a , (>w ( , b b / T h f s

i last hranch of the sendee lacks the romantic appeal of the first two as it do< - not have the travel advantage'

bv indi\-idual

; disputed ter-or controlled

or enrporat ions, at the

Offej'i i| bv them.

"O*

t l O S e

T T

Bill 20c ^ ^ is also sundved bv two brothers.

SPECIAL COMMUNICATION Special communication of Living­

ston Lodge No. Id F. & A.

Among those from Pinckney who attended the funeral of Mrs. Rene Menard a t Northfield Monday were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Eulcr and fam­ily, Henry Kice and wife, Mesdames Mike Lavey a«d Will Lcdwidge, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Doyle and son, Jun­ior, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baughn, Louis Coyle and wife.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ovitt of Gre-gory, F ^ d Merrill and wife of Fow-lerville- were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Bland.

Mr. and Mrs.' O. L. Campbell and \ daughter, Leona, spent the week end ~* with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Campbell in

Ann Arbor j Mrs. Alma Harris returned to De- '

t rolt Sunday after spending the past • week with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Snehan. '

Mier l^imarljrrQ^Lynrh and Gene1

Chandler of Kalamazoo »pent the ^e t¥^ i f t t ^wr th -Mm-M3Ty^^ — \

Mr. and Mr*. Rex Smith visited M m Cynihtsr -WtHmiw in Marion

—Sunday. J Fred Teeple and wife,j>f J e t t c y * - '

vHIe were Sunday visitors at th«» home pt Mr. and Mrs. N. O. Frye. '

M. on T3T

M issimiT, VM i>. I'eai Heed, Sarah*Lamborn, Agnes Arnold. Joseupiuw* JJowIott, Christine Howlett. Susie Placeway, Hetta Marshall, Bessie Marsliiill, Lotttt-• F.rearhy, Ruth Whitehead, Katlieiine Meyei-.-. Mrs. {hartley, Lauva Whiteheafi, and Mrs. Kockwell, liose Buhl and Mrs. Baker.

ire counting | l l l l j n i ; ) t , . ,^,, , , , ,^. ,,f r n i t e , | States)

: ('iti'/.'• i' -• or at peril of tin ii" live...

Also that, we uri'-e ail vitiyeiiA-atul who are t:lkinfT ivT, Gertrud'

James of Webster and Arthur of Flint and a sister, Mrs. Harry Mar shall of.Dexter.

Funeral services were hold at St Andrews church Friday at 2:00 p. m

.1

Saturday evening, February Work in the thTrd d egree. A good at- j Run il was in Forrest tendance is desired on this occasion ^ j y ]1( Dexter whew and it is especially necessary that all members of the Fellowcraft team be present. Rf^reshments will be .-.erved following initiation.

P. W. Curlett, Sec'y.

I TAX NOTICE i 1 will be at the Pinckney Stat I Lank to r e i v e taxes every Saturda;

until 'ur ther notice.

o th i r i 'nited Spanish War Veterans Camp- to request their representativ-'•• in Congress and in tin- Senate to follow the policy set forth in this re­solution.

Also that this resolution !>•• sent to ail our Congressmen and representa­tives and to our State mid National Commanders with the request that it be transmitted to ail I'nited Spanish War Veteran Camps in 'he state and thro'.u.h their Commanders to other Commander's outside Michigan.

Comrade Burt C. Daller, AdjL

FALLS FROM L»GHT POLE

While working at the Mich. S taV Sauaianum near Howell Saturday, Arlhut PeiryTHJ to the^groutid from an ! •> foot light p(de when his safety belt b< came unfastened. Ho was tak-' " to the MeJ'her.son Hospital at Howell whejv he will Ix confined for some weeks. MJV IVj'ry was engaged in installing the new laundry sendee at the sanatorium.

Rev. Lewis of Ann Arbor officiating. Lawn ceme-the Masonic

burial sen-ice WHS given by Golden Rule Lodge of Ann Arbor of which the deceased was a meinb"i\

"X Max Ledwidge

Putnam Township Tre;u

—O"

CARD OF THANK We wish to express our thanks and

appreciation to all who so kindly as­sisted in any way in this our time of sorrow. To Rev. H. V. Clark for

-hi; iUe--age of xmnlorL To Hugh

O" FOLLOWING A DOLLAR BILL In order to get a line on the life

and adventures of a dollar bill the Waukegan, 111., Chamber of Com­merce started out a new bill with a. circular attached, requesting every person handling the bill to make a notation of its use. Here is the his­tory for fourteen daya. changing hands for service:

Five times for salary. Five times for tobacco. Five times for cigarettes. Three times for camtyr"

j THE KINC'S DAUGHTERS MEET! Despite the inclement weat lvr l

there was an excellent attendance at the regular meeting of the King's Daughters, held at the home of Mrs. Fred Read, Thursday afternoon.

Th-; devotlonirf and business follow­ed 'the luncheon 'and an interesting

MRS. MARY MURPHY Mrs. Mary Murphy, widow of the

late William Murphy dicTl at the home of l v r daughter, Mrs. Martha St 'in in Detroit Sunday, February 7. The remains were brought to

MRS. LUCILE MENARD Mrs. Lucile Merrard, ,24, wife

Rene Menard, died at the Keren ing Hospital in Detroit last Friday af t - r j a long illne>s. The deceased was th- i olrje.i surviving daughter of Mr. and I Mrs Joseph Stackable of Hamburg j town-hip and was born in Northfield (

town-hip, Washtenaw county on th

J Milmr for his thoughtfulnc.o and to j. the many friends for the beautiful

floral offerings. i

Mrs. S. (',, Topping Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Briggs K. L. Topp ng and family.

O

the home "of Patrick Kennedy in this ( n t h d».y of August, 1!»07. She was a village and the funeral was held from ' m r m h , T - 0f the graduating class of St. Mary's church, Wednesday, al 10:30 p. M. Rev. Lewis Dion officiat­ing. Burial was in St. Mary's ceme-

Th. but c

.letter from the state president was *( , ry read also a letter of thanks from Mrs. Dorothy Ketchum of the U. of M. Hospital, for the garments nnd toys srmt the needy path nts during the yulotido.

Mrs. T». C. Daller directed the fol-

T w u - e T o r i n c h ' s Turhishings. Twice fov shaves. Once for automobile ncccnwricrv Once for bacon. Once tor wanning powder. Once for garters. Once (or tooth pa«tc,

deceased was born in Ireland ine to t.hw country in lKW.

She was married to William Murphy in IS70. Sun-iving are four daught-J home. ers, Mis. Jack Pruess and Mrs, Wil­son St< in of Detroit and Mrs. Joe

lowing program: piano ~soln. Miss. Morrisey and Mrs. David Bruce of Planchi' Mart in; r< adi ng. M rs^ ^ r m4^ a < ^^n^~Also^-4v^^ons - , Michael and I ial wa> \p th^ Northfield «emeteryT

VILLAGE CAUCUS

Notice is Hereby Given

Thar a Citizen's Village Caucus will I b,. held at Village F i m Hall. ! On Tuesday, Feb. ' 23 , 1932 •

At 2 o'clock P. M. For the purpose of placing in nom­ination candidates for Village Office*

the ensuing ^ r m and for t h e

1'inckney high school in 102."). Surviv­ing are her husband and two children Patriria and Rene jr., her parents, Mr. Mid Mrs. Joseph Stackable. one sister, Leola, and six brothers, Jost-ph '»"" of Howell. Lawrence of Lansing and [, 4- - * ,

tran.sactwjr of such o the r business a s may prop^nly come before it.

LouU, Henry, John an<J Aloysious at

Tlv funeral \vas_ held from St. Patrick's church a t Northfield Mon-<lay, RevTFVrThotrias offu-iating^-Buiv

Ry o r d e r ^ Com. Signed Nellie Gardner

Clerk of Village of Pinckney,

Maycroft; vocal solos, Miss Dorothy Wilson.

The next meeting will be held a t the home of the Misses Hoff, with 'Mrs. Louis Clinton and Mrs. Reginald J land Schafer as entertainment committee. I lo*t>.

Andrew of Jackson, Patrick of Leslie, William of Munith and John < f- Sw»-field. A brother, Michael who lives in Hudson and one, Patrick, of Ire-

ire also left to mourn their

- H O M E B A K E D C O O P S t

Michigan.

n — -"NOTICE

-*— / f Home made b read and frted enkea Old time Dance at the Portage

on sale at Rill's place every day. Bak- Lake Falivion, Red Hen, Friday, Feb. ing done by order. Will also deliver. 12. Music by Kastlakr. Gent* ftty , Phone 44 Beth Kennedy! ladies 25c. ' ' % $

A.

/'•>V5

&•:._ > t #"' '.WlR

MAD LAUGHTER HBLKA8SD BY CENTRAL PREM AMOCUTIOH—OOFTsUUsT. IMS

A THRILLING MYSTERY STORY + by MILES BURTON

h - —

t

WEEK OF JANUARY 24 Thu early part of the week of Jan­

uary 24 promises to be colder than the latter part of last week due to the [ ^ ? incoming of a higher barometric pres-j sure. There will be some wind and' It was a va-ary business. It seemed imperturbably. "If we meet any of probable rain or snow. However, to him that >uch infrequent passers-by\ your friends I'll explain that we're these conditions will mitigate during! as he met gazed at him with hostile; merely having a stroll together. Now, Monday or Tuesday and a day or so! curiosity, and followed him with their then, come along and don't let's have of calmer weather is expected. ' <•>'*••> as he disappeared into the mist, j any more of your swank."

By the middle of the week there will! His ears w>re constantly alert for the! The p{dice station was not far be- a more decided upward turn of the) measured footfall of a policeman.! away, ana , they reached it without thermometer readings and the next: Ev» ry constable in London seemed t o | further adventure. Mr. Herridge was two or three days are expected to be ' be abroad that night. Several times |.led before the sergeant, who regarded much warmer. -^r- Herridge was compelled to turn him with marked disfavor while the

From the middle of the week until j'suddenly and dodge up some side! constable told his story. But what about Friday there will be rain or street till the guardian of the law had) filled Mr. Herridge with amazement snow and strong wind storms. There; passed. More than once, after one orj was that he was obviously not recog-will be more or less moisture in the •, other of these detours, ho lost his way j nized. Was it possible that during air, but restratfHftg-influences \n pewe^HH^-pa-mc. yeixed htm at"the thought the hours he had spent wanderirfg at this time will hinder any great; that the last vestiges of the fog might! through London the news of his escape amount from falling as rain or snow, clear away before he could reach his from the plainclothes men had not There will be drizzles of rain, flurries goal. Hoxton appeared to him as an been circulated? If this were so, of snow or mists and fogs. These lat- Ultima Thule, scarcely to be attained; there was no point in his giving him-ter will be dangerous to traffic inland: in the course of a lifetime. And even! self away before he need. and on the Great Lakes. ! when he got ther •? He moistened his; "It 's as true as I stand here, ser-

During Friday or Saturday tempera-—lips nervously as he considered how he, geant," he protested. "Couple o' chaps tures will change and start the down-1 should approach Ginger Murdoch, and' in a pub at Islington bet me I ward motion, but a cold spell at this ! what reply that- uncertain-tempered' wouldn't walk to the Bank and back time will not be very long lived. j gentleman would make to his repre- ' without being spotted. Bet me a fiver,

Freezing to Death I sentations. i they did, and seeing that it was a bit The Chinese war and contract I foggy-like, 1 took them on. Only came

bridge have been slightly over- CHAPTER III up to town today, I did. Thought I ehs.inwoH *f lato hy tVt HHjurrT™* | Mr—Ilnnidgt?^—<rar—lay through mighfnnd a job o' wFrT'To'TTeep' my what happens when one freezes to ' Pentonville. and as he climbed the hill, wife and kids. What would be the

he realized to his horror that the fog good of my lying to you, sergeant?" wa; perceptibly thinning. This would "Som'. folks tell lies because it

death. The discussion started, accord­ing to The Literary Digest, when Ralph Abercromby, author of the book "W reather," stated those in the last stages of freezing generally strip themselves of all clothing. Prof. M. W. Harrington disputes the statement on the grounds that he had never wit­nessed such cases in all his years' ex­periences with the American blizzard. In this argument there seems to be some heat over cold facts.

"I've got them here, sir, and I 'd like you to have a look at them, if you don't mind."

He produced the handcuffs, and laid them out for the Inspector to examine. Brooks took them up and turned them over carefully. They were an ordi­nary regulation pair, such as could be found in any police station. But Breoks seemed to find them interest­ing, for he* examined every inch of them with the utmost care. At last he put them down with a puzzled frown. "I t ' s a rum thing, sergeant, but I can't see the- -official ^stamp- OB 4hew,-'J - h e said.

"No, sir ," replied the sergeant. "That 's what seemed queer to me. They're brand new, so it isn't as if it could have been rubbed off. Looks to me as if they'd been issued without being stamped."

"I t looks like it, certainly," replied Brooks. He walked across the room to the window, where he stood staring reflectively into the yard beneath. That a pair of handcuffs could have oome interfuse at-suijLPolice station

Btrtner^Sfortes

Bird C o n s e r v a t i o n "You naughty, cruel boy!" said the

fashionably dressed young woman to the boy she had found despoiling a btrdV-rte^tT-1-'How can you be so hetrrt- — less as to take those eggs? Think of the poor mother bird when she com".-b a c k a n d ^ - " - - - - _

"That 's all right, miss,"interrupt* (1 the boy; "the mother bird is de;'.<l."

The young woman's expression >•- -fleete<j disbelief. "How do you know?" she asked, sharply.

••She's on your hat." was the \T\>\\ .

Correct The tt-acher was putting qui .-t .(>:,.-

T O thee ta sir _ " . "Whnt iln w. rail a man.1' h'_ u-ki^i—-

"who keep.* on talking and talk.r/. when people are no longer iiiT.;-

-^-sU-d-?" - - - - - ~ "Pleese, -.ir." said a hoy. "-

teacher."

i l ) : "What ThaVc the W a y !

l e a t h e r (to new pupil) your father's name, dear?"

Xew Pupil: "Daddy." Teacher: "Yes, dear. But

does your mother call h im?" New Pupil: "She don't call

anything. She'likes him,"

w

without being stamped with the official mark was unthinkable. He was well acquainted with the routine of the Stores Department, and he knew that the absence of the stamp could not have escaped the many eyes which would have inspected them before is­sue.

Brooks turned abruptly from the window. "I'll have a look at your Mr. Tomkins, if you don't mind, sergeant ," he said. "Perhaps I'd better see him alone. I may be able to persuade him to unbosom his aching heart to me."

The Inspector entered the cell, and B smile appeared u p o n lils. "tace as" his eyes beheld its occupant. But it was" not until the sergeant had retired out of earshot that he spoke.

"Well, I never! If it isn't my old friend Pussy Herridge," he exclaimed. "Whft't. hronp'rir. vnn intn rhiq p f l r | nf

bracelets on. Didn't know where I wai , Mr. Brookat, and that 's a fact. I mustehave walked miles through the fog. I t ' s a mercy I wasn't run over or something. And as for the tools, why, them chaps must have put them in my pockets, sir." *

The Inspector's face took an ex­pression of respectful admiration. "Gee, I wish I had your imagination, Pussy," he exclaimed. The Chief's al­ways saymg that the first quality in a detective is imagination. I'd be one of the Big Four if I had you to help ma. In fact, I think I'll put you away where I know where to find you for a bit. I can come to you for ad­vice now and then, can't I ? "

Brooks left the cell, and walked "slowly back along the the corridor to the sergeant 's" room. "I haven*t got it yet, sergeant," he said 'cheerfully. "The man is an old friend of mine. He's never done time yet, bu t he's been more qr less under observation for a couple of years. His nam© is Tom Herridge, and he lives in Creek fitifiat,—WAppi»g-,—But how h e eame by those handcuffs I can' t make out. Bring him up and get him remanded for further evidence. I'll have a look round Wapping myself tonight ."

On his way back to Scotland Yard the Inspector devoted his mind to this curious adventure of Pussy Herridge. That there was more in it than met the eye, he was convinced. He was pretty certain that the handcuffs with which he had been manacled did not belong'to the police. In the first place ther© was the difficulty of accounting f o r the ahserx'A nf ifh,

Underfed CkiUtren Increase in Homes

Of Unemployed The jfcesent economic emergency

has meant a qterWng increase in the number of poorly, and even insuf­ficiently nourished children, according t o : the January issue of "Publ ic Health Nursing." Tables giving the normal weights of children of cer ta in heights are no longer regarded as a n infallible means of detecting malnu­trition, continues "Public Heal th Nursing." For stunted growth is a symptom that appears only af ter the harm has been done. In these t imes particularly, the most watchful meth­ods must be employed for discovering the families where the food supply is ill planned or insufficient.

"If malnutrition as a result of the depression is to be combatted," says "Public Health Nursing," we should prevent it ra ther than at tempt to cure it. Prevention for unemployed fami­lies requires finding the underfed c held re n ra ther than the children whose growth has be©n effected. To wait for evidence of retarded growth is like waiting for rachitic deformities to develop before administering the necessary vitamins."

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and in the second, it was unthinkable tha t the escape of a pirsoner should __ _ not have been immediatelyr_nc^if#tfc(^J Farmers of the county and o ther the police. Who* then, had hWidc'uffed persons interested now may learn the

the world, 'Pussy? There surely aren' t any cribs to crack in Pentonville, are

-there ? You d+dr^t mean—too break into the gaol by any chance, did you?"

