WEC 2009 Rapporteur Presentation 17 July 2009 Vientiane, Lao PDR.

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  • WEC 2009Rapporteur Presentation

    17 July 2009Vientiane, Lao PDR

  • LAO/020 CORE TEAM

  • The National Tourism and Hospitality Training Centre

  • Direct Employment ProjectionsSource: LNTA

  • ContentsRapporteur PresentationWelcome to The New World OrderInnovating for the New World OrderConclusions of WECSummary of the Sessions10 Main MessagesThe Conference ChallengeCreating the VisionSolidifying the Strategic PillarsStakeholder Implementation ModelsVientiane Declaration

  • Bangkok Circa 1950Bangkok Circa 2000Welcome to the New World Order

  • The Continually Shifting World Order* Thomas Friedman, 2008

    Era/YRSDescription of EraSignificance of Era1700sIndustrial RevolutionShift from Agriculture to Manufacturing takes place in Great Britain and later Western Europe and America.1800s-1945Colonial EraResource and Trade Hungry Western Powers Operating Colonial Networks to support Manufacturing base. WWI and WWII1945-1955Post WWII EraDe-colonialisation and Emergence of Independent Developing World1955-1989Cold WarSoviet West Rift, Iron Curtain, Nuclear Proliferation1989-2009New World OrderFall of the Berlin Wall, Millennium Development Goals, Free Trade2009-Energy-Climate EraHot, Flat and Crowded *

  • Hot Quick FactsShift from Agriculture to Machine first took place in the 1700s in Great Britain and later the Western Europe and America.This drove an increased demand for coal, oil and natural gas all of which produce C02.(Carbon Dioxide).Increased global population and wealth has increased the demand for rice farming, cattle breeding, and solid waste landfill sites all of which produce CH4 (methane).These greenhouse gases (C02 CH4 and others) are disintegrating the earths atmosphere which is causing global warming.The earth has warmed by about .8 degrees celsius since 1750 with the most rapid increase occurring since 1970.The United States has a carbon footprint five times that of China, and over 15 times that of India.

  • Flat Quick FactsThe world economy, since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has been driven by three phenomenon: technology, markets, geopolitics.Ten of millions of people have moved up the economic ladder into the middle class.In the process, much of the world has embraced the American Dream of having things which has driven demand for energy.However, some 2.6 billion people, or 40% of the worlds population, still live on less than $2 a day, with 1 billion of them surviving on the margins of subsistence with less than $1 a day.

  • An AmericumThe American Carbon CopyA grouping of 350million people with a percapita annual incomeabove $15,000 and apenchant forconsumerism.Source: Tom Burke (E3G)

    Description199020082030USA111Europe111China012India012North Asian Peninsula, Southeast Asia and the Pacific012TOTAL258

  • A Harsh RealityIf everyone in the developing world were to catch up to the Americum economic standard of living, world consumption would increase eleven times= 72,000,000,000 people

  • CrowdedQuick FactsIn 1966 when I was born there were 3.4 billion people living on our planet and there were 111 cities with a population of over 1 million.In 2008 population has nearly doubled to 6.7 billion and nearly half live in cities.By 2015, it is estimated that there will be 26 mega-cities with a population of over 10 million people.

  • World Population Growth2008: Total - 6.7 billion/ LDC 5.4 billion/OECD 1.2 billion2050: Total 9.2 billion/ LDC 7.9 billion/OECD 1.3 billionSource: U.S. Census Bureau, International Database.

  • Five Key Challenges of the Hot, Flat Crowded EraGrowing Demand for Scarcer Energy Supplies and Natural ResourcesA Massive Transfer of Wealth to Oil Rich CountriesDisruptive Climate ChangeEnergy PovertyRapidly Accelerating Bio-Diversity LossThomas Friedman, 2008

  • Towards a More Sustainable FutureIncrease Usage of Renewable Energy (clean energy)Reduce Usage of Fossil Fuels (dirty energy)Compete by Out-Greening the CompetitionChina to slow down and commit to reducing consumption (and developing world to follow suit)America to gain the political will to stand up to special interest and commit to a legal framework for the creation of a market for renewable energyDevelopment of a market for carbon credits and other mechanisms of energy trade

  • Innovation

  • 1980: No Laptops

  • Today: Choose Colors!

  • 1980: No CDs

  • Today: 10,000 Songs in your Pocket

  • 1980: No Mobile Phones

  • Today: Ultimate Fashion Accessory

  • Aviation in the 1920s

  • Air Travel in 1970First Commercial Flight: January 22, 1970

    Capacity: 370 Pax

    Range: 5500 miles

    Unit Cost: 21 million dollars in 1966 ($130 million in 2006 dollars)

    Manufacturer: Boeing Aircraft

    SFO-HKG return US$22,000 in todays dollars

  • Air Travel in 20081st Commercial Flight: October 25, 2007

    Capacity: 555 Pax

    Range: 8150 miles

    Unit Cost: $260 million

    Manufacture: Airbus Industries

    SIN-SYD $12,000 for a Suite

  • An Airplane Suite?

