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What is Poetry?. Poetry is hard to define. Many poets have tried to define poetry in their own ways:

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Text of What is Poetry?. Poetry is hard to define. Many poets have tried to define poetry in their own ways:

  • Slide 1
  • What is Poetry?
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  • Poetry is hard to define. Many poets have tried to define poetry in their own ways:
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  • Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words. (Edgar Allan Poe)
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  • Poetry is a deal of joy and pain and wonder, with a dash of the dictionary. (Khalil Gibran)
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  • Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance. (Carl Sandburg)
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  • Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words. (Robert Frost)
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  • Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. (T.S. Eliot)
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  • Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash. (Leonard Cohen)
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  • What is Remembrance Day? Known by several names, it is a memorial day observed in many countries to remember the members of their armed forces who have died on duty since World War I. The poppies have become a symbol of this day. What do you think they symbolize?
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  • Poetry Practice! In Flanders Fields ~ John McCrae Written during WWI, it is one of the most famous poems written in English during this time. It is believed to have been written after the Canadian doctor John McCrae saw his friend die during the fighting. The poppies referred to in the poem grew in large amounts in Flanders on the ground of the battlefields and cemeteries where war dead were buried, and so became a symbol of Remembrance Day.
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  • In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.
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  • Questions: What is this poem about? What is the tone of the poem? List 2 examples of rhyme in the poem. Give an example of imagery. Describe why it is effective.
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  • Dust of Snow ~ Robert Frost The way a crow Shook down on me The dust of snow From a hemlock tree. Has given my heart A change of mood And saved some part Of a day I had rued. What rhyme pattern does this poem use?
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  • Rhyme Pattern: The way a crow (A) Shook down on me (B) The dust of snow (A) From a hemlock tree. (B) Has given my heart (C) A change of mood (D) And saved some part (C) Of a day I had rued. (D)
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  • The Crocodile ~ Lewis Carroll How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale. How cheerfully he seems to grin! How neatly spread his claws. And welcomes little fishes in, With gently smiling jaws!
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  • Fog ~ Carl Sandburg The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over the harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. 1. What two things are being compared