"I didn't mean to break into any-I where, Mr. Brooks," replied Herridge

earnestly. "You know me, sir, and you know I wouldn't be likely to do

j such a thing." ,

him, and why? Inspector Brooks had made an ex­

haustive study of the methods of the rival gangs of criminals which thronged the underworld of London. He knew to a certainty that Mr. Her­ridge was involved with these, and h© had a pretty shrewd suspicion that the machinations of on© of the gangs were responsible for his adventure. It was, f'or ^ instance, quite possible that some­body had found it convenient to keep Herridge out of the way while some coup was in- preparation, in order to prevent him or his friends from antici­pating the attempt, whatever it might be. Herridge might have been^lured to some convenient house, .and there

"Oh, I know you all right, Pussy," replied Brooks. "You wouldn't dream[ of staiR-rrrg- the--wjute flower of aj blameless life. But rPTvery thought- i

locked up and handcuffed. J F r o m this seclusion he had escaped, and had been -on h i s w a y home when the Pen-tonville constable arrested him. Not at all an unlikely theory.

The more Brooks considered it, the more he liked it. It would account for the amazing fairy stories Herridge had chosen to tell.—If tht* gang, which had trapped him had been a powerful one, he would not have dared to put _t_h_e police on the track of ii^mftmhars,

'~~~~faLj2f.you to carry those prftty__little_ tools of yours about with you. They're

'so apt to-produce a wrong impression. •Especially as one of th^m has the

. .marks of paint, still on i t—You might! at least keep them clean." !

Mr. Herridge, his eyes fixed intently —on the- Inspector, made no reply. His

He-rridge would realize the fate likely to--overtake—him'—if ^vmentioned names, and would prefer to submit to the inconvenience of a few days in the celTs. No serious charce could be

.i.ni

Not Speedy 'Have you ever been Ki.-.-ei: He

before?" She: "Y-y-y-e-, 'e-cause I n-nev r

could s-s->ay n-n-no fast enough."

_Dig for Dud Little Ethel : : "Mother, arc you the

nearest relative I've go t?" Her mother: "Yes, dear, and your

father is the closest."

once more at a .-lightly increased pace And at the very first corner he almost collided with a policeman.

He might .-till have saved himself but the encounter was the final blow

-to-iw ^hattc^^Lnerves. In a sudden and unreasoning aforrss of panic he

"The policeman's hand had closed around the chain of the handcuffs."

ni-ver do. he must keep to the lower comes natural ," replied the sergeant, ground He-swymg-roxTttd^arid^set out "We'll fix you up with board and

lodging lei- the night, anyhow, till we rind out a bit .more about you in the morning."

"But you can't put me in the cells!" expostulated Mr. Herridge. "I ain't done nothing you can charge me with." : "^

whole1 faculties were devoted to the task of discovering whether or not Brooks knew of his previous night's adventure.

"hrtd a ga i n s t him , T O T , "jrftrr"attr^tlTeTe-wa.* no law against people walking about in handcuffs.

took to his heels and ran blindly in the first direction which presented it­self.

"Charge you!" exclaimed the ser­geant, "I'll charge you all right. Being in unlawful possession of a pair of

The policeman, amazed at this con-j handcuffs, the property of Hies Maj-fession of guilt, gave immediate esty the King. Put him-in number six, chase. Even then Mr. Herridge might George, have escaped, had his terror not been' * * • so txtreme that he failed to notice the curb on the opposite side of the road. He tripped and fell, and before he could drag him>eif to his feet the po­liceman's hand was upon him.

" 'Ere, what's the game?" asked the policeman indignantly. "Think

As a result sage from the Yard, Detectivi

o f a telepho n ic mes-sergeant to Scotland

• Inspector Brooks of the C. I. D. arrived at the police sta­tion in the early hours of the follow­ing morning. Brooks was an imposing and formidabel figure, standing well

v u u V plH.uiiK.a ndinH Uf tip and run, \™* - ^ ?"*'* '» h i* s n c k-> with a chest

r

RESTFUL SLEEP for FRETFUL,

FEVERISH CHILD — With Castoria'i regulation

When your child tosses and cries out in his sleep, It means he is not comfortable. Very often the trouble is that poisonous waste matter is not being carried off as it should be. Bowels need help—mild, gentle help —but effective. Just the kind Cas-toria gives. Castoria is a pure vege­table preparation made specially for children's ailments. It contains no harsh, harmful drugs, no narcotics. Don't let your child s resWand your own ' " " '

or what? T l lo , what's th is?" Mr. Herridge's had had fallen out

of his .-leeve>. ;<nd the handcuffs glint-j ed patently in the light of the police­man's lantern. The latter examined: them with puzzled interest.

But Mr. Herridge'* wits were corn-

like a bull and a voice like a foghorn He had risen from the ranks by the merit of several brilliant pieces of work. Behind his massive appearance he had a (juick and shrewd brain, and a rough good nature which had earned him, even among criminals, the repu-

ir.g back t o him. This man at l e a s t ; t a t i o n o f b < ' i n F a w n i t e ™an. had evidently not been warned of his1 "It 's a queer thing about this chap, escape, and in the fact lay the glim—sir," " ' d thp sergeant,—"Of course mer of a chance for him. j his account of himself is all bunkum.

'•What'** this mean?" asked the po­liceman sternly.

"It 's a bet ." replied Mr. Herridge earnestly. "There was a couple of chaps in a pub what bet me I would not walk across London in these for thin<.'- without being copped. I'll be netting back and pay up ."

"PI* nty of time for that ," remarked "h" policeman pleasantly. "You com.' along with me and tell the sergeant all about It. He's a rare chap for a bet .

We went through his pockets anil found a very decent collection of tools and a pair of gymnasium shoes. He's one of the regulars, all right, and no doubt you will be able to identify him."

"Did he give you his name and ad­dress, sergeant?" asked Brooks.

The sergeant smiled. "He said his name WAS Tomkins, that he had a wife and family in Wigan, and that he came to London for the first time yes-

Ar.d I'd come quietly, too, if I - terday," he replied. "As a matter of fact,, u blind imon eould tell tftat he is

K

C A S T O R I A Why, people will think I'm arrestedX" "Funny how people, make these lit­

tle mistakes," replied the policeman

'-'•And your man iQi

was you. beinterjrupted.Ajprpm^i'djQse . Mr. Herridge's heart sank, JThcJajcockne** and. that -he's never been

of T^storia will urge stubborn little policeman's hand had closed round the ' farther than Margate."

always has the name: no P ? - ^ l : t y of escape. • J? . _ _ „ _ " I O U V C . no call to march me / y *//¥/>/ /1' through the streets like th is ," he ^*u*rry /<&tcAtM whined. "I'll come quietly enough if

VOU'H take, thes-e hlffHtwi-thinffB off.

ing about with a pair of handcuffs on, did he?" said Brooks. "That ' s a queer' thing, for we've had no rrew*-of a prisoner escaping from his escort, i o u sa.w him yourself with the hand­cuffs on. I suppose?"

'"He had them on when he was brought in," replied the se rgeant

CHAPTER IV "Come, now, Pussy," continued the

Inspector, 'Tha t story you told the sergeant won't do, you know You

it to amuse those at Wigan. We're

might have kept kiddies of yours bound to find out the t ruth in an hour or two, anyhow. You may just as well cough up the story and get it over."

rTBrooks' "eyes the matter was of very little, importance, so far as Her­ridge himself-was concerned. But it might form a clue to the machinations of some powerful gang, whose, activi­ties, if revealed, might throw light upon hitherto unsolved crimes. Trace the gang which had found it conven-jent_jo_kidnap Herridge^discover their reasons for so doing,~~ah7f~a whole series of interesting facts might be dis­covered.

So Brooks reasoned. The difficulty was, how to make Herridge speak. Brooks, essentially kind-hearted as he was., of tpn rep-rett.pM thp pre jnd i fpg nf

Mecosta Farm Land Mapped, Described

All soils on all farms in Mecosta county, Michigan, are mapped and de­scribed in a soil survey report jus t is-

11 le buitmii of ~c1rerntstry-an< soils of the United Sta tes-depar tment of agriculture.

names and the locations of the differ­ent soils on any farm in the county by reading the report and studying t h e map in it. The repor t names 18 dis­tinct soils as present in Mecosta coun­ty in addition to peat and muck. I t locates them on the map by assigning a color for each soil. I t tedls the color, texture and depth of each type of soil,, the character of the subsoil and whether it is favorable to the down­ward drainage and upward movement of soil moisture or whethe-r it is hard-pan or an impenetrable subsoil which retards root growth and the move­ment of soil moisture.

Isabella loam, the most extensive soil in the county, is de~scrhbed_by the-report as one of the most fertile. Kent silt loam, Fox gravelly sandy

listed among the more productive soils in this report. Coloma sand, the sec­ond most extensive soil of the county is described as a soil on which yields are invariably low and crop, failures common,— - _

A copy of the report may be ob­tained free from Michigan congress-men or senators, or-from the office_of information, United States depart-m<int of agriculture. —

U. W. 2io^.lQ30—1-1&—1932,

Opportunity Aaieta

In a flash Mr. Herridge's mind was *made> up. Brooks did not know that he had taken the Hardway diamonds! Impossible as it seemed, he had not heard of his arrest by the plainclothes men. Perhaps they had not made their report yet, perhaps they were still searching for him! There was, of course, no hope of escape. Ultimately the news must come through. But Mr. Herridge, with the instincts of a rat in a trap, would fight to" the last gasp.

Rather because lying came to him naturally than in any hope of being believed, he Instantly framed a new story. "Well, I don't mind telling you, Mr. Brooks," he replied. "I didn't like to say it to the sergeant he-re. All the police aren' t like you, sir. Once they gets a down on a chap they don't give him a chance. Truth is, Mr. Brooks, I got properly blind last night and I don't rightly know what hap­pened." — " L e t that b-e an awful- warn ing-to-

civilization which disapproved of a lit­tle mild torture. Nothing desperate, of course, ust a glowing brazier with a few hot irons on it. Their actual application would scarcely be neces­sary. The presence alone-of this gen­tle stimulant would be quite sufficient to overcome the reluctance of crim­inals of the Herridge type— ._

The Inspector sighed as he forced his thoughts into more orthodox chan­nels. Denied the possibilities of physi­cal intimidation, he would Ve com­pelled to resort to subtler methods, Herridge, if he could not be made to speak, might be entrapped into state

you, Pussy," remarked the Inspector. "Carry on, my lad, and let's hear the sordid story of the debauch."

"Well, it was this way, sir. I'vei been getting a bit fed up with Wap­ping lately. I t 's no place~for a chap what wants to run straight. The. boys there persecutes an honest dhap some­thing terrible. So I looks about, and hears of a decent place in Islington and yesterday evening I goes up to have a look at it. Well, you know how it is, sir, I- walks into a pub, I don't rightly remember the name of it, and gets talking with a lot of y"o1mg chaps like myself."

"No doubt a most edifying con-r-i-v^iga^ioaT Pussy," commented- the._In-_

spector. "And what nex t?" "That ' s just what I can ' t tell you,

Mr. Brooks. It's my belief that they doped my drink. We hadn' t had more than a dozen rounds or so when I be­gins to feel all funny and sleepy like. And the next thing I knows, I was walking about with them blessed

ments which coultl be used as clues Brooks had an instinctive feeling that something pretty big lay behind the apparently trifling incident.

He was still thinking of what he should say when he next visited the imaginative Pussy when he entered the portals of Scotland Yard. But he had not penetrated very far into the recesses of the building wmen a col­league accosted him. "Hullo, Brooks, here you are at last!" he said. "The Chief has been looking for you for the last half hour ."

"Right! I'll go and see if I can com­fort him," replied Brooks.

He went up to the Assistant Com­missioner's room and knocked on the door. Bidden to enter, he found his Chief in consultation with an exquis­itely dressed man of about thir ty, with a curiously melancholy cast of coun­tenance, belied by a pair of twinkling eyes. The Assistant Commissioner looked up as the Inspector came in. "Ah, good morning, Brooks," he said. ^Thte i s Mr. Richard P^rmampton. You might spin your yarn to the In spectbiv-IWc1t,**'Z^

(To be continued) o

R«iirt>«HUdio . - - .r-Railroad Engineer: "Yep, I built

tho radio set all by myself, Bill.". Bill: " I believe it ; she whistles for

every station."

Cash for your":'farm, businesi, residence, etc. No matter where located. Free information. Black's Realty Co., Bex 17, Chippewa l"all>,. Wis. New Aviation Sensation: low priced; non-rt>m]>etitive; phenomenal demand. Need tx-tlusive representative sell dealers -and. con­sumer. Splendid opportunity. Dou?ias-Mc-Innis Co., 519 Main, Cincinnati, O. PECANS—Paper shell variety. Five pounds. for 98c f. o. b. Camilla. Ga. Send check with order. J. G. & P. E. Bailey, Camilla,

I "Six' t Twenty acre to>500 acre farms. Houses and lots, Missouri. For information write to Mr. Bert F. Kaiser, Brun»wick. Mo. Success for you in 1932. Your stars will tell. ZodiacaJ reading 10 cent*. Send birthday. H. W. Buschen, 138 C3ay St., Hackensack, N . J . Wanted Men to solicit uidsn_ipr Fruit and. Ornamental Tre«8, RoBes, ShruArsi—fiyer-preens. Pay we*kly. Free Outfit. Fruit <;rowers Nurseries, Newark. New York State*

A RARE CHANCE You prevent many causes, prevent also

the chief cause of ill health. Involve* no-sacrifice, no inconvenience, no mental meth­od, no advice, no medicine, no treatment, no-effort, no pain, no skill. Cheaper than soap; easy to do; takes few minutes. Book 25 cents. No strings. ' »- ,

DUAPART CO., - H FELLA PLACE, San Francisco, Calif. A good thrifty 40-acre apple orchard in good fruit country; other farm bargains. Breazeale. the land man, Hermitage. Mo. For Sab—5 pr. giant white runt pageoes, $4.50 per pair or $20 for all; some were-winners at last national show; a fine present for that boy. J. B. Basehore. Jeannette, Pa. Send 25 cents for our hand lotion recipe. Molt a at. hnmft^ M V « money. Delights al!. Hickman Co.. TO8 Olive, St. Louis, Mo. Drug Store for Sale—Physician's opportu­nity: only store in county; 15,000; can be greatly reduced; mountain town. Addres? Clements. 2044 Gaylord St., Denver, Col. Ladies' engraved motto for your dining' room $1.00 postpaid. Lewis Young, 19' Greenwood Ave., Wollaston. Mass. $Ib.75 -Mary~Miles Tailored Dresses look se-delightfully extravagant I Excellent fit—work­manship. Direct from manufacturer. Tre­mendous savings! Catalogue free. Mary Miles Frocks, 1410 Broadway, New York, y. Y. Why suffer from neuritis, rheumatism or any nervous affliction- when relief may be had for the asking. Guaranteed harmless. Chas. G^ Clarke. Soo, Mich. -* Popular Song Poems Wanted, for radio and' talking pictures. Thousands of dollars paid. Send poems or write for our 50-50 plan-In d i an a_Son g_ Bjineau^Dep^JK. _SajemJ_Ind. Bird Dogs, 2 Irish setter females past year old $15.00 each. One pointer female whelped May, 1930. Liver and White Tom Doone Brecdin $20. all papers above dogs, untrained. Irish setter bitch 4 years, and 3 pups 2 months old, 2 males, 1 bitch, all pa­pers, $85.00. Stud dogs and bird bitches for sale. Dr^ W. J. HUIB. Kirkaville. Mo. Attto Carbon Removed. Keeps motor dean-No expense. Costs $2. Saves $2 monthly. Agents wanted, write today. Carbon Elimi-nator Co.. 9107 Falcon. Detroit, Mich. 32 Dancing, as 1 teach Is New York studios. Physical exercises^. _ Instructions mailed. Reasonable. Write- for Info. • C Fox. 122?« Park Row Bldg.. New York Ctty. 30

I

, - 3 to 12 uHPaTs por~tf»r -la yoi»r-own> tuck yard, be yottr own—boss; if you really want to work, write Httfb C. Amidon, Elyria, Ohio. 29_ Don't throw away your' dull Gillette or Pre— bak blades. They can be resharpened for 1c each. Mall to F. Karmann. 17» Miller A"+ •' Muskegon. Mtch. 29 GIRVIN/S Hair oeJor restorer for Grey pr faded hair brings back original color or money refunded. Send $0 cents for trial sise. A. Oirvin, $08 N. Fourths Camden. N. J.

/ -

mm*mj^mmrmwr~rmrm'+ mqFmn^r^***y* P W f i l ^ W W ^ ^ T ' -J»l^44»-»,fv>-^ll.,^-J|SJ

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The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesday, February 10, 1932

REGISTRATION NOTICE

- , " " Villag* Election

Monday, March 14th, 1932 To the Qualified Electors of the Vill­age of Pinckney

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Notice is hereby give that in con­formity with the "Michigan Election Law," I, the undersigned Village Clerk, will on any day except Sunday and a legal holiday, the day of regul­a r or special election or primary election, receive for registration the name of any legal voter in said Vill­age not already registered who may Apply To Me Personal ly for such re­gistration. Provided, however, tha i I can receive no names for registration during the time intervening' between the Second Saturday before any re­gular , special, or official pr imary elec­tion and the day of such election.

The last day for General Registra tion does not apply to persons who-vote under the Absent Voter 's Law. (See Registration by Affidavit.) Notice is hereby given that I will be >U Millinery Store

Tuesday, Feb. 23 , 1932 The Twentieth Day Preceding Said

Election { From 8 o'clock a. m. until 8

o'clock p. m., for tho purpose of Re­viewing the Registration and Regist­ering such qualified electors in said Village as Shall Properly Apply therefor-. — — - —

ly the place of his or her residence and that he or she possesses the oth­er qualifications of an elector under the constitution; and that owing to tho sickness or bodily infirmity of himself or some member of his or" her family, or owing to his or her ab­sence from the VILLAGE on public business or his or her own business,, and without intent to avoid or delay his or her registration, he or she was unablo to make application for regis­tration on the last day provided by law for the registering of electors preceding such election or primary election, then the name of such per­son shall be registered, and he or she shall then be permitted to vote at such election. I ! such applicant ,sh.\;! in said matter , wilfully make any-false statement, he or she shall be deemed guity of perjury, and upon conviction, be subject to the pains and penalties thereof.