  • A-380

  • Change with the Trends or Risk Extinction

  • A key innovation in todays business is experiences. In todays environment of ever more sophisticated consumers, those who deliver memorable customer experiences consistently create superior value and competitive advantage. London School of Business

    People who are in the position to spend dont just throw their money away. They dont want just a product.They want an experience.They want knowledge.They want passion.Ed. F. Kelly, President & CEO, American Express PublishingInnovation in Tourism

  • And the tourism industry says that"Future tourism will be driven by the desire to learn, to experience new things and to add meaning to people's lives." UNWTO White Paper (2005)

    "Customers have more time and more money. They are more discerning, better educated and more knowledgeable, and they are looking for life-enriching experiences. And they want the best value for money they can find." Rob Franklin, ETC's Executive Director

    The Experience business is driven by that memorable relationship. Take nothing for granted. Invest in all your Ambassadors, optimize their behaviors, create a standard of excellence, and become distinctive. John R. Hendrie is CEO, Hospitality Performance, Inc.

  • Tourism Today

  • ContentsRapporteur PresentationWelcome to The New World OrderInnovating for the New World OrderConclusions of WECSummary of the Sessions10 Main MessagesThe Conference ChallengeCreating the VisionSolidifying the Strategic PillarsStakeholder Implementation ModelsVientiane Declaration

  • It is my understanding that true ecotourism is a type of tourism that equitably involves and benefits local people, the environment and a range of stakeholders from the public and private sector

    Bouasone BouphavanhPrime Ministry of the Lao PDR

  • New Paradigms and Resilience for Sustainable and Responsible Tourismin Developing Countries

    Mr Eugenio Yunis - Director, Programme and Coordination, UNWTO Prof Dr Trevor Sofield - Foundation Professor and Chair, Tourism Programme University of Tasmania, Australia Mr Jose Ma Lorenzo (Lory) Tan - Vice-President, WWF, Philippines

  • Day OneQuebec Declaration on Ecotourism (2002) and the Oslo Statement on Ecotourism (2007);Regulatory mechanisms;Euro-centrism;Social ecological systems;Theres an elephant in the room;

  • Session 1 - Sustainable Ecotourism & RoadmapsProfessor Dr Zadok S Lempert - Sustainability, Tourism & Social Development Management Specialist - Roadmap Basics for Sustainability Tourism YM Datuk Seri Tengku Zainal Adlin bin Tengku Mahamood - Chairman, Sabah Tourism Board, Malaysia - Sustainable Tourism Plan for Sabah - How to make it all work?Mr Tony Charters - Vice Chair of The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) and Principal, Tony Charters & Associates, Australia - Climate Change Response Back to the Future?Mr Les Clark - Director, Tourism Resource Consultants Ltd, New Zealand - Development Perspectives: Lessons & Interventions

  • Day Two Session 1Sustainable Ecotourism and RoadmapsAnatomy of sustainability and tourism;The intricacies of Sabah tourism;The driving forces behind ecotourism (ten facts, eg. word of mouse);Ecotourism is not a better style of tourism, but rather a process;

  • Session 2 - Market Development& ResilienceDr Mark Hampton - Director Centre of Tourism in Islands and Coastal Areas (CENTICA) Kent Business School University of Kent at Medway, United Kingdom - Responsible Backpacker Tourism: contradiction or contribution? Dr Peter Richter - Principal Adviser/Project Manager, German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), Philippines - Regional Tourism Branding; The Road to "Equator Asia Dato Amiruddin Abu - Acting Director-General, Tourism Malaysia, Malaysia

    Mr Shahram Saber - Regional Director - Asia, Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), Thailand - Education in SustainabilityMr. Soukaseum Bodhisane - Vice Chairman, Lao National Tourism Administration (LNTA), Lao PDR

  • Day Two Session 2Market Development and ResilienceThe backpacker value chain (ALOS, etc);The birth of a brand Equator Asia;Malaysia truly ecotourism;Better measurement and value centered metrics;Human capital for competiveness Ecotourism is the basis of the Lao PDR tourism DNA.

  • Session 3 - Local Community Challenges & SolutionsProf Dr Amran Hamzah - Head of Tourism Planning & Research Group, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia - Community Based Tourism: Trapped Along The Value ChainMr Masaru Takayama - Executive Director, Japan Ecolodge Association, Japan - Revitalizing Rural Areas: Green and Blue Tourism with hints of sustainabilityMr Rabi Jung Panday - Director Nepalese Tourism Research & Service Centre (NTRSC), Kathmandu, Nepal - Rural Tourism: An affirmative management approach for inclusive economic growthMs Tara Gujadhur - Network Leader, Pro-Poor Sustainable Tourism, SNV Asia & Director of Traditional Arts and Ethnology Centre (TAEC), Luang Prabang, Lao PDR - Creating opportunities for communities through market-driven tourism