The provision relative to registra­tion in Townships and cities shall ap­ply-and l>« m-force- as to pegmmtton in Villages. Dated Feb. 2, A. D. 1032

Nellie Gardner Village Clerk

(GETTING BUSINESS GLOOM E M ) US

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In r.ny village in which the clerk doc s not maintain regular daily office hours, the village council of such village may require that the clerk of such village shall be a t his office or o t ' o r designated place for fhe pur-po.--* of receiving applications for re­git (.ration, on such other days as it ahall designate prior to the last day for registration, on such other days as it shall designate prior to last day of registration, not exceeding five days in all.

Notice is hereby further given that I will he at Mjllinery Store

Saturday, February 27, 1932 from 2 o'clock p. m. to 5 o'clock p. m. Saturday, March 5th 1932—Last Day from 10 o'clock a.m. to 9 o'clock p.rn^ For Cieneral Registration by Person -

al Application for Said Election The naffleH)f--fto-pt^ffln--but an AC1V__

T w o D a t e s f o r N e w Y e a *

in S e v e n t e e n t h C e n t u r y We ought to be thiofeful that the

iffeir of the calendar wai Mttled for SB by eur ancestors, for It noat hare been i very muddling bpttneas to live In the Seventeenth century, for in­stance, when the new year, did not BeflB offlcialiy until tBe la i t week In

UAL Resident of the precinct at the t ime of said registration, and entitled under the Constitution, if remaining such resident, to vote at the next _ election, shall be entered in the regis-trat ion book.

Registration by Affidavit S e c 10 Registering of Electors:

Regular Session of 1925 =Arry-ttb*cTrtr " V o t e r r a s defined—in this; net, whose

name is not registered and who shall claim the right to vote by absent vot-erVbnttot" at any_ election or prtmary" electiohTTviay at theTime of m along" application for absent voter's ballot, present to the village clerk an affida­vit for registration which shall be in substantially the following form:

Affidavit for Registration State of Michigan County of

| ss. I being duly sworn, depose and say that 1 am a citizen and duly qualified elector of the „ — :.-. pre-

March, while at the same time peo­ple counted December »1 as the last day of the old year. Long before the •time of Pepys, for example, many peo­ple regarded January 1 as New Tear's day, though the old year went on un­til March 24. Thus on December 31, 1660, Pepyi notes in hln diary: "At the end of the last and the beginning of this year. , . . 1 take myself now to be worth fSOO (about $1,500) clear in money." But this did not al­ter the fact that January 1 was not 1663, but 1660. March 2u he reckons merely aa_7Laiv_day7' thottfh/on_that date he had to change the year.

It Is really remarkable that noth­ing was done until 1752 to bring the end of the year by ordinary reckon­ing and ,the legal end of the yeaf togerher—though, after all, it .may not

~be--so—woniM-fur when we rgmrmteT" that we purselves still begin the fiscal year a* from Qld Lady day, which Is

calendar. Yet

By ROME C STEPHENSON President Amtricau Baaktrt Aitodatio* TpHBRE is such a thing a s brer-stay* ' * ing a depression just as there Is of over-staying a boom. Over-confi«

dence makes tho g r e a t m a j o r i t y miss the turn ia a boom, and un-d e r - c o n f i d e n c a makes them miss it in a depression. A leading New York banker wad aa-ked r e c e n t l y when, l ie could \eH ,1that *. tufri ( for the* better had! i o m e . " A b o u t

R. C. STEPHENSON ' t h r e e montha ; after It nag hap­

pened," he candidly replied. J

-There Is more signTficance Ja tha t remark than appears on the surface* As more and more manufacturers and business men realize that the turn ha* already come and that they are, over* staying the time to adopt constructive policies, they begin cautiously to presa their selling campaigns, to speed up their production, to enlarge their work* Ing forces and increase their cora*» mitments for supplies. It is the gather* ing weight of their influences that finaU ly raises the pressure of coitfldencai to the dynamic power of recovery.

The surest way to b r i n g thp> ^rinti

cinct of the village of in the county of and State of Michigan; that my post-office address is No street

or R. F. D. No P. O ; that I am

there are'compensations even in anom­alies. The sufferings of the ordinary citizen about the turn of the year are •erious enough without bating a bud­get to add to them,—Manchester (England) Guardian. .

out of the business depression ia to raise the pressure of public confidence to the point of becoming such a dynamic force. It has invariably been! the push of that force which haa started recovery in the past, and it is the gathering power of thlc fore* which will start recovery frcm thir-present depression.

It is a favorable sign of tho timet* that there seems to be general agree' meht that the bottom of the depres­sion has been reached and all eyes' are peeled and looking ahead for the> first indications that the turn for th*

\ better - isr in -sight.—Who knows—buJ wbat the first thing we know wo will. find ourselves looking backward in.' stead of. forward as we realize thaf the turn has already come. It Is 3 rough and rocky road that runs across the bottom .of__th.?--va.llex__9f busincsa depression, and most of us Tfrre-too-busy steering the old Ford from hump to bump to be able to take in all tho "scenery. So who knows b u t - w h a t eome important changes in the land* scape are already taking place.

NEIGHBORING NEWS

A '600 lb. hog was butchered at Highland last week.

Because of the sharp decline in the demand for grocery orders, the wel­fare store at Dearborn may be closed. This i nnouncement bears out recent statements t h a t Dearborn 's unem­ployment class had diminished to al­most a negligible minimum during the past few weeks. j

The Oakland County Fair which is1

held al Mjlford each year is said to stand at a critical point. Many un­paid bills and premiums are against the fair assoc. i

Ths Standard Oil Co. has purchas-* ed the property in Brighton at the corner of Grand River and U. S. 23. I t lias been renting the same., for several years of the Ira Cast.' heirs.

Livingston county paid a total gas and weight tax in 1931 of $«)7,-458.1(5.

Charles VanWinkle and Browning Browne are preparing to drill an oil well on the A. L. Smith farm just east of Howell. The Davis Oil Co. of New Lexington, Ohio, will do the work,

Twelve acres of land on the Cedar j Bend Drive near Ann Arbor has been j given to that city by its owner, Mrs. Cora Vaughn, to be used as a park.

Probably - iko—xdd£stau. .omobile driver in tho U n i t o d S t a t e s lives' In Michigan. The Michigan department of state recently issued a driver's lic­ense to Thomas. Gordon of Grand Rapids, aged 102 years.

"Step on I t " a three act play will be given by the Stockbridge Senior class on Feb. 10.

Th.' Stockbridge common council refused to act on a jietition for t ^ repeal of a village ordinance prohib­iting the operation of card rooms in the villager and also refused to push the complaint to close the card room on account of the state statute .gov­erning, same.

The Howell egg and poultry show will be held on Feb. 18, 10, and 20.

FOR THE SMALLEST KITCHENETTE or the LARGEST HOME . . .

there is an

ELECTROCHEF electric range!

No mat ter what t h e size of your k i tchen 'or your family, no mat ter how large or how small vour home or apa r tmen t , t he re s an Electro-chef modeJ designed to lit it. One of t he four models shown he re is exactly adap ted to vour requ i re , menta. For thek i t chene t t e , the re '8 a range comple te with four bu rn , ers and full-size oven, requi r ing floorspa£fionlv22inche& wide a n d 25 inches deep . ( T h e oven will easily roast a 20-pound turkey . ) For ki tchens where space is a less impor tan t considerat ion, there ' s t he s tandard Electrochef. For larger homes, t he re are t he two-oven four-burner and the two-oven sw-burner range. T h e smallest k i tchenet te model is adequate for 2 t o 10 p e o p l e , and t h e large 2-oven models will cook for 20 to 30. Choose EleotFochcf that-

'mm

r

Bo4«*t

YOUR needs! I nvoathly

THE D E T R O I T E D I S O N co.

A study of one thousand families usinaTnSe • tlECTROCHEf electric range showed a Cooking cost of

WE SERVE OR SELL ..IN QUANTITY

BANKERS FAVOR

( ITEMS OF 25 YEARS AGO

Ice Cream

Boxing th* Comga• • To box the compass means. In nnu-

- t l ra l Imigua^p. (u n»clte Tn consecutive" ordnr the points of the mariner's coin-pass. The points, from north to oast are as follows": North, northbne-TfalT

"part, north hy wnftrrrorth hypast one-hnlf east, north north east, north north one-half east, north east hy north, north east one-half north, north east, north enst or one half oaot, north east hy east, north east hy east one-half east, east north east, east north east one-half east, east by north, east onerhalf north, east. *

The Power to ra«i

GRADUAL CHANGE

From the 'Dispatch" of Feb. 14 1907 L c i t b<!£iin Wednesday. Th'- ice houses in this section arc

about all filled. Horn to Nornlan Wilson and wife

of Mifso'uH on Jan. 24. a boy.

N a t i o n a l C o m m i s a i o i L J i e l i f e v e j . L o c a l S e n t i m e n t S h o u l d G o v *

e r n E v o l u t i o n i n M e t h o d s of C o n d u c t i n g B a n k i n g .

A post card from George Reason states that they have sold 40 Carter awv* at t^-€-hfcage---aulo show.

I

L^,L-W-edno&<Uiy t i v e n i t i K l t b ^ B u ^ of th<• Hastem Star went to the home of -Mrs. F. A. Sil ler as a farewell sut'|Ht^'- party"on Mrs-.-<-icnrge Reason who i* -soon- to—move tOLjJLetjrx>|t

eft i

FRUITS, NUTS AND-CONFECTIONARY.

BROOK'S AND HENRY BOX CANDIES

B&nanas, Oranges, Grape Fruit, Apples,Lemons,Etc.

FRUITS IN SEASON

A

CTNTItE F substantial changes aro to b«

brought abuut in branch banking ia the United States they should origi­nate witkiii Uxa states rather than from Washington on iutnr-state linos as proposed in "trade area." brmeh "banking plans, a recent report or V\e Economic Policy Commission o[ l i i a iMi-* Viola iVters Monday with a American Bankers Association de­clares. Such changes, it adds, "should develop by evolutionary rather thaa revolutionary stages."

'Tlie

is a

extension of branch baTTT ing through state action would mean that

not now registered as an elector therein and that I am voting by ab­sent voter's ballot at the election (or pr imary election) to be he3d upon the

": day of 10 , the application for which ballot accompanies this application; that I make this affidavit for the pur­pose of procuring my registration as an elector in accordance with the s t a t u t e ; that I make the following s ta tements in compliance with the Michigan Election Law: Age ; Race 5 Birthplace

Date of naturaliza tion I ' f u r t h e r swear or affirm tha t the answers giv­en to the questions concerning my qualifications as an elector are t rue and correct to the best of my know­ledge and belief.

TakcB. subscribed and sworn to be­fore r,ic thi3 day of

19 My Commission ex­

pires 19 Signed -~ « ••

Notary Public in and for said County, State of Michigan.

Mote If this acknowledgement is taken outside that the person taking the Court that the person taking the acknowledgement is a notary must be attached.

RtgUtration of Ab*«nU» by Oath Sec. 9 _ P a r t I I—Chap. III. If any

person whoae name is not registered *hall offer and claim the r ight to vote a t any election or• pro-mary election, and shall, UNDER r\\ju atAtft £hat he or she J M U l s d -

states not now permitting state banks to have branches or else" closely r o etttctirig them, would individually lib­eralize their laws as_an oxprcssioii o£

"cTfanging local desires anft-tmBditijra, i t.)

beautiful photo holder was renictriberanoe.

(lair Johnson has accepted a posi­tion with thi- Fowlervillo Commercial bank and commenced work Monday.

The W. 1. C. met at the home of full

attendance of 17. A thirty gate social will be held at the hjflme of Perry Towh.. Frb. 22. n-Mt1^- >fam**ft-llr41- 4j»'d at hey-—hem^ Tu*-;i;.y _nij^t. The funeral will be held at the home Friday.

The Ladies Home Missionary met at tlv- home of Mrs. Ella Jackson Inst week and elected the following onV-

That's Dixie Gas

and this doubtless would insure a liberate, evolutionary process," the " :• port says. "Tho other method, tha' > through Federal action, would menr a sweeping change for the country ; 3 a whole, for legislation grunt1, x branch >hanking powers to national banks in all states, regardless of local sentiment, would, ot course, indiro equivalent branch banking enactments in every state in the Union not )i<>w permitting or really wanting state banks to have branches, in order to keep them on a competitive- equality.

Upholds State Privilege* **VTe Unit—strrrre—bas4i4w»-„-w4v«- f^el

Pre PITS.

Vice Sec'y. ' Tresis. Chaplain

LEE LAVEY GOODYEAR TIRES

den t of such precinct and has resid­ed in the VILLAGE TWENTY DAYS nex t preceding such election or pri­m a r y election, designating particular-

Phone 491 Complete Samples Line Prices Reasonable-Work Guaranteed

Howell Upholstering Co. % LARDIE

Furni ture Repairing and Rcfinishing

Work called for and delivered

119 Byron Road Howell, Mich.

DonW. VaaWinkle Attorn*? at Law

that a proper stimulus to tho develop­ment of branch banking would ba given by tho Federal Government tak­ing the initiative through granting broader privileges within state linea

! to national banks than tlity now ea« Joy. It is argued that state govera* menta could then follow suit as to s ta te banks and that in this way a more progressive branch banking al­titude might be promoted by the na­tional banks taking the lead. White we do not deny that there may ba some merit in this view as to soma specific localities, we stand firm never* theless on the principle that no such grant of powers to national "banks should cross state lines, or exceed tlie privileges that s ta te legislatures could and would grant to their s ta te banks,

"Moreover we believe tha t If t h r choice between these two possible courses ot extending branch banking were put up to bankers they would be generally opposed to any forcible imposition of branch banking on the states through the medium of the na­tional _bauk_s ja t t in^_We beliovo it

Mrs. E1 ht-Jackson ... Mrs. Thomas Hurchiol

Mrs. Frank Crimes Mrs. Helen Ter t;h Mrs. J. A. Cadwell

A large wolf was shot near Chelsea last week. Washtenaw county had to pay half of the state bounty of $2">.

Th" Ander.on Fanners Club met with Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wil.-or Feb. 'J. The following officers were elected: Pres K. (',. Webb

STATE OF MICHIGAN I he I'.obatc Court for the County of

Livingston.

,LI ,t .^.-sion of sain iuurl , held at tin I'lobatc Oftice in the City ,»i' Howell in said County on the 7th day of J, ruury A. I). 1992. _ : -lij^^-ai: UtriK—^W-iilia. L. L;*miSr

Judge o& Probate. In the Matter of the Kstale of

Clarence Iv Clenri, Deceased. Louiso C. Clc.nn having filed in said! — court her petition, praying that the

Phone 010 Repair Work of All Kind*

GUS RISSMAN Licensed MasTcr Plumber ....

Plumbing ai^i Heating

We Do Plumbing and Heating nf All

KJLnd^.WiiHandle l iLectr ie- l^aapsj -

Scptic Tanks and Water Pfiflsure Tank3

C04 Washington Howell, Mk\t

Vice Pres. Chas. HofT

(administration of said estate be granted to herself, or to some oth-. ei' suitable person.

It is Ordered, That the fcth day of February A. D. Hi.'l'J at ten o'clock in the forenoon, at said probate of­fice, hi and is hereby appointed £or hearing said petition.

It is Further Ordered, That pub­lic notice thereof be given by publi­cation of a copy of this ordr-r, for three .succcssivf weeks previous to said day of hearing, in the Pinckney

1 I A X E . O F MICHIGAN

-4--

Ofice ot. i

First State Savirgs Btnk

flouts Ml*—

would be preferable-J

Sec'y Asst. Sec'y. Cora Devereaux Trea- Richard Clinton The next meeting will be held March f) with Mr. and Mrs. Charles HofT.

The. North Hamburg Literary Soc­iety wil meet with Mr. and Mrs. S. K, Vanllorn, Feb. 10. The following program has been prepared: Music Club Bulletin Ceorgo VanHorn Recitation Kittic King Kecitatiort > Bertha Rosecran Solo Grace Appleton Paper Lulu Benham Solo . .• , Will Na*h Reading Myron Hendricks Reading .7 ." Orville Nash Recitation- . . . :7. . . . , Max Switzer Solo Howard Harris Recitiation Suda Swarthout Recitation Frank Dunning Solo Fanny Swarthout Monologue Fred Fish

A sawmill is being set up on the

agani>- *aid < -tat,- should be limited, JiliUliitJlh.-Ji-.ni^vspapiT j ) l iMLd^and l and_ tha i . ^ in i i^Lx, 44»poiute4-fce> r e -

Mary Greiner [ circulated in said county.

Willis L. Lyons, A true ropy. Judgr of Probate

Cflfstia Parshall, Register of Probate.

Rad:r> Repairing Ari.l Work

to come about through the more grad­ual and democra'tlo method of tha states g/anting their banks brancH banking_Jtpwers state by state where, if. a a d ^ l l g a l condition! and aeag '

rchftfi**^ -Jama*igaylc i a rm . Bo-ni to Max Cameron and wife of

Plain field, a daughter nnrl to C. Sweet and wife, ;t son.

E. Garnett 1 am equipped to d.o all kinds of

radio repairing and a r id work. Also have a full stock of repairs and parts to replace worn units. Was in radio business h Detroit for seven years. Give me a call, Trices reasonable. PinrUn** Mich. Phon« No. 8

666

The Frobate Court for the County of Livingiton.

At a .*'.-.7>i, ei" ..-.id Court, held at the Probate (HYUT in the City" of How.ll in the .said County, on the 2 day of January, A. 1"). J *j:;2.

Pre ent. Hon. WjlLis L. Lyon?, Judge of Probate.

In<5juyMatt<-.v of th- Fstatc of Emil H. P,\er, f)eceas«'d.

li appealing <»t the court that th* ti '1" ff"' pre.-'-ntation of claims

enve, examine and adjust all claims and dmiands again.st said deceased by and before .-aid court :

It r, Ordered, That creditors are required to p r e s e t their claims to said court at said Probate Office on or before the :>th day of May A. D. K>oJ. at te„ o'clock in the forenoon, said time and place being hereby ap­pointed for the examination and ad-jusi'TVnt, ,;f ail claims and 'demands againM said deci ased.

It is Further Ordered, That public notice then -of be K i vm by publication of a copy of this order for three sue-crssivr weeks previous to said day of hrari?,g in the Pinckney Dispatch, a nrwspapor printed and circulated in

,said county,

Willie L. Lyons, A true copy: j u d g c 0 f r r o b a t c .

Celestia Parshall, Register of r r o b a t c .

6o<; Liquid or Tablets uaed intern-lly and 6*56 Salve externally, make a

- comprrtc -and TrfTccttve tfeaTmcnT~for Cold.^.

$5,000 in Cath Prizes Ask Your Druggist for Particulai*

XI

JmttM of Oi I S M 'is-

1 afV- •

'«s - ;.;•:«*.

w^^mrf^rrwymrn'mm P^ l fl

Howell H. C Gcrkin, Mgr. Howell, Mich.

>ifcj ..

* ..

;,* '

V

r

m

2 J ITI

^ - , I^H

Wed., Thur., F; Feb. 10, 11, 12 A Sensation "LADIL3 OF THE BIG HOUSE"

Feat. .SYLVIA SIDNEY SLIM SUMMERVILLE in a timely comedy

"PEKING INTO PEKING" News Novelty Sat., Feb. 13

"LASCA OF THE RIO GRANDE" Feat. LEO CARILLO and DOROTHY BURGESS

"Galloping Ghost No. 10 Comedy Cartoon Mat. 2:00 P. M. con. to 11 PJM.

•x<

Sun., Mon., Feb. 14, 15 "BELOVED BATCHELOR"

Feat. DOROTHY JORDAN and PAUL LUCAS Comedy "Running Wild" W^ek End Mystery

Snakeg-Attrer Mat. 2:00 P. M. con. to 11:00 P. M.

»X'

Tues., Feb. 16 WALTER HUSTON in

RUTH CHATTERT6N in "RULING VOICE"

"RIGHT TO LOVE" 'X<

Wed., Thur. Fri. Feb. 17, 18/19 EDDIE CANTOR in "PALMY DAYS"

His Greatest Success Comedy "Sold at Auction" "The Handy, Guy" News

x Earning Isn't Enough

Mr. and tori. J. M. Brigham, daughter, Zeta, and children spent last Wednesday in Dearborn, the guests of Mr. and Mrs. frhos. Moahier.

Loreen McGIejinen of Detroit via-ited at the J. M. Brigharo home Sun-day.

Roy Smollett made a business trip to Detroit last Thursday.

Edna Kingsley returned Sunday after spending a week in Dearborn and Inkster.

Mr. and Mrs. C. Kingsley enter­tained Mr. and Mrs. Willard Bennett

ehiidren-of Jackson Sunday. Mr. and % Mrs. M. Allison spent

Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Will Mer-

Jasper Bennett, a life long resident of Hamburg died at the county home I in Marion township, Wednesday night, February 3. He waa the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeese Bennett arfd was born in Hamburg about 84 years ago. October 17, 1875 he w*a united in marriage with Mass Augusta Riech-hoff, who die,d three and a half years ago.,He is 6urviy$d by one brother, L. C. Bennett of Webster and alnam-ber of nephews and niecek; Funeral services were held at the Free.$etho-dist church in Hamburg village Sat- { urday afternoon, Rev. Ralph'Sterling j officiating. Burial was in Hamburg'

at a pleasant meeting of the Ladies Guild of St .Stephen's Episcopal

cer of Pinckney* f e e e r y ' Master Buddie Smollett entertained M r s \ H c n r y B- P r y c r w ^ # o « t c s s

a company of his young friends Mon­day afternoon, the occasion being his \ , , A , L - ^ - - . sixth birthday. Ice cream and c a k e f c h u i d l a t h u r h o m c T * " " * ^ a f t e ^ were served and a good time was had / n o o n ' T h e P r c s ident, Mrs. James W.

Featherly was in charge of the meet-< ing. Officers reports were given by

Mrs. Frank Buckalew and Mrs. Charl­es S. DeWolfe and other regular

by all. Miss Marjorie Allison spent Sun­

day at the homc of Clayton Musson. of Howell.

PLAINFIELD

Most of us like to work, for work en­

ables us to satisfy our Jiope* and ambit­

ions. It produces the money with

which we can purchase the things we

woifwant and need.

-^-But working and earning isn't enough—saving must be a part of our program if we are really to#succeed and gnjoy^he-faHts-of our work in old age,

Work hard and intelligently^aye a

portion of your earnings withregul ity; enjoy life as you go along and your

familyisassured. --7--6 i \

Rev. H. V. Clark will begin special meetings next Sunday evening at the Plainficld church. Rev. Clyde Van Patten the singing evangelist will as­sist.

Jack Donohue who is attending col­lege at Ypsilanti was home for the week end.

Mr. and Mrs. B.W. Roberts of Lan­sing were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Dutton.

Dr. and Mrs. F. E. Gauss were call, ers at Mr. and Mrs. Dan Lantise's of Stockbridge Saturday.

Miss Marjorie VanSyckel spent the hist-pa-rt of"tmr-week, with Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Gardner. ~

Mrs. Crofoot of Howell is spending a few days: with Mrs. S. -G-. Tapping and is sick with laryngitis.

Mrs. Waldo Watters spent .several days last week with her mother, Mrs. Frank Haines near Pinckney.

Mrs. Arleta Palen of Detroit was home with her parent?. Mr. anil Mr?. H. A. Wasson, Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Vance Miller are BotTi onTthe hick list.

Mis. Letta Chiircn-spent the week end with her son and family near Webbcrville.

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Dyer wore Sun-day guests of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Dyer, north of Fowlcrville.

The callers last week at Mr. and -Mrs.Orla Jacobs were Mr. Stephen

UuyliiL'sis traiwUcteU."Financ church and other church problems were discussed. Work was done on quilt blocks, and a pleasant > social

for one week only beginning

Wed. Feb. 10 to Feb. 17 A $4.00 Duradene, LcMur 6r Shelton Permanent

Wave Complete with Ringlet Ends for

$2.50 After February 17 the price will be $4.00 and the

Eugene $5.00

Dot's Beauty Shop SUiiiniiiiiiuiimnniiNiiiiiiiittuiiiiniiiiiifiiiMiiiiiiiiiituuiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiitiiiiiniis

enjoyed. The jtfxt meeting will be held at the home of Mrs. Charles S. DeWolfe.

Hamburg Hive, No. 392, Lady Maccabees met in regular Bession in I. O. O. F. hall, Tuesday afternoon, with Lieutenant Commander^ Mrs. Blanch B. Prycr, presiding. Mrs. Kit-tie Gilbert was installed as sergeant. The following officers and committees were anointed: color bearers, Mn-*. Myrtle Winkelhaus, Mrs. Gladys Lea, Mrs. Myrtie^Smith, Mrs. Helen Queal and Mrs. Ethel Parkinson; banner bearers, Mrs. Mary Dyer, Mrs. Car­rie Wilson and Mrs. Delia FieW; aud-1ting'TbnimItte^7^^s7_FIb~rence"Ki3by7 Mrs. Mildred Whitlock and Mrs'.' Ida Knapp; assistance?--Miss Jule Adelc. 5 — 1 £ - \ ^ Ball and Mrs. Emma Hayher; enter-tainment, Mrs. Nellie E. Haight, Mrs. Dora Dilliway and Mrs. Mary Dun­ning. For good of the order Mrs. Nel lie E. Haight, Mrs. Blanche B. Pry-er and Mrs. Myrtie Smith conducted a number of games of po-ke-no, first prize being won by Mrs_._Elsie Gray,

We try at all times to supply your needs with every- §

thing wanted in the hardware line in Stoves, Paint, |

M- Phimbing-Supplies, JMlders-Bardware, Toals-«tc. X

nt we can get it for § 8 £ § you, |

second prize by Mrs. Ella Mob~fl~tm~a Tie witn Mrs. iviinnic JTuc^alew, Mrs. Liona R. Olsaver and Mrs. Jennie Shannon. — —Mias Grace

| We recommejid-BlatchfordV Fill the- the-Basket*-

Kcebe and Miss Helen

Pinckney State Bank We Pay 3 Per Cent on Savings

Baker of Saline, Mr. and Mrs. Fred

I Rose, Miss Mildred Secor. , Duane Jacobs, Clyde Jacobs and

t Mr. Lawrence Peterson attended the , Farmois week Thursday at East Lan j J sing.

Fe r2js C a&k ey __andMargaretJfcck-

Wenderlcin, teachers in Hamburg vil-lage school and Mrs. Earl C. Lear and daughter, Arlone, spent Monday evening at—Miss—J-u4e-Adeie Ball'

Mrs. W. H. Meyer and son, Eds«J 1,' were in Howell Saturday.

Mrs. Fred Carpenter of Pontine and Chas. Eddy of Fowlerville we re

"TfinnerguesTs""of Mr. and M;i\s. Claude Reason one day tast weekT

Mrs. Jessie Brown, Mrs. LVe lie Smith and John DunVar spent .'Sun­day with Mr. and Mrn. Will Dunbar in Jackson.

Willis Caulk and wife of L/ctn >it Kpent the week end with Mrs. . Eliza Gardner.

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Harris of Howel! were Sunday callers at the home of Mr. and Mi>. L. G. Dei

aux. Mr. ami Mrs. Fred Read and fam­

ily spent Sunday in Jackson with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Peters.

Mi>. Boone Amburgey is spending the week with Mr.' and Mrs. Herbert Allan in Jackson.

Joe Crane of Ar.n Arbor spent several days last wt ek whh Russell Read.

sey called Thursday night on Mrs. A. L. Dutton to work on refreshment committee for a social in the near futuiv for the M. C. S. S. class.

Phillis and Joyce Kensey spent T-«*5thry_ aitormjon~-with Mrs. E. N^ Braley.

Plana were discussed and fort^j^ate^ for a George Washington Bicenten­nial celebration with a tcnative date set as April 15.

Harold Gilbert has returned home from a ten days stay at Ford Hospi­tal,—Dt^«e4t^,Xei_o^scTy^tioni__^^^_

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Way and daughter, Barbara Dell, have return­ed to their home at Piatt after spend­ing the past three months with Mrs. Way's brother-in-law and sister, Dr.

^ n d Mrs AW H Pearson, Mr_-Way_U|

LAKELAND NEWS

Specials Coffee. H. & H. fioma brand, lb 19c Carleton Pastry Flour Crackers, 2 lbs. Red Salmon Gold Medal Flour Raisins, 2 lb. bag Mustard, q t j a r

Mea t* at All Times

r Clark We deliv« r goodt at all timet

48c 19c 23c 79c 20c 20c

Mrs C. A. Brown spent ,the week end with Mi\ Bi*own at Durand.

Jack Ingsbey of Detroit spent Sun­day with his mother, Mrs. Thomas Furgu^on at Strawberry Lake.

Frank Potts who ha»s been a guest of his father, John Potts, has return­ed to his home in Chattanooga, Tcnn.

Mr. and Miv. Dallas Cox of Pinck--m^y-wrtv Fr+tlay evening guests- of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jack.

Nelson and Nelian Navarre of Ann Arbor ai*e staying with their grand­mother, Mrs. Melly Whitlock, and at­tending Winans Lake school.

Miss Gladys Richards of Jackson was a week end guest of her parents,

}Mr. and Mrs. Harry Richards. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lee and son,

Alger, of this place and Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Carr and Billy Meyer of Pinck­ney attended the Boy Scout Court of Honor held at Howell Monday even­ing. Alger received four merit badge- and wan also made a life scout and Billy was made second class scout. m

M's. Thomas Furgeraon of Straw­berry Lake upent Monday with Mrs. Ed Bauer at Farmington.

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Imut, Jr. and daughter, Joan, and Miss Marie Pat* rick of Strawberry Lake attended a birthday dinner at the heme of Mrj».

— JJOua-VanKTrren-^it Howell in h<nior of Mrs. VanKnren's birthday.

Bruce Euler and Lowell Horning spent Thursday in Toledo.

Mrs. Lawrence Imuq who has been visiting in Detroit has returned to herhom« at Mttrawbejrry Lj£f<

i has employment in Detroit, j Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Navarre

who have been living at Campbell-town have purchased the residence of Mr. and Mrs, Wiliam E. Pilgrim on South Broadway, and with their five children have taken possession,

Mrs. William Winkelhaus is at Melius Hospital in Brighton recover­ing from an operation.

Mrs. Edwin Shannon, Sr. has re­turned home from U. of M.hospital Tn Ann Arbor where she spent nearly K weeks taking treatments.

Mrsl Elizabeth DeWolfe who is spending the winter with her daught­er, Mrs. Ruel J. Conway and fam* in Ann Arbor spent a few day's last week with her son, James DeWolfe, and family and attended the naeeting of the Ladies* Guild.

I We handle Farming Tools and Repairs.

i

Mash and Full of Pep Scratch Feed. s *

e e pie IFIa r dvva r eT ••lllttlllllllliHlllHIlltlllUIUItlllllllllllllllllflllllllllilllllUlllfllllillliiiiiiitiiifiim,^

•T7»i

ffUliuiiiUiiiniiiliirf: :3iMHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiinimm...imn|.MIHnmmi,mmm

I EQUIP WITH THE BEST r

Gum-Dipped Tires

i s

GREGORY

Mr. and Mrs. John Grosshans, M Vet Bullis and Miss Effie Reason spent Thursday in Lansing.

Fred Marshall of Mason was in town calling on old friends Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. Cleve Poole and Mfes. B*rnice Harris attended the 1+J/&S. dinner at 01 in Marshall's Weutaday.

The L. A. S. of the Baptferchureh will hold a social at the CojpjBiinity hall Friday evening, Feb. 19th| Sup­per from seven o'clock until*""sll are served. "A -, *

Mrs. Wak«* Bajjer of Detr^iWvettt part of last'week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elda Kuhn. «1 •*'

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tweodly^ of Royal Oak and Mrs. Allen Wylic HH) Wm. Rothwell of Detroit w^re^-we^k ead giiistoLM Kcy_. LT5T

You want the utmost safety—comfort—economy, Firestone Full-Size Gum Dipped Balloons fill these requirements.

Firestone Balloons are logically possessed of S greater strength, flexibility and endurance—they are § the onfy Gum-Dipped low pressure tires. H~ -Come in; let us demonstrate how Gum-Dipping f

makes possible the superiority of these wonderful tires,

Firestone are economical through surpassing mile­age and service.

Slayton & Son CHEVROLET SALES A SERVICE QLDS

iNNwmiiimn nwiiniNiiiiiiiniiiiiiiutiiituiuiiniMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiHiiiiiiiiiini

^7^1 The fiackflty Difpateh $125per yr.

*ww*w* JIPWT

,/ A < * % * . ' • . < ,

» m^mm+mmmmm—m—mmm mmmmm PP mmw

, '< j &>^ V i s

1W PWckney DisjMtdt Wednesday, February 10,1932

T< SAVERS tX

Guest Ivory, 6 bars Black Pepper, lb. pkg Teapot Tea Sugar, 10 lbs. Polar Bear Flour Oxydol, large pkg. Vanilla 12 oz. bottle com CoTF , real good, lb.

t

eanut Butter. 2 lb. iar Catsup, large 14 oz bottle» 2 for Pink Salmon #^*--^aM^aW^a^aW^^a^a«^«^aB»«»a^BaMa^a«a«a*il«awaia«a™a»*W.r-

Dill Pickles, qt jar Chocolates, lb

2 i f

Palmolive Soap, 3 cakes Soap, Flake White or P. G„ 3 bars Pancake Flour 5 lb sack

Mr. a d Mrs. Chas. Campbell had as Sund.iy guest* Mr. and Mrs. Aihe: Seim and family and Frank Coll{u* of Chilaon.

Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Grave? a^J y wart in Howell Saturday.

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Graves were the Misses Nyra Graves and Dorothy Dorrell of Jack­son.

Mr. and Mrs, George Reason of Detroit were. Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. HoiBttn Season.

Mrs. Margaret Barker of Haslett spent the week end with Miss Dorothy j Carr. " *

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ray Wheeler of Webster a t the Pinckney Sanitar­ium on Jan . 81 , a daughter .

Lynn Hendee attended the Farm­er 's Week a t the Mich. State College last week where some of the Hendee sheep were on exhibition.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Henry of Battle Creek were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Cox.

W. E. Darrow, Mr*. Flora Darrow and daughter, Dorothy visited Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen a t Lansing Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Whalcn were in Windsor, Ont., one day last week. ~~~n*~m^

Mrs. Russell Livcrmore -ri—T * ftMIH^ri",HmnWmiliHmtllWMmHttWlWmWH an operation for appendicitis a t the, Pinckney Sanitarium last Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. J ames Greene of Lansing were Sunday gucsta of her mother, Mrs. Sarah_Carr.

15« 10c

Salted Peanuts, lb Rice, 6 Ibr Cracker«, sodas, 2 lbs

i0c 25c 21c

Creamery .-Butter, lb 25c

C. H. K & N N G D Y WE DELIVER ANY PLACE, ANY JJME

Dr. and Mrs. Hollis S i g l e r o * H o w ell spent Sunday a t the home of Br. and Mrs. C. L. Sigler.

Quite a number from here attend­ed the. oyster supper and play given by St. Mary's Altar Society at Gre­gory last Friday night.

Geo. K. Marshall, 2f>, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Marshall of Lodi township was instantly killed at 11,05 Saturday night when his car hit ft truck on the Ecorse road a mile south of the Wayne road. His fiance, Miss Iris Milner, 22, of Wayne .was also killed. Marshall was born in Dexter township and lived there a number of years with his parent?.

While en route to Dixboro last Fri­day evening the car in Which Mr. and Mrs. Milton Portcojis _of_ this.J>lace were in hit a pile of snow and tipped over. Mr, Porteous suffered a broken arm arid"Mrs. Porteous injuries to her side.

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mercer were Dr. and Mrs. Walt­er Mover of Webbeir i l lc , Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm McGregor of Perry and

a l i i i E H i i i i i

Mr. and" Mrs." Mark All ison and fam-j ily of Chubbs Corners. ]_ MisjL_Francis -Bultts-was one of 70 I in a class of ninty-fivc membersr o f

a ;.•, i3 M * '-S .< £ » - * * « ir* * « • • i r i E t t t f c E . . . :(The Pinckney Dispatch » *_ . , . . . ,. ._ : »

• 1

9 ft ft

-4-

Entcrcd at -^e~f*ost¥"fficc~ at Pinckney, Alien ,as Second Class Matter.

Subscription $1.25 a yeaj in Advance.

All Kinds A l l S i z e s • I PAUL CURLETT PUBLISHER

the U. of M. Training school for nurs . es who was promoted from the Fresh­m a n UMJ^Se^hr r ro rcnc t e s^^ Cap­ping excroiiie wan held Monday even-ing.

Prosecuting Attorney John Wend­ell P>ird and Albert Loom it, of Lan

A Large Supply of Comics Ru^ .

"SRegular Meals and Short Orders Special Rates for School Children

Magazines, Perodicals, Ice Cream, Candy, Tobacco

Ltvermnre and W. ('.'. M;ll-J i er w e n in Detroit on business Tues-

S J •'»»•• -Mm ,;y and ttel'ald KeItm^dy-^u^. •

1 I ft •

SFinckney Fountain Lunch • "* ' (NextTo Bank) • 5 CHARLES WHALLN. Pr<>r». 1

iii Jir k -o'i .Saturday. QiA - few pike are being tak'ii

from the pond and lakes during the recen: freeze. Don Swarthout and Charley Haines are spending- a week

•a1r~t*oTtage'"talre—fl^jMflff

sing wore Pinckney visitors Monday and paid the Dispatch office a call. Mr. Bird is a candidate for the con­gressional nomination in this district and expects to make an extensive campaign.

According to the Fowlerville He-•uk•w...th<.;—persons—who ^got inthe

« • • « • • « « • • £ • 1

Mr. and Mrs. L. W. . l e n d e r an<!

family* were Sunday victors a: the

home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Buries--.

Lee Lavcy visited S t ew C'Uri n a t Mercy Ho nital, Jackson s v . rai times last wee':.

Mi's. Tuffs and T. J. Eagen of Dexter and XV.rl .Huddk-st'Tn oi_Pj :1_ troit were Saturday evening call r> a t the homo of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Kennedy.

Jan-rs Doyle who has been staying with his daughter, Mrs. J. L. Dono-hue, u h i k her husband was in the <lay guests of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Dill

wrong car at Fowlerville recently by mistake were Charles and Arthur Iiullis and a Mr. Arnold. This was caused by the similarity of the two cars. They both were Fords of the, .KMme. year and desigft.

Mrs. Geo. Gibson, Mr. and Mra. Roy Holt of Fowlerville were Sun-

hospital lias Donohue is much quite weak.

Poi-n to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wal-Mr. and Mrs. Don Martin of i a c e t n Friday, Feb. 5, a son.

• :> '-ville, Mr. and Mis. J. C. Has-. ciu>. Kenn.-dy of Detroit with Mrs. Anna Kenned'

•« • • • • • • * •« *« • ( * fi

!

CASH SPECIALSJ

?,Ir. and Mrs. Wm. Brown had as

Sum!: y guests, Mrs. Maiy Wain-

vrlght .

. Mr. and Mis. J. C. Ha.-

ml children of Howell, Stacy Satun

wife of Plainfield, Mr. Mr. A. Pepper, Mr. and Mrs. tuinerj and Mrs

Alb rt GuntluM- and son, (ieorgo of ~A"mfT\\rbbrr"' '

Mai'jorie Sigier is recovering from an allack of appendicitis.

returned home. Mr. i inghain. Mrs. Gibson remained for a f better but still | WCf 'k ' 's v»sit.

I Mrs. Cynthia Wellman returned to her home in Marion la.-it Sunday fol­lowing a three months stay with How-el! relatives. Her many friends will

spent! j ) 0 pioa>serj to hear that she is recove­ring nicely from her lonjr illness.

Mrs. W. H. Hukr t-nt-r-j M r . a n d Mrs. John Meyer and Mr. and Mrs. Ore! Morgan of, <„ns of Ypsilanti spent last Wednca-

For This Waek 3 CANS OF PORK AND BEANS 20c

i i 8

1

;mi

Brig-lion ai a ('» o'clock dinner Sat-u"rda\-~th honor of thctr~20Tn "WT7tdtng

I

I-

nnnivevsary Dr. and Mi's. Clare Skinner

j daughter, Derhua, of Detroit wen T~'~~m} ! Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Er­

nest Frost.

dav with Mr. and Mrs. John Martin. "MisYEeta Harris of J)otroit was a

j Sunday guest of Mr. and Mrs. Tore a n t l I Shchan.

Walter Clark and wife w e r e * i n Howell Saturday evening.

Mrs. W. C. Hendee and daughter, Mrs Villa Richards is spending the jMarjoric spent Sunday afternoon [

week end with Mr. and Mrs. R. H.! w j th Mrs. Jennie Nash in 'Nor th Ham

I I

3 CANS OF MILK 26c 1 CAN OF NO. 2 PINEAPPLE 15c

2 CANS OF PINK SALMON 25c SURE POP POP CORN, 3 p&tft 21c

3 PKGS. SAL SODA ...; 19c

ALL CHILDREN'S AND MISSES SHOES @ COST g

SPECIAL PRICES ON BOY'S RUBBERS

CALL AND SEE

THE BEST COFFEE GROWN 36c

BEST SANTOS COFFEE 26c

ALL BLANKETS @ COST

" • * !

Weekly Trips MadeHe Detroit

Tecple in Brighton. Mr. and Mrs. John Roberts and

family of Gregory were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. H, Jleye?;::

Louis Coyle and wife attende"(T the farewell reception given Rev. Coyle in Albion Thursday evening.

Mrs. Chas. Eddy of Fowlerville is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Reason.

burjr. Gerald Keanedy was in Ann Arbor

last Wednesday. Mrs. Walter Glover of Fowlerville

were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. N\ Pacey.

Mr. and Mrs. C. J, Clinton spent Kst Wednesday with Mr. and Mrs*. \, Olin Fishbeck in Lansing.

Miss Marguerite Harris of Howell

W. W. Barnard i

Re>-. Lewis Dion was in Dttroi th* was the week end guest of the Miss­es Betty and Helen Devcraux.

Mr. and Mrs. M. Martin, th*ir son, Hobby and Charles Dyer of Lansing visited at the home of Mr. and Mr*» Irvin Kennedy Sunday.

Mr%_fjUch Newman of Ann Arbor spent the week end with Mr. and Mrs. Ben White.

LaRuc Koran and wife of Detroit .Spent the weeJ: end with Mr. and Mrh. Fred Teeple.

first Jof the We ' . . M', and ?»T.i\s. Fred Lake had .is

Sund- y gucs'-s. Mr. and Mrs; J D. AmAton of Bii ;hton.

Mr. and Mrs. Gene DjnkeJ vi.ited Mr. and Mrs. Jas Allison near Fow-lervilk Sunday,

Mi-s. Mike Lavcy is visiting re'.ativ-cs at Whitmore Lake.

Thi \ people arc warned to beware of a gang of men who at'i** going

fetH.F.*C LSIOA PINCKNEY

Oftat IcflW l j f f 1» I'M V. *

r i a r o j y i d selling memberships in a tax- irvin Kennedy, spent several days

Mr. and Mrs. L. Dcttling and fam­

ily of Ann Arbor were Sunday guest*

of Mr. and Mrs. Fnufc Battle.

Mlv? Betty Clinton spent Friday

night and Saturday with |fis« Peggy

r«di.rtrtm-k-ague at $1.00 • ti member, last*week Ui Detroit vn busincs* M ***&*** in-Ofviory, p+- ^

WANTED! POULTRY A EGGS W t l pa* e a a a _ f»r.

t g f i daMrarad.... a t _ « 7

f k s i Md wf f l_ a«y an L\* a f ^ t d i d a B

1

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I

V.- ' 4^

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J.J-.

t

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ASTRONOMY HOLDS INVERSE LIMITED

How large is the universe we live in ; can it be measured or is it infinite in extent? Modern astronomy be­lieves it is finite and can be estimated as to size, in spite of the fact that all the parts of the system are running away from one another and expand­ing the universe at a very rapid rate. Reasoning combining ideal mathemat­ical conclusions with the observed facts of astronomy make logical this belief, Willem De Sitter, world fa­mous astronomer, director of the Na­tional Observatory at Leyden, Hol­land, told a University of Michigan audience.

Abstract mathematical formulas about the extent of the universe, be­cause they are ideal simplifications of reel conditions, can never solve the problem alone, said D. De Sitter. Neither can our astronomical obser­vations alone be depended upon, be­cause they are limited at bast.

By the year 1917, be said, two purely mathematical, calculations of the extent of the universe were in ex­istence, one of which dealt with a universe in which there was matter but no motion, the other with motion and not matter. Observations have shown that, while the matter of the universe is tremendously scattered, being far emptigrthan the best man

vacuum, sSITTL Is by no menus absolutely emptjft like the one ideal mathematical universe. On the other hand motion is known in the real uni­verse, 30 that while the real universe had elements of both ideal systems, it resembles neither exactly.

Taking the stand that our part of the whole universe, which we know by telescopic study, is probably no different than other parts, we can use the data of star and nebular density and^peed of motion known to us in mathematical calculations applying to the whole system, D. De Sitter de­clared. , ~_1 ,-....:1.

On this basis it is estimated that the universe is a huge ball, originally with a radius oT 1,000 billion" light years, and now perhaps twenty times this size. One- light year is the distance light travels in nr\a year, nr apfH'ft** maitely five and two-thirds quadrillion miles. In measuring the bulk of the universe a cube one light year on a side is used, and the number of these units in the system is estimated to be about 10 raised to the seventy-ninth power, of 10 with 79 zeros after it. Most interesting of all is the observa­tion that tho spiral nebulae, of which

Dance Frocks in Vivid ColoH • • - t

Hot Breads for Break* fast8 on Chilly Mornings

By Judith Wilaon Sieamlng cereals and delicious hpt

breads are needed on chilly mornings to start the day properly. Some die* experts object to the use of hot breads but I'm all in favor of them as long as they are not served three times a day for ever and ever. Can you think of anything more inspiring than a heaping plate of smoking hot griddle cakes, plenty of butter and a pitcher of maple syrup—or honey?

Here are some recipes—healthful ones, too, in my opinion.

For the graham griddle cakes, mix one cup graham flour, one-half CUP white flour, one tablespoon sugar and one-half teaspoon salt. Dissolve one teaspoon soda in two cups of sour milk. Mix all together into a thin bat­ter. Fry on a hot griddle and serve with plenty of nutteT and cyrup. It's ft safe guess that your men folks will be delighted.

You may wish to doubts the recipe for brain muffins and serve those that are left over for luncheon or for the children's lunch basket. Mix together one cup bran, one-half cup graham flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one-fourth cup sugar and one-half teaspoon salt. Beat two eggs, add one cup milk and two tablespoons melted shortening. Combine the dry and liquid mixtures and lastly add one-half cup seedless raisins, finely chopped raw prunes_or chopped dates dredged

little

S i

You and Your Child By JANE HERBERT GO WARD

m a

Quick Temper, a Horn* Product Whenever I see an adult venting

I his anger upon some inanimate object, I cannot help but wonder how he got that way.

'Way back in his childhood, no doubt, a well meaning mother ap­pealed to his ego and sense of power by way of diverting his attention from a physical pain. Perhaps he fell down, and mother promptly picked him up,

(stooped over and struck the spot j^where he had fallen, as though the

floor, and not he, had been to blame for the mishap.

Then there must have been other times when a knife.was hurled across the floor by mother to make up for the hurt which it had inflicted. That this was due to the lad^own carelessness, did not matter.

Now when the refrigerator ceases to function and friend wife asks him to look it over, he, most likely, vents his anger on the machine. He has no patience with mechanical contrivances that do not function, or any "thing" whatever which may be in his way at the moment. The wonder of it is, that he does not throw dishes about or kick the mahogany. And all this he owes to his fond mother, who, to save him pain, used the wrong tactics.

Self-control is built in. The child

wijl be too late, have been trained fully when some-screw driver,

His emotions will to flair up venge-

, "thing," hook or goes wrong. That he

&

There is shown a deep vivid green crepe silk dress, with brown hat and accesories. The simple crepe frock next is developed in rose, with ivory white yokes at wrist and neck.

The youthful dance frock of white mousseline adds ruffles with im­pressed pleats at the armholes in contrast with the severe bias fold that marks the decollete. The dress at-right, of lacquer red heavy sheer crepe, is com­pleted by a little cape looped at back, and caught at the neckline. -

our own system, the Milky Way, is typical, are all rushing away from one anothej%_JSO_jfchaJt the universe, while

- f a f e J f l l rflTHrtantlyrTniT^BiBg-in^pa€6-^ita4€&^ w e h a v e d o n e ? occupied.

Fremont Couple Are ied-fo Married Tor fig Tears

Mr. ahd Mrs. Charles A. Pear.-on celebrated their sixty-ninth wedding

"ainrivergary at Fremont recently. • He will be 9i\years old on March 9 and

By IRENE VAIL The ingenuity the Pullman Com­

pany . d i s p l a ' y s i° thinking up new names for their cars fades into insignificance compared to the positive genius shown in the selection of new names for old cbbrs.—Cunsidering-the rainbow and its color limitations, don't you think we have done remark. .ably well—to -spin out- these seven-H

Mrs. Pearsoft^eerebrates her ninetieth birthday Feb. 5. Both were born in Ontario and came to Fremont in 1878

Married in Ontario, the couple came to Whitehall in 1871, turned to Bellhaven, Ont.

must aUQ__be_admitted tha t there are some new color blends as well as names'.' * !. .

All sorts of changes are rung on -the—blues; • which—continue to he starred for the current season, espe­cially bright blues—banner being one of. the newer names—which are worn under darft coats.

< One o,f, the most appealing new but re-1 names for.tlfe omnipresent navy and shortly, darker blues is boVn blue. You could

the yellow greens have iC among the high or pale shades; absinthe and chartreuse are among these tones, lovebird green another. The Patou greens are proving their worth in northern as well as their southern worth: this particular range has ehic to offset any tendency to be trying.

Tiffin beige is almost pink and is one~of those dainty tones women like , ioiUife?»-great--moHwiitjg,r a T n T ^ c i e r 4 ^ 0 v o r o Q n d

Each s l a j w r o n f i p w enUrely nfrw M -n . o f . . implication, is color crop, or, rather a new set of a g g o f t M a s u m m e r s k geasprayitol'

- n»™^ Jto_calL^olQr3 ^ a l t h o u g h 4 ^ n ^ n t r r d 5 S i p t i v ^ I5d wouldn^t you know that barcarolle was a varia-tion of Spanish tile, which, by the way, has been one of the really big colors of the season.

- - 0 • • — - -

Alumna of Olivet Establishes Fund

Bake in greased muffin tins in a hot oven for about twenty minutes. Let me remind you that the muffins are delicious" hot or cold.

Corn meal muffins are a favorite breakfast bread in my family. Mix together two cups whole grain corn meal, four teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt and one table­spoon sugar. Mix with one cup milk, two lightly beaten eggs and four tablespoons melted butter. Southern cooks usually use sour milk and soda instead of sweet milk and baking pow­der. If you wish to do so the correct proportion would be one-half teaspoon soda to one cup sour milk.

Bake in small well-greased muffin pans in a hot oven for about twenty minutes. We like these muffins split and filled with butter, then eaten with a hpiiy plum Jain or apple butler.

Boston brown bread with honey is another breakfast suggestion. To make the bread, mix one cup corn meal, one cup rye flour, one cup gra­ham flour, one teaspoon salt and one and one-half teaspoons soda. Mix three-fourths cup black molasses and two cups very sour milk and add to dry ingredients. - Lagtly add one cup

wno is incited, for no matter what reason, to easy anger, will develop into an adult who will react the same.

Patience is a home taught virtue. The child who stumbles, must be taught to look where, he is going, or else the consequences. If he is led to believe that it is not his fault but the stairs' or the- carpet's, instead of being inspired to correct his ways, he right­fully shows his displeasure when he gives either step or carpet a good sound kick. "Rightfully" because ac­cording to his own impression and mother's promptings, he has a just

-cause, — _ _ — -That mother is humoring him he

does not know. And when he grows old enough to detect such subtleties, it

may laugh at his reaction five minutes later does not matter. The habit is there and he is slave to it.

Parents often deplore the fact that young children cannot differentiate between make believe and untruth. They hope their children won't develop the habit of lying. No child deliber­ately tells a lie, unless his environ­ment makes it necessary for him to deceive. Spanking does not prevent its recurrence. The cause—that which elicits such a response must be re­moved. Often the parents do not have to ge far to find it, as it is with-

Mn himself- -and—a-- certain attitude of mind toward spending money, playing with a particular boy, or how long he can stay out after dark.

If we were only as critical of our­selves as we are wont to be at times of our children, they doubtless would be perfect examples of good behavior, as we would have been supplying them with good examples to follow out in their own behavior.

How true it is, only an honest par­ent knows—that we practice any man­ner of questionable means to bring

ing child is nerve racking. We lose sight of our goal, which, is to train him to be .independent and truthful, as we proceed to quiet him by means of ruse.

It is an untruth and as great a fal­lacy from a standpoint of child train­ing to tell a youngster that inanimate objects have power to hurt one, as to tell him that danger lurks in the dark. In either case an attitude is being built built-in toward an element which will repeat itself throughout his life. Repetition is what makes a habit firm. Constant repetition likewise causes a given response to became automatic— second nature to the person practicing it and a definite characteristic of his make-up.

YourHandwriting— and What It Tells By JANET WINTON

raisins dredged with a little white flour. Fill small well-greased molds .wcHthlfds 'full, cover-wjth greased

steam—for three' ho»raw Reheat in steamer or oven before serving.

Graham Maple Syrup

Coffee

Luncheons _ Grapefruit

Griddle (Jakes Crisp Bacon

Milk

Tmery-commrfTonT"^^ expect,jus to form thejhabit of He operated a grocery business her?

A gift of $1,000 from Mrs. Anna V. Reed of Whittier, Calif., is an­nounced by Olivet college for estab-li^ing_a_iand. f o n prize* i n exteiwpo-

Baked Apples with Cream Bran-fruit Muffins

Coddled Eggs Broiled Ham Coffee Milk

for 40 years, but retired about 20: years ago . !

They have been in good health and live in their own home in Fremont. They have three sons qnd two da a tere. One daughTer, Mrs. Xouis Va liere, celebrated her fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1930.

0 - ' •

First Woman Graduated \ From Hope 50 Years Ago

ailing the ocean blue without picking raneous speaking, the awards to be up all sorts of nautiral phrases now known as the Arthur I. Reed Adelphic would you? We may even, if we prizes, in honor and memory of Mrs. cruise ^about long enough, be able to ( Reed's husband, who was graduated figure out what time it is at four bells, from Olivet in 1870. Mrs. Reed also and so on. is a graduate of Olivet of the class of

Orange Juice Rice Flakes with Top Milk

Corn Muffins Plum Butter Coffee

]J VTvid shades are .so e x t re m el y flat-^iS^L tering to certain types of women that '.i eems a pity.they ever consider pas-

The contest is open to all men and women of the college. A faculty corn­

e l -

'A

Commencement week at Hope col­lege next June will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the- graduation of the first two women with bachelor of arts degrees. y *

The class of tf881 numbered n i n e -seven men and two women. Four members entered the mini?*try, ofl whom Rev. Phh*p T. Phelps, son of Dr. Philip Phelps, Hope's first p r u ­dent, is sole survivor.

The two women are Mrs! Frances Phelps, the daughter of Dr. Phelps, who married Dr. Jfohn A. Otte. .the first medical missionary of the Re-1

formed church/denomination to entqr the mission field in Chinr., and Mrs. [ E\ A. Whitenack, nee Sarah G. Alcott' of River Falls, Wis., whose husband formerly was connected with Hope's faculty.

School Garb Will Be Overalls and Aprons

As a New Year resolution, Eaton Rapida boys will wear overalls and girls will introduce aprons as part of their wearing apparel while in attend­ance at High school. The Board of Education says it is the most sensible move the pupils have made in a long time.

• • — o .

Ionics Spelfdowns Will Begin Jan. 26

The aivraal preliminary spelldowns for SQftaoh of Ionia county will begin Jan. 26, with Danby and Portland towoettps participating. This will be <|t* eifhitft year of the contests. Coun­ty fchool Commissioner Erwood I t . Brat* will supervise them.

"e-is and ice tones, but One is always mittee has been appointed by Presi-intrigued by something new and dent Jam&s King to draw up rules and Wrongly impelled toward something, regulations governing the awards. fashionable. j o .

There-are a great many green be-! Reward or Reticence ing worn. While green may seem! "But surely," cried Jean, "You difficult to'wear, it is quite as true! didn't tell him straight out that you of this as of other colors, that there loved him?" is sure to be at least one shade po&si-! "Goodness, no" Mildred said calm-

1 hie for every type. At the moment, ly. "He had to squeeze it out of me."

An Ode to a Bee! By Frank K. Glew

I was sitting in the^clover _ When a spritely, buzzing bee, /

Nonchalantly did meander To my, haunt beneath a tree.

What a buzy little fellow He had been among the flowers;

What a thirst for pollen sweetness, As he scouted through the hours.

Buzz . . . buzz . . . his ceaseless humming Played a tune upon my nerves,

And I soon began aswatting As he flitted 'round in curves;

I mistook his friendly motives J As I leapt upon my feet, FEAR was clutching at my heartstrings;

NO . . . that humming was not SWEET! Alas, my futile swinging

Missed this bee by quite a mile, And I failed in frenzied anguish

To perceive that bee's grim smile. Then the buzzing grew more violent,

To this day I hear its ring! Bees are "sweet" \t making honey

But. they're "devils"- with their sting!

Modes and Manners

Question—"How soon in advance of the- wedding should the .rehearsal take place?—Olive H."

Answer—The day before the wed­ding is the most propitious time. It helps all those taking part in the cere­mony to get into the proper frame of mind for the wedding. This is con­ducive to helping them remember their respective places and parts.

• * »

Question—"What is the proper way to eat fish? When eating out I never ordex it if I can help it, except filet

Maternal Instinct in Script "Dear Janet Winton: I have been

ioi iowmgyourart icles and'flnd tfrem very interesting- i>u much DO that I have bought a book on the subject of graphology. What does my handwrit­ing tell?— R. M. D., Chicago."

a good example for others. You are firm without being overbearing, as sedate capitaTTetters and earnesr*"t" bars show. ——— "

Printed "s 's" are misleading. They give this brief excerpt of your hand-wrtttng~a printed~look. —Actually *' is the only lower case letter in your handwriting that follows the printed form. The broken up baseline of

You have an instinct for under-jitanding—th^-child-mind^ The very childish quality of your scriptshows this, revealing a faculty for meeting the child halfway and encouraging himT at the same -time, to travel hi»

e alone"? — Children under your care would

have the advantage of a rich moral and spiritual background. They would

3* JruutJ SO •&&/*-£ -tCfrrf*

A cou words, also adds to the print effect. But this is a sign of intuition, an in­teresting find in such an otherwise methodical handwriting:

of sole, which, as everyone «knows, is boneless and easy to eat.—Vera M."

. Answer—A silver "knife generally accompanies a fish course. It is not intended for general use as fish is usually flaky, and when it isn't it is easy to cut with the fork. The knils may be used to divide a too large por­tion, however.

In eating fish, if there are any bottQg they should be removed before the fork is-carried to the mouth. This does away^ i th the unlovely habit o picking bones from the mouth ami placing them on the plate. Besides, i is much safer. Many a person been known to choke and cough an have an altogether unpleasant time the result of a fish bone.

When fish can be cut up the*5 cente and opened out flat, it should be don Incidentally, this is another use which the silver knife can be put Then the bones can be removed b; holding them between the thumb an first finger, making it possible to ahead-' with the' fish unharrrpe>«d. ( bones. \ ,

0>r * - ' '

Close Resemblance Little Mary, age 5, driving th

the country with her father, for the first time saw cat-tails growing along the road.

. "Oh, -daddy," she, cried, shaking her lather's arm in her excitement, "look1

at the hot-dog garden!" „

Your handwriting shows cultural aspirations. You are deliberate, persis­tent and self educated. A natural fac­ulty for versatility is highly developed in your handwriting. Rounded writing shows this and full loops. There is imagination, as high " i " markings show, but this has been subordinated to reason.

The outstanding characteristic in your hand is a talent for dealing with people. The leisurely tempo of your hand and the easy flow express tact. Pronoun " I " reveals you to be mod­est, which in turn enables you to be t fi lpTfiwf. r> f <*>tllAt*fi_

Wo....'.i who use this style of writ­ing, make wonderful m o t h e r s , especially for young children. There is a firmness, a matter-of-factness, mingled with kindly understanding tifet is rarely met with.

.Weitidious and

develop initiative and resourcefulness. They would never be disobedient, be. cause in your eyes there are no "bad" and—m>—"good" children: ~¥ou__ recognize that undesirable habits must always be replaced with good ones. And when parents become lax in their duty, the "sins of the fathers" are visited upon the children in the form of undesirable traits. Your forte, de­cidedly, is in dealing with young chil­dren, as mother or kindergartner.

A sense of decoration is shown in the symmetrical border which frames your letter. Subconsciously, form and balance enter into any handicraft of yours. You should develop this faculty —also a sense of color, and a natural handiness which curtailed initial and

- -terminal strokes indicate. Large writing shows generosity,

but you are not expansive conver­sationally. Quite the contrary, certain incurving strokes show a natursj re­ticence, though you are neither Mttt* conscious nor shy. You lists* fS>

fci her early youth, she develooed a dsmrm that captivated all around h«t, smd as she reached maturity that charm increased, and it stayed with her until her death, at ninety, in 1766,

Possessed of high spirit, she led m the circles in which sht moved. In the earlier part of her life, she was a leader in the more licentious set in

where recognized. This quality may largely

for her marvelous retei power ef fascination th years.

Ninon 31 L'Enclos was born 15, 1616; died October 17, 1706.

mm

< • w ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^w mm ,.i "Jl^JiiPJWMJWliJ

k •.

. ^

DEPARTMENT OF STATE REPORTS

LARGE INCOMES A l t h o u g h few ci t izens real ize t h a t

the- D e p a r t m e n t of S ta t e Ls one of

' Mich igan ' s major r e v e n u e p roduc ing agenc ies , d e p a r t m e n t r eco rds show

w t h a t $51,4&9,376 -were col lected for t h e first eleven months of 1 9 3 1 .

'Among t h e o u t s t a n d i n g highl ights of t h e p a s t year is the fac t t h a t w i th 66 bu i ld ing and loan associa t ions as­se t s of $165,269,540 o p e r a t i n g in Michigan unde r t h e superv is ion of t h e d e p a r t m e n t , not o n e of t hose associa­t ions closed its doors b e c a u s e of ad­v e r s e economic condi t ions . Indica­t i ons a r e t h a t all will " come t h r o u g h " in ' f ine shape.

The gasoline t a x was the b igges t r e v e n u e p roduce r of t h e d e p a r t m e n t , $22 ,010 ,367 being collected d u r i n g t h e first e leven months of 1 9 3 1 . Moto r vehic les weight t a x e s t o o k , second p lace wi th $20,182,885. F r o m corpora ­t i on , pr ivi lege and f ranchise fees, t h e d e p a r t m e n t tu rned $7 ,023 ,936 into t h e t r e a s u r y . The n e w o p e r a t o r s and chauf feurs license l aw ySeWed $772 , -558 , while the old law, in effect b u t a few m o n t h s last sp r ing , p r o d u c e d $22,-0 5 1 .

F r o m t h e malt t a x the- s t a t e received $ 5 9 5 , 1 7 3 , all of which b y l a w m u s t

used to pay the s t a t e ' s s h a r e of car­ing ior~WDTTcTItaTsT—TnT^aTIToTn^ t i t l e division collected $ 4 8 8 , 3 2 1 ; whi le l icens ing of pr ivates de tec t ives yielded $2 ,000 . D e p a r t m e n t inves t iga to r s a d d e d $146,138 t o the s t a t e ' s r e v e n u e s t h r o u g h enforcement of laws r e g a r d ­ing u s e of foreign l icense p la tes a n d

- C o m p e l l i n g truck o w n e r s to pay p r o p e r fees on t h e correc t we igh t s of the i r vehic les , and $76,322 f rom m a l t t a x en fo rcemen t .

1 o

A.L.T.MityUseGas A m e r i c a n Light and Trac t ion Corn-

p a n ^ p a r e n t concern pithe Muskegon Gas Company , is c losely w a t c h i n g de -

D I D Y O U K N O W ? - Illustrated Question Box By R. J. SCOTT

A HUMAM O - O C K -

i p F j U O N D O X ,

-C&& -ffei-U-- T t W E . W ! < H I M

M l W U T E . , t > A y O R N J Q r r T

MEXICAN JUMPINO BEANS coN-rAiM -rhe. P U P A 01 s A N INSECT* WHOSE SPASMODIC MOVEMENT^ CAUSE IT <0 H O P AMD ROL-L-

Copyright. 1931, by Central Pre^a Association, l a c

State Creates Force to Aid Bank Reopenings

A la rgo n u m b e r of s t a t e bunks will

be reopened as a resu l t of the es tab­

l i s h m e n t of a new division by the s t a t e

b a n k i n g d e p a r t m e n t for the express pu rpose of superv i s ing b a n k i n g insti­t u t i o n s which have failwl and "aiding t h e m in reorgan iza t ion p lans , it was a n n o u n c e d r ecen t ly by Rudolph K. Reicher t , s ta te b a n k i n g commiss ioner . Mr. Re icher t said t h a t s t eps were be­ing t aken to reopen many of th^ banks , which i m p e n d e d ope ra t ions dur ing the pas t two years , a n d predic ted tha t a score or more of the closed inst i tu­t ions would be r e t u r n e d to s o l v e n c y w i t h o u t loss to c i the r depos i tors or stockholders .

C o m m e n t i n g en the plan worked out by t h e b a n k i n g d e p a r t m e n t , Commis­s ioner Reichert dec la red t h a t it would be feasible in both large- and small

MICHIGAN VILLAGES SHOW REDUCTION

IN TAXATION

w?

Of 14i> r e p o r t i n g , 101 Michigan vil­

lages reduced t h e i r 1981 t axes a s

aga ins t 1930, a cco rd ing to a compila­t ion recent ly compLeted by the Mich­igan Municipal l e ague and now being p r e p a r e d for d i s t r ibu t ion .

T a x r educ t ions in 55 of the 101 vi l lages exceeded 10 p e r c e n t ; 47 of these reduct ions exceed ing 15 p e r c e n t ; 21) exceeded 20 p e r c e n t ; 12 exceeded 30 p*r cent and ' 3 exceeded 50 per cent . Most of the vil lages which did no t show t a x reduct ions e i ther made t h e same levy o r increased small a m o u n t s wi th the except ion of a

communi t i e s , a n d men t ioned Lans ing , ] few which were fo rced t o increase to Bay City and Ionia as typical commu- \ increase to cover heavy debt cha rges . nitifcs_ia."which t h e plan probablv will T h e t abu la t ion inc ludes 1929 t a x e s be a ( lop t ed r "The -nucT<us oTThe-pTan^^'^ i l I"as~l"?W-ail-<r-"1931, '" lndtcat ing---is an a g r e e m e n t to be signed by d e - ! t h a t du r ing the y e a r from 1929 t o flositors u n d e r which they must con-; 1930 j u s t 75 p e r c e n t o f the 149 r e ­sent not to s t a r t r u n s upon the inst i tu-! duced the i r t a x r e v e n u e s . F o r t y vil-

doors are re-agvee to with-

tions as soon as th opened . They mus t d r a w no more t h a n 15 p e r cent of t h e i r deposi ts t he first y e a r and 15 per cen t the second. They will be. per­mi t t ed to m a k e l a r g e r wi thdrawa l s t h e r e a f t e r in "proportion to the abil i ty of t h e b a n k s to pay . N o interes t will bo paid on sav ings deposi ts unti l the reorgan ized b a n k s a r e financially suurtil.

l ag t s of the. 75 made reduc t ions of more than 10 p e r cen t in tha t yea r , and a somewha t l a r g e r p ropor t ion of tlie reduc t ions were in t h e h i g h e r b racke ts , compared with 1931 reduc ­t ions.

The da ta shows tha t 81 of the 149 villages reduced assessments in 1930 u n d e r those of 1929 , a n d in 1931 r e ­duct ions were made by 108 of t h e vity-

lagi's". — —

AIR TRAVELS FARES CUT

Michigan Companies j Get Big Refunds on I

United States Taxes

Dras t i c r educ t i ons in a i r t r ave l r a t e s affecting T r a n s a m e r i c a n Air­l ines ' connec t ions to 136 ci t ies via U n i t e d Ai r Lines , now effective, w e r e a n n o u n c e d by Char les R. Speers , m a n ­a g e r of De t ro i t ' s Ai r l ines t i cke t office. All a i r se roce i"ro-m_ pe_troit_to_ti ieae 136 ci t ies is n o w app rox ima te ly t h e

' velbprnefflt*-of n a t u r a l gas p r o d u c t i o n ! same as t r a i n f a r e p lus Pu l lman ac-in the Mt. P leasan t a rea"wi th the" v i e w 1 comTni5^tlOTis.-The^hTOUgh*' a i r fa re

M a n u f a c t u r i n g conce rns in Michi­

gan shared h a n d s o m e l y in t h e $69, -

476 ,930 t a x r e f u n d s m a d e by the

F e d e r a l t r e a s u r y in 1 9 3 1 , accord ing to

GAME PRESERVES BEING PLANNED

FOR MICHIGAN

" T h e s e r e q u e s t s are not unfa i r t o ' Besides the i n f o r m a t i o n on t a x rev* t h e depos i t o r s . " the b a n k i n g commis-1 enues and assessed va lua t ions for t^ie s ioner said. " U n d e r receiverships they [ th ree years , the compi la t ion also in -a r e rece iv ing less t han 15 per cent of; e ludes the p e r cap i t a cost of gove rn -t h e i r money each year , and they a re i merit in the munic ipa l i t ies r e p o r t i n g . paid no in teres t . U n d e r the new plan

, the b a n k s will be res to red to solvency ' and the c u s t o m e r s eventua l ly will r e ­

ceive all of the i r money if they wish to w i t h d r a w it. U n d e r a receivership it is improbable t ha t t h e deposi ts will

i ever be r e t u r n e d in fu l l . " W h e n depos i tors have signed agree -

a r ecen t r e p o r t s u b m i t t e d to Congress . I The initial s t ep in a pro jec t t h a t

The tota l a m o u n t of r e f u n d s in 1931 may make conse rva t ion h i s to ry in t h e

wa« only s l ight ly more t h a n half t h e s t a t e of Michigan was t aken recen t ly j m e n t s of this n a t u r e , officials of the

+ 1 9 3 0 ^ f o * a l of $126 ,836 ,333 ' . ' T h e ) w l ^ n f a rmer s , l a n d o w n e r s and . s p o r U - i b a"k . place 25 p e r mem g a t h e r e d a t m e e t i n g s in Cla re , i

t o possible s t a t ewide d i s t r ibu t ion t h r o u g h its several p r o p e r t i e s . T h e Muskegon—Qzr ,—Grand—Rapids ' G a s L igh t , Detroi t Ci tyKJas and t h e W a s h -t e n a w Gas Company of A n n A r b o r , a r e Michigan subsIduTrTei of Aln"erTcari L ight and Trac t ion .

f rom De t ro i t t o N e w York City n o w is $40 .95 which is a r educ t i on of $7 ,75 f rom the old fare.;—-The a i r f a re f rom

1931 figures inc lude only the sums ac ­

tua l ly re funded" in cash and d o h o t In­

c lude a b a t e m e n t s a g g r e g a t i n g $100 , -

087 ,067 and c red i t s a g a i n s t f u t u r e

taxcM totahTIg-$&8 t717,559.

W e s t B r a n c h r Rose Ci tv and P r e s c o t t

cent of all deposit.-m a spncmT rese rve fund- a long With t h e assets of t h e or iginal financial

, . , , , , - — r-tw VT- L.-L. _ ^ s t r u c t u r e , _A n e w o p e r a t i n g f u n d - i s to cons ider the p lan of lh*» N o r t h e a s t ^ " 7 , ., , , r , An

c r ea t ed th rough an assessment of 100

G O L D M E D A L T A N K H E A T E R

50

timo. « V M I inn*—*fl (tuUnMrvad part* heavy c u t

Quick-flri»n:. carburet or-lype

)n>n, QuicK-tinnf. wickle&s bnrner with carburetor-lype mixer, no soot or smoke. Burns kerosene, gasoline or dis­tillate; 30 to 00 hours to a filling. fJtethae built. Money back guarantee. Write tod*x—~ — r~ '

D e t r o i t to Chicago is now $13 .25 and i D e t r o i t to Cleveland, $8 .95 , wh ich low Briggs M a n u f a c t u r i n g C o m p a n y , faxes a r e unar?ectedHoy-th*-^p*ese-rrk | -BtTtraf t ;with a r e f u n d - e f $ 2 2 0 , 4 3 6 , cut . The De t ro i t -New York schedule , t a k i n g ' only five nbiir?,- f e a t u r e s fas t , tie luxe mul t i -mo to red p lanes .

In addi t ion a t e n p e r c e n t r educ t i on on all r o u n d t r i p s is also effective,

ern Michigan D e v e l o p m e n t B u r e a u for the fo rmat ion a m o n g fnrmerv

of shoot ing p rese rves for the p ropaga t ion -o-f

..•„ri, „,„r,-,„,i «Mf -my I m a k i n g all a ir t r ave l r a t e s a p p r o x i -

led the Michigan list. Dodge B r o t h e r s ,

Inc. , was second with $ 1 0 7 , 3 5 6 ; a n d

H u d s o n M o t o r C a r C o m p a n y w a s r e ­funded $ 1 0 7 , 3 3 1 . O t h e r r e f u n d s m a d e to c o r p o r a t i o n s i nc luded : F i s h e r

m a t e wi th t h e c o r r e s p o n d i n g ra i l road 1 Bou-y» S25,05R; Gem nil Motors , $10;». accommoda t ions . J 5 3 1 ; B u r r o u g h s A d d i n g Machine,} thesi f a re plus P u l l m a n , a c e

_ o

g a m e . The nieetirig a t Clare consisted

chic fly of bus iness men and spor t s - -men. It wa.t no t in t ended for consid­e ra t ion of definite ac t ion .

T h e t h r e e m e e t i n g s in O g e m a w ! coun ty were a t t ended by f a rmers ami j l andowner s . T h e en thus iasm dis- ' \ p layed in _ the^g"neral discussions a t

mee t ings proved t h a t the b u r e a u

pe r cent on the s tockholders , a sum which eventual ly will be r e tu rned to

m—when earn ings of the hunk war

The tota l t ax levy of the 149 vi l lages in 1931 is $3 ,000 ,910 , of which 22 of the la rger vi l lages levied approx i ­mately $2 ,000 ,000 o r near ly t w o -th i rds of the to t a l .

On discussing t h e informat ion in-th© bullet in, Di rec tor Haro ld D. Smith of the Municipal League , calls a t t e n t i o n to the fact t h a t in the absence of un i ­form methods of accoun t ing a n d .re-porting^TaTtiitt0n7s m a y exist in t h e in* format ion, yet the analys is indica tes a definite d o w n w a r d t r e n d in vi l lage t axes in response to demands for t a x reduct ion.

. o— — " A i d now tha t I 've Luhl you I 'm

r a n t it and solvency has been fu l l / res tored . Banks adop t ing the plan will be opera ted u n d e r the supervision of the b a n k i n g d e p a r t m e n t . Mr. Reich-

~now going to m a r r y Agnes , more tiling j j j _ lik ^ to

you the re ' s one

ge t off my

er t pointed out t h a t a plan of this ' had b ' " t i successfully adopted by Sal ine Savings bank and the Ypsi! Savings hank .

ype the

anti

ches l . " E i t h e r : " W h a t ' - t h a t ? " "A tatooed hea r t with

i iame on i i . " Maggie ' s

Inet, Iowa WSartoBe Teles

Free Car ParTat bot

^Wheii

L

Resils] As_„a r e s u l t o f - t h e

_L-pa4xel. of land to C h a r l o t t e by F i tch S. , Beach , Cha r lo t t e manufac ture r -—tht r

Acl P r o m p t l y W h e n B l a d d e r I r r e g u l a r i t i e s D i s t u r b S l e e p

- ' Are you bo thered w i t h blad» der i r r e g u l a r i t i e s ; b u r n i n g , s can ty or too f requen t passage and getting u p a t n igh t ? Heed p r o m p t l y t h e s e s y m p t o m s . T h e y may w a r n of some dis­ordered kidney or b ladder con­dition. Users e v e r y w h e r e rely on Doan's Pills. R e c o m m e n d e d

iibr 50 years. Sold e v e r y w h e r e .

city now has a paved p a r k i n g place; for --1 m o t o r - c a r s . The city pa id the cost of - ^ f * " 4 « ^ - ^ - ^ lot, T m T r - f ^ f * f ^ *hftt ff^*

i land should be used for f ree a u t o m o -| bile p a r k i n g so l ong as deemed necete-; s a ry by the counci l a n d a f t e r t h a t i t i could be used as a public p l a y g r o u n d i or pa rk .

The lot will a c c o m m o d a t e 85 c a r s . i S h r u b s will be p l a n t e d t o add t o i t s

$ 1 8 , 2 8 9 ; H a r v e y Sons M a n u f a c t u r i n g ! Projec t has an appea l fo r l andowner s , hail Shipments Increase emmiarryr-* sf1^Stt8-r- i t tJo--Motor C a r r o t was- point^d-eut_a±_cac_h_ g a t h e r i n g Taken as Pickup Augurj£ $41 ,890^ A l p e n a Richardson_Lujnb_er! D M ItLT. ^^3^ P | a " ii; Ln.fl ondy^o^re - ~ ~ C o m p a n y , $ 2 1 , 4 2 2 ; E x - C e l l - 0 Ai r - [ tha t , can expec t to enl is t the sympa- ' AlTTnTrraiic of 15,3 ft^-g.-nt in D+-c ra f t and Tool, $ 2 , 9 9 4 ; J . L. Hudson ! t h e t i c co-opera t ion of f a r m e r s in an C H T , b e r sh ipments on the Ludington

n n _ o i _ a ; ^ m > V | » n y r ^ 7 T ; U 4 ; Larrowtr MHlHigti-ncn^sfw^wild^^^ it shows division of Hie 1'ere M a n i u o t t e rail-Company , $(i,G52; Michigan Alkal i ! t n f ' l andowner s a chancer for-fmafle*4 tTorn pa n T 7 ~ ^ ^ 3 5 2 T ~ P a T l t e 7 _ D a v is STS^J? Co., $ 7 , 4 8 5 ; ' T i m k e n - D e t r o i t Axle

tfi-^^h#m^ig--J . B. F o r d , Kel ler , De-

( b e a u t y &*4 a t a ^ l e ^ J s ^ a ^ i o ^ t ^ ^ n ^ m ^ - t r ^ ^ ^ 3 5 3 T ^ t s s D ? ^ . "Gossr^^-&**er**m=^^g£owUn of t h e d o n o r will be p laced in the cen t e r of the p a r k i n g space.

* A t t o r n e y E r n e s t G. Davis , coun ty p o o r commiss i6ner , a n d an a l d e r m a n f rom each w a r d a r r a n g e d for l abo r f rom u n e m p l o y m e n t l ists. T h e p a r k c o m m i t t e e w i th "DnrhrC. Gee as cha i r -m a n , m a d e p lans for t h e p ro jec t , a n d H a r v e y A. Wi l l iams , c o u n t y s u r v e y o r , d o n a t e d his serv ices . O. J . Bo t tomley , C h a r l o t t e c o n t r a c t o r , supervised t h e work .

Bridal Wreath Bu*h 10c Postpaid

[ 10 days yet in Lower Mich., if fo; So l l i er ' I (iravo oi' w.th 2 <;r,hi St;ir Mothe. 's ad | dresses. Tht>e bn*hes in rich dirt bloom j full and white \n*i week of May, '33. 3 for 1 25c, 7 for o'<c, 1.". for SI , all jxistpakl. Fin I for Hedtre, or Amour Privet Hedjre 3c up

Alberta Peach 6c; Mont. Cherry 12c up L a r e e cm-h orders del'd. Refs. hundreds bearing order*, jn years fruit and nursery experter; re - ^* pg, irhrrrtmjf r a l e * for 4c s t a m p — J a n u a r y only or with orders. Cutting down near jri-owinu cost just now to p»v robber taxes . Remit now to Gobies Nurseries Gobies. Mich.

C o m p a n y , $6^3 7_5. ~ S-rrmnff t-W indivjdivpa>i

funds were m a d e w e r e : De t ro i t , $ 1 4 , 7 3 8 ; K. T. t ro i t , $54,15!) ; Mrs.* Hell K. Jud*son, ( i rosse Po in te , $ 2 0 , 7 2 6 ; H o w a r d E . Coffin, Det ro i t , $ 4 , 2 4 4 ; ,S> T. C r a p o , De t ro i t , $ 9 , 3 8 8 ; Mrs . S a r a h F isher , Det ro i t , $ 7 , 7 5 4 ; Donald J . Goss, De

T. F. Mars ton , s c c r e t a r y - m a n a ^ r of th-e b u r e a u ; T h o m a s McClurc , tranv

' au tho r i t y ; ;ihoTHsrr>'-M. J^w>tt , ^my?-e r<7vreT""and advoca te , TiTtTtTrssrd thT*?^ m i ' f t i n g s ,

Mr. Mars ton out l ined the plan pro­posed, asked for an expression of a d e m a n d for such a m o v e m e n t and promised the fo rma t ion and the. full co-opera t ion of the o rgan iza t ion in

rttvisi'o'n'^ i of ]«>:$(>

s r n nrnrTTr'Tt wttrr~th r for t h i .-ami/ p< rio( out by ra i l road offirials v> i 'ii t ha t I J u.-' !)••>.- in genera

t ro i t , $ 1 7 , 0 5 0 ; Mrs . G. E. Goss, De­t ro i t , $ 2 4 , 5 1 6 ; W . L. Goss, De t ro i t , $17 ,718 ; . B . E. H u t c h i n s o n , Det ro i t , $ 1 3 , 2 5 8 ; David M. I r e l a n d , De t ro i t , $ 1 1 , 8 8 0 ; Mrs . E r n e s t i n e K a h n , De­t ro i t , $ 1 1 , 7 4 2 ; Je s se L. Woods , De-

t r o i t , $ 3 , S 2 ? r ^ m o n r L. F o r d , Grosso

»*•

">

P o i n t e , .$7 ,774; Mrs . Viola M. Ham mond, Grosse Po in te , $ 3 , 2 3 1 .

0

Couple Given Charge Of Ionia's Infirmary

- Mr. and Mrs . H a r r y J ackson , long employed a t the ins t i tu t ion , have been appo in ted to succeed Mr. and Mrs . Cha r l e s G a t e s , . fo r 18 y e a r s supe r in ­t e n d e n t and m a t r o n of the c o u n t y inf i rmary. Mr. and Mrs aga in become r e s i d e n t s of S a r a n a c , w h e r e they haye a home.

T h e c o u n t y _ h o m e , o c c u p y i n g a sight ly spot in Ber l in t ownsh ip , bound­ed o n the sou th by old M21 and on the no r th by G r a n d r ive r , w a s bu i l t or ig inal ly t o a c c o m m o d a t e 50 inma te s b u t now is c a r i n g for 90 . The excess is be ing lodged in the- f o r m e r chape l , m a d e over i n t o a d o r m i t o r y for t h e men . F o r t y of t h e p r e s e n t popula t ion a r e w o m e n .

Carferries Turn in Record in 1931

and fo rma t ion of associa t ions d e s t g r r a t ^ - a s -sho^t-int- • p r e s e rve s if t h e f a r m e r s and land- H > Wallace,, s u p e r i n t e n d e n t of th<

division, pointed out th-* fact tha t rail

shif.' int-rtb

is pointe< a hopeful ~w nTYjTrdvTnir.

l-'our t housand , three fifty-sevwi more car load-ov'-r the divi.-ion in the of Di ' t 'ember t h a n in/ thi of the closing month of la.-t year. In the H>31 )>eriofl :52,776 loads were ca r r i ed as c o m p a r e d wi th 28,419 in the 27 davs of December , 1!>30

thr-

te soap iHat't Known and Sold The World Anurtd

Cnticwrtr Nothing Better for Daily Us«

Addrcnf: "Cotlcnr», Sample tte*.

• t»«pt 11B, Ualtm,

mimf^4

hundred an d were shipper! first '11 da>s first 27 days

in a n n o u n c i n g

owner s so desired. , Mr. Mars ton poin ted o u t the fac t r o a d s h i p ' m e n t s a lways a r e cons idered

tha t wild life, is a p o t e n t lure for p r o s - ' t 0 s h o w t h , . t n . n ^ o f business and he pect ive tour i s t s and spor t smen a n d dec la red he looked for a gradual im-t h a t a cons tan t ly inc reas ing supply '-^prnv«.m>-nt d u r i n g the coming year .

am Is of

tooKtwm Counterfeit Aspirin!

THOUSANDS of boies of coun te r f e i t a sp i r i n h a v e

increase WTTTis;—\ b e e n p t r t " o t r " t h e m a r k e t r Watch out. Take no chances and flatly refuse to accept

Records for cross l ake tf ips w e r e s m a s h e d b y t w o P e r e M a r q u e t t e car-f e r r i e s , N o , . 21 and No. 22 , m a r i n e officials have a n n o u n c e d . E a c h of t he se fe r r i es m a d e 1,018 t r i p s f rom L u d i n g ­t o n t o Wiscons in po r t s . This is be­lieved the mos t trips- m a d e by any ves­sel in the h i s to ry of L a k e Michigan.

The City of Fl in t , flagship of t h e fleet, r e t a i n s its wor ld r eco rd in mi le­a g e , a l t h o u g h i t s r eco rd of t r i p s f rom L u d i n g t o n t o M i l w a u k e e J w a s e igh t u n d e r t h a t of N o . 21 and 22 . T h e FtinVg t o t a l m i l e a g e f o r t h e yea r is 101 ,000 .

C a r f e r r i e s 21 a n d 22 w e n t a b o u t 7 5 , 0 0 0 miles in 1931 ove r th© long r u n to Mi lwaukee a n d ahdr t r u n s t o Man i towoc a n d K e w a u n e e . E a c h c a r ­r ied m o r e t h a n 2 0 , 0 0 0 f re igh t c a r s .

C a r f e r r y 1 5 , o ldes t vessel on t h e l akes , a n d f e r r i e s of o t h e r fines have topped the 1,0*0 mark in trips.

necessary Nto sat isfy the dem the vis i tors w h o benefit this reg ion wi th the cash they leave w h e r e v e r they go.

T h o m a s McClure , who has been a prac t ica l s t u d e n t of the va r ious phages of conse rva t ion fo r 35 yea r s , descr ibed the garnet p r e s e r v e s of Scot land w h e r e t h o u s a n d s of A m e r i c a n s go to get t h e g a m e for which they pay $10 ,000 ,000 a y e a r in shoot ing pr ivi leges . Mr.

I o n i a ' McClure emphas ized the intensi ty Ga tes | wi th which t h e Scotch e n g a g e in g a m e

m a n a g e m e n t and he b r o u g h t the pic­t u r e down to this region by s t a t i ng t h a t this s t a te can become , t h r o u g h c o n c e n t r a t e d effort, t he ' g r e a t e s t w i l d Ufe sect ion on the N o r t h Amer i can cont inen t .

, H e explaine-d methods of g a m e r e a r i n g and s t ressed the need for im­med ia t e act ion. " H a r r y M. J e w e t t sketched the his­

t o ry of h u n t i n g and fishing, dep lo red the d iminish ing g a m e supply ami de­c la red a m a r k e t of e n o r m o u s demand promises profit for those who produce g a m e .

. A t the TCose City mee t ing , Phil l ip V. F le tche r , Alpena , m e m b e r of t h e s t a t o conserva t ion commission, urged l a n d o w n e r s to go ah*»ad-with the p r o j ­ec t "which may well m a d e conserva­t ion h i s to ry in t h e Uni ted S t a t e s . "

o

TRAPPERS ATTENTION! W e want l e v e r s ! thousand muikrat furs for immediate uae. Will pay highest market price*. AI»o all other (ur*. Ship to u* f o r - h i f h e t t prices.

Wolverine Hide & Fur Co. 259 S. F R O N T

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN

any box not marked "Genujne Bayer Aspirin." Don't put any tablet not marked "Bayer" in-your stomach. T e l l y o u r f a m i l y a n d y o u r f r i e n d s of this. Refuse any preparation offered you as the " s a n e " or "l ike" Genuine Bayer Aspirin.

Dtmmnd and accept onty thi* Biyer" m*rk*d ttbimt thit

T$S0jn%5;

D O M NOT HARM T H I HEART

Gmld Mine of Ideas •*. —jor Farmers

State Prison Houses SOI More Than 1930

Michigan s ta te priso>n finish^ t he y e a r lf>31 wi th 604 m o r r p r i soners b e - 1

h m d its walls t h a n there- w e r e a y e a r ago. ~Wh77n t h e cet t~1rtocks w e r e ' -locked J a n / 1 t h e r e were- a to ta l of; 5,690 inma te s oft the roll* of t h e pris-on. The c o u n t haKr»«en well above 5 ,700 a t variouH t i m e s ^ t h r o u g h o u t t h e t y e a r , b u t r e c e n t pa ro le s haWe^reeulted in_a s l ight lower ing . T h e popu l a t i on of t h e inr t t tutk>n n o w is n e a r l y ^ x ^ t i m e * t h e t o t a l 15 y e a r * a g o w h e t h e r e w e r e only 976 p r t eone r s .

i ^ t h e meet remarkable book ever farmer*," tayt one authority. • ttiiilNMmciicil nature V

841 Discoveries . . ; ^ . - ^ make* a fortune.

t — y>aa»<n

Saw farm totl* • • gardtfi w»r» • • poultry

t» O* tkt 1KB IJf • • t»u>«Hold M l * H a* mttcellanaou*

farm warn MOM ttMOat. AMMO a,

trapalBt -

taatad and found to bo •at of UM artkte* an illutuatoi •r enoaiga. The devtcss do-•a>kt baxMat of tkaaa pktww

I way that would toaure you nbera ejew*'' •ct best thine —you may hav V**

MMiuerwaifMt' lm*t*» VO pac««MaV ItWaMIAfMl

Justsmd $1 and th* book will be mailed to you postpaid

NOVELTY GARDEN CLUB ^ ^ , > , larket Avenue, S. W. - Grand RAbidi, mSm\V4

i-

f

1 ¾ Piadfl^ DUpatckWedne>day> February 10, 1932

MARION

Gerald Wellman of Morristown New Jersey, is visiting his mother, Mrs. Cynthia Wellman, who has re­turned to her home here after spend­ing several weeks in Howell at the J homes of her sons, George and Silas Wellman.

Grrntest 6-PIy Heavy Doty Tires

in History ?

•>PIy Heavv Duly

Lifetime Guarantee \EalLOvertfize

fc'rl

Above, the stylish, extra-sturdy * {_.

Weather. At your left, i ts lower-priced teammate—the new, extra-strong PathV finder. Big, handsome, full overall* Heavy Duty tires—Goo d y e a r*s latest 1030 creations. Values only the world** largest rubber company can offer.

Built for sopef-protection. F o r hard .drircrt. Vot roads hard on tires. Six

t

plies of matchless Supertwist C o r d (Goodjea/ patent) under their treads, Cackcd b; our friendly, .all-yeni .servieaw

UBE LAYBY DIXIE OIL STATION

MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE CO.

The "Town and Country Club" was entertained at the home of Horace A. and Josephine Hanson Friday even­ing. Light refreshments were served.

Mrs. Ray C. Jewell and son, Spenc­er, Mrs. Bruce Roberts were Thurs­day dinner guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Basil White.

Mrs. John Fedewa was in Lansing Saturday.

Howard Gentry and family and Virgil Dean will move from the D. D.. Monroe farm to , the^^Birdse l l farm on West Grand' River near Howell^

Mrs. Ray Jewell and Spencer were week end guests at Bus B. Smith's.

Mrs. Loyal Gilchrist -entertained her son and daughter 7 and families from Detroit over Sunday,

Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Hoover and sons, Kenneth and Dale, o f Howell, the Misses Marjorie and Dorothy Smith and Spencer Jewell called, at J. D. White's during the week end,

Mr. and Mrs. Peter PnM* •*»»». tamed

BANKERS DEVELOP J NEWFTNANaAID

ProsMont of A m r k m Baakmj AstwoatioB D*»crib*s Plus

aadSflrrk* of National Crodit Corpora tj— (

HWW YORJL—Th* Xational CrsW Corporation,, a bUUom< dollar -coopsto-j tlvs Institution, is the »ttbod workatf] oat by bankers to put lata practical] effect th* c*ntr*l point to Pr*dd**t] Hearer's plan lor renewing th* eofta-moreial and industrial SKttaty ot ft**1

notion as propossdjia Us statssmsat lU> the naiion eJ>Oetoi*r 7, •arty J.

their Bridge Club Saturday evening.

Basil VVJiite ana family spent Sun. day at Mrs. Julia Moore's.

Dr. Lloyd Davis of Howell is caring for Mrs. Earl Meyers who has been very ill the past week.

This community was shocked last Friday to learn of the sudden, death of Mrs. Frank Wright. Always friend­ly and cheerful, Mrs. Wright will be grea'Jy missed in her home aitd clubs to which she belonged. The family has the sympathy of the cntf.re com­m u n i t y i n their bereavement.-.-— — - Eugene Dinkel and family of Pinckney spent Sunday at H. O. Gentry's.

Miss Nina Pfau of Mich. .State Col- . , ., M

* * * t - * p t ^ h e - w « ^ ^

ot ia*y American Bank fM*d,44Ars««atlBler.

* J' i< "' ftniatcfefiy eoop*ra

fee t s t i to anit* th* _ M t t a end increase

tfee aslaetivoaoss ocM^s taaneisj H ^ flees of banks to their i ! • ! • • • ill ties la rwnl districts m west m fat cities. 4 1 e plan will -manshal the banking re-sonrces ot thai cawmtoy, ho explained, fer creating a national Institution Vhose funds will bo loaned wham nee* eseary to banks -which have assets In their portfolios that are thoroughly soon* but are not eligible for loans at

1 reserve bants.

To BsSMit E very body "Th*** IS no rlH^n la ^he United

here.

States but w i l b e n e * in very practical ways from th* results of the operation of this forward-looking plan of cooper-t^toTwhich may be regarded as on* of the most eonstrnwtive steps that hat* been taken tosrsad revivsl of sonnd business sctutf*/' Mr. Haas declared, adding:

T h e National Credit Corporation represents an laBtrttsneatality that should hav* far-renebiag effect in re­storing The-cbnfldjenc* of the public Th* plan not only has been formulated by th* country's leading banking at> thorities, but also will bo carried oat locally as well as nationaly by bank­ing representative*- w h o h a r e given their tim* and thought to this under taking as-a real public service^ _

"Th* American Bankers Association convention was in session at th* tim*

-FOR THOSE WHO REMAIN

When death visit a homo, the first concern it to perform the last service to the loved one in a becoming manner. Whatever is done must express all the reverance and affection that i s felt at snch srtime.

But in addition to this, a farther responsibility rests upon the funeral director. It is his privilege and duty to les-

t sen, as far as lies within his power, the burdens laid upon those who remain behind. By countless little acts of thoughfulness he can make the way easier for them,

We consider this part of our work as import­ant as any other. Our highest aim is to have our patrons look upon us as trusted friends, ready and anxious to serve in any possible way.

P. H. SWARTHOWT FUNERAL* H O M e

'\.

PIMCICNEV H O N E NO,

WANTS, FOR SALE, ETC

W A N T E D _ T o buy buildings to wreck or move. Moving of all kinds done. Phone 35F24, Pinckney

Frank Plaska.

WANTED—Wood to buzz. 75c per hour.

Earl Gallup R. 3

FOR SALE_ hnjj, 4 fr«sh Busker

.sows with pigs, 1 mal; cows with calves at the

Stock Farm 2 miles cast of North Lake Corners on North Terri-

lerlaTRoaxL

FOR SALE^Basc burner in condition. Will be sold cheap.

Roger Carr

good

FOR SALE Three quarter size vio­lin in A i condition. "'

Valentine Szymanski LOST A. black and white English bird dog. Finder please return and re­ceive reward. Phone 64F21, Pinckney , , . A . * . -

- ^ r - ^ T i n ^ - r e ^ w ^ ^ so" Lcke. about 10 yards of swamp

WANTED At my garden at Pattcr-

BABY CHICKS—From bloodtested pedigreed stock in 12 breeds. Get our 1932 prices and descriptive litera­ture. Visitors welcome.

Arrowhead Hatchery, Howell, Michigan.

muck or other material to build up a sandy soil.

Harry L. Fake

FOR Boat

SERVICE, 1 Duroc-Jerscy

George Greiner

ly endorsed It la prlaclpl*. 1 haie ex­amined th* detailed formulation of

William Roche of Woodbind Farm, t h < working.plans as developed by th*

Turn to Your Telephone

"M^stiopjto out-of-town relatives and friends , . . for

making social engagements and to assemble

dinner guests or your hrid^a-group. (juiekly.

Pew things give so much useful service and

* protection at such low cost as your telephone.

-W

Proper Position for Safe Driving

West Anderson, entertain en ar a | euchre party Monday evening. J Among those who attended were Wm. j S. Brogan, Ernest Whitje, Bruce I Roberts, Howell; Gorman K'elly, Dan Driver, Ben, Basil and Norman White A buffet luncheon vs as served at midnight.

M r a n d Mrs^John Mr ^jj^jj^au.JWM» in St. Johns Sunday.

IOSCO exhibited i t the Georges Petit gallery _

transact cd lra*ffiyssj—** IMP- It w**-en*-of--**• pi*c**-#f-f»-scalpture placed on Tiew. It was de­signed to be placed over the Pert* <f*-ITCnf*r; The id*C~oT fashioning was largely dee"t» Rodta's visit t»

.. W;ilti>i- M i l l e r

in Brighton Thursday. Mr. and Mrs, Martin >jideraQn. cn-

tertalhe(1 for Sunday din nor in honor of their daughters, Dorothy and Al berta's, birthday, Mylo J sham and family and James Caskey anri family of Plainfield..

Miss Marion Eisele of ,Ypsilanti spent the week end w:/th her parents, Mr. and._Mrs. JccJEbiek. _ -_==--

Benjic<« Miller and speut Saturday even-

~Tloyd and Thomas Hurd ing in Lansing as guests of the form­er's aunt^ Mrs. FAnma Armj^trong.

Mr. and Mrs. "Erwin. Zwmtck enter-triin.fj the

Incessant labors of seme of the Na< tion'i leading bankers -who have under­taken to put it into practical operation in single-minded devotion to the na­tional welfare, and I am able to say without reservation that the National Credit rnrpnrafcktn — let up by them coasiltstes a practical, sound and eftV d*«t means for_carryIna; out Pjesidejit

"Keever's'pFoposal."

S A L E S M A N _ i o r High Grade Auto Oils and Paints. Large earnings paid weekly. The Royce Refining k Paint Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

WANTED_^Washings to do. Mrs. Wm. Darrow

FOR SERVICE—Holstein bull. | 1 . 0 0 time of service. $1.50 booked.

: -Charles Campbell

FOR -SALE=_er -Exchange*—Thor­oughbred Plymouth Rock Roosters.

Mrs. Wm. B. Gardner

FOR S A L E _ D r y $^,7fi per rord.

wood delivered

M. J. Roche, Anderson

FOR RENr_Desira.ble house in vil­lage of Pinckney

Mrs. G. W. Tecple

itOG BUTCHERING—We will but­cher-hogsfor-f^OO each. Call us if in iu*ed of our services.

Phone 38 Reason 4 Sons

J OR ^ A L f c - - L a r g e - size Courtlamr Howe Ventilator Coal Stove as good as new. Burns any kind of coal. — — B e r n a r d M c O u s k w

MP-WANTED TO BUY—A cream arator in good condition.

James Hynal, Henry Harris fanu.

WA>nrED~WasUng51o"ao. ~ Mrs. Russell Bokros

Rodin'* Famous Statu* Jlodto'ft- watur, the "Tfclnker^1

war

IIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKUIIIini^

> — NOW4KPR0GRESS _ I

Italy la 1876. The sculptor was com­missioned by M. Tuxquet, who told Rodin that he wished to have a doer for the prepoeed palace of deeorative arts. Th* "Thinker" is part of Eo-«in's "Magnum Opus." At the sales

_e>.f.1904 the figure wsjLj^_jtthibj|i*a. Tt was planned te be plac*d en the upper eroasbeam of the gate of hell* where the "Thinker" eould leek dowi on th* scenes of husaaa passion sad woe extended below* him. By pufrlie *«bscription the statue was nfelmately

Monh Trs^^ AJ^^^riot^J nurchaaed and prasented te th* eity Thursday.

Tho Misses. Irene and Luliza Sainns wore Tuesday *>ver night quests of Miss Shirley F.uckley.

Mr. and M\-s. G. A. Kirkland and George and Mrs. Walter Miller at­tended the North Aid Society Thurs­day at Erv ;in Zwinck.

Lconar J Hurd, Fern Lewis, Ruth Ruttmar, and Thomas Hurd' were Sunday afternoon guests of Floyd and Tjemice Miller.

M r. and Mrs. Earl Dunckle and f a n r lily spent Sunday en-ening with

Jfi\\ and Mrs, Ma.rtin Anderson and f amily.

) Mr. and Mrs. Walter Milfcr and ! Robot were Sunday dinner guests* \ of Mr .and Mrs. W. B. Miller and

Dale. Mrs. Walter Miller was in Ann

bnr Monday.

I

Ar-

A L'-O per cent Increase' in con­victions of thfc liquor laws in Canada —government statistics, not prohibi­tion proproganda, doess not speak well for government sold liquor.

Bat* FRIirTXI)

y a m \UT, fM»»ed Bfjr Dr» *Dvdl*y B. Reed, director of health s*rv* l_?t Cyesff*, Is shoving hew th* "p*tl*ct driver" tits behind safety and eomfort. Dr. sUed swlnttd out that mohair volrot

wl0cVh*s a »41* sum** , grips the elolhing aaxLhslpt maia4ai» a

\w Wf'»W aUtlftfsl JWFIIIfst

Would Jnv**ti|at* Bus T r t l e Railroad rights of way* h* dsclar*d,

t*pr*sent tremendous capital invest­ments, en which the railroads hav* also heavy current costs to m**L "They pay every day a million dollars fa tax** and most of this Is on their rights of way," ho said. "Also they spend daily over two million dollars ad­ditional for the proper maintenance of way." He asserted that th* motor-buses hav* not had to pay for their Tights ef way in ny sense that the-rail­roads paid for theirs.

"They have simply-taken possession ef public highways built by public fundi, both state and national," he coa-Unned, "and they have extensively, tnad* thos* highways vastly less com* fortabl*, less saf* and less serviceable for private motorists and others who are contributing chiefly to their crea­tion and maintenance." •

Mr. Stephenson declared that all thes* matters should be thoroughly in-tulr*d into by competent publie bodies, both state and national, with a riew of determining th* equities and basic publie economic interests in­volved, "particularly in respect to their effects upon the nation's railroads.

"I venture to say," he added, "that such inquiries would show whether it is te th* publie interest to let things remain as they are, whether th* situa­tion calls for a new basis ef metorbn* and truck taxes to satisfy th* dsiuitlei ef the case or whether it weald call foi enca drastic action as-threxcjnjlpn ef this traffic from our publie g*n*r*J highways, and th* requirement that, •ven as the railways, it provide as $ part of its own private capital invest­ment Its own rights of way and for tta own maintenanc* of way ont of operst-laffeeom*,"

| The Greatest Fnrnitore Sale in Hie History | | OF OUR BUSINESS YEAR I

( The Diamond Jubilee J SALEOF FUMITURE j

Every Piece of Furniture on Third Floor Reduced | All types of furniture, a great deal of it new, are included at pnccs g

such as we never have been able to offer before. You'll be wise to buy now at the low sale prices. Buy on the deferred

Payment-Plan-... pay out of income as you enjoy furniture

Here Are a Few Typical Saving Examples: 3 $ 9.25 Metal Beds, 3-3 size ^ $ 6.95 $22.50 Wood Be<es, 4-6 size $17.25 $17.50 Daybed -.—.~.^. $14.75 $77.50 3-piece walnut suite $63.00 $59.00 Walnut Dining Room Suite, S pieces, 60 inch buffet, ex­

tension table, Tapestry chair seats $69.00 -59.00 Walnut Dinette Suite, Extension table, buffet, and 4 blue -

leather seat chairs . . - $49.00 $79.44 Davenport and chair covered in tapestry, rust color, button

back $59.60 $139.00 Antique Velvet Davenport and Chair, taupe color with

artistis nail trim N - $99.50 $39.00 Lounge Chairs $27.05 $19.50 Fireside Chair $16.50 $27.50 Tapestry Upholstered Chair $21.50

4 1 9 - 5 0 Breakfast Sets, drop-leaf table and 4 chair* 115,86 $29.00 Hoosjer Kitchen Cabmets „ $19.50 $14.50 Revolving Table, walnut ^ $ 9.75 $18.50 Gateleg Table, walnut. $14.75 All furniture delivered by our trucks within a 40-mile radius, and to

still farther points where purchases warrant. Third Floor-Thone 4161 *

I

S<

e Down mmiiiimiwititiiiuiittHiimmmiMiii

•'.iff1 . • mtmiiiuinnniiiiHiMtitt

WANTED TO pUY

Eggs and all kind* of Poul­try. 1 alto have them for •ale. — *

A#A*Htt*OfF PBOM33FZ3 T /t

Norman Season *EAL ESTATE BROKER

feTO^fteeidvptifi Property and Lake

Fren i tg t a Speciality 1 i J < l «_! > »" d*r W t i t f t y to trjdoL

FbemeNe, IT tonokaoy, ¥ i<*.

r/

Harley Miller of Milwaukee spent] the week end at the home of Mrs. Emma Bnrgo&s. w v » » »

PERI:Y; ELLIS AUCTlONElft

F M B Saks a SiMcuuHy