  • Day Two Session 3Local Community Challenges and SolutionsTourism is a business and profit is not evil;Rural tourism development is about bridging gaps;The nuances of Community Based Tourism (taking responsibility);Japanese green and blue tourism;

  • Session 4 - Public & Private Sector PartnershipsMr Albert Teo - Managing Director, Borneo Eco Tours Sdn Bhd, Malaysia - Engaging The Public Sector: The Sukau Rainforest Lodge ExperienceMr Steven Schipani - Senior Advisor, Lao National Tourism Administration (LNTA), Lao PDR - Indigenous Communities & Public Sector Partnerships: A Lao PerspectiveDr Sasithara Pichaichannarong - Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism and Sports, Thailand - Public and Private Alliance to boost Thailand Eco Tourism

  • Day Two Session 4Public and Private Sector PartnershipsCrisis and resilience in Thai tourism;Problems of fragmentation and the honest broker;Six types of capital (Jeffrey Sachs) and the need for leadership and partnership.

  • How to Calculate the Value of Tourism?Number of ArrivalsLength of StayPer Diem ExpenditurexxRevenue from Tourism=Other Social, Economic and Environmental Factors+=Total Value of TourismMain Message 1Measuring Success

  • Main Message 2Understanding the Tourism SystemDESTINATION- SUPPLY SIDEFRONT LINE SECTORBIO-PHYSICALENVIRONMENTGOVERNMENTCOMMUNITYSUPPORT SERVICES SECTORVISITOR GENERATING REGIONS DEMAND SIDEFRONT LINE SECTORCourtesy of Dr. Trevor Sofield

  • Main Message 3Understanding Process

  • The Process of Assembling the Part of a Car

  • Main Message 4 The Value Chain

  • Main Message 5Sub-Regional Cooperation

  • Main Message 6CompetitivenessSource: WEF Balancing Economic Development and Environmental Sustainability The World Economic Forum Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index14 Pillars

  • Main Message 7 Responsible Tourists

  • Main Message 8Coordination of Stakeholders

  • Main Message 9 Emerging Opportunities

  • Travel IndustryTravelersLocal communitySocial and CulturalEnvironmentEconomicMain Message 10 The Triple Bottom Line

  • ContentsRapporteur PresentationWelcome to The New World OrderInnovating for the New World OrderConclusions of WECSummary of the Sessions10 Main MessagesThe Conference ChallengeCreating the VisionSolidifying the Strategic PillarsStakeholder Implementation ModelsVientiane Declaration

  • ?

  • Towards a More Sustainable FutureIncrease Usage of Renewable Energy (clean energy)Reduce Usage of Fossil Fuels (dirty energy)Compete by Out-Greening the CompetitionChina to slow down and commit to reducing consumption (and developing world to follow suit)America to gain the political will to stand up to special interest and commit to a legal framework for the creation of a market for renewable energyDevelopment of a market for carbon credits and other mechanisms of energy trade

  • A VisionMainstreaming ecotourism s sustainable principles, processes and practices into all tourism to meet the challenges of the Energy-Climate Era

  • Development ObjectiveEcotourism for poverty alleviation, economic growth and employment opportunities.

  • DefinitionPrinciples are based on value systems that are culturally determined and ecotourism in this context has a particular responsibility to express localisation and difference.

  • Agreeing on the SectorsGovernmentIndustryEducation ProvidersIndustry Bodies and AssociationsCommunityNGOs and DonorsOther

  • Solidifying the Strategic PillarsCommit to improved synergies to meet the challenges of the emerging new world order of the energy-climate era;Improve the system of measurements to better understand the true cost/value of tourism.Strengthen human resources in hospitality and tourism through education and training.Principles are based on value systems that are culturally determined and ecotourism in this context has a particular responsibility to express localisation and difference.

  • ContentsRapporteur PresentationWelcome to The New World OrderInnovating for the New World OrderConclusions of WECSummary of the Sessions10 Main MessagesThe Conference ChallengeCreating the VisionSolidifying the Strategic PillarsStakeholder Implementation ModelsVientiane Declaration

  • The Vientiane DeclarationSimple and Straight ForwardEasy to Read (one page)A Living Document

  • The Vientiane DeclarationVientiane Declaration on Ecotourism in Developing Countries With the support of the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the Pacific Asia Tourism Association (PATA) and The International Ecotourism Society (TIES), over 300 participants comprising the public, private and non-governmental sectors from 30 countries met at the World Ecotourism Conference 2009, hosted by Lao National Tourism Administration in Vientiane, Lao PDR between 15 and 17 July 2009.

    The participants of the World Ecotourism Conference, comprising representatives from national and local governments including the tourism, environment and other administrations, private ecotourism businesses and their trade associations, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and consultants, intergovernmental organizations, and indigenous and local communities:

    Reaffirming the International Year of Ecotourism 2002, the World Ecotourism Summit 2002 and the Quebec Declaration on Ecotourism 2002 as agreed by all parties attending the Su...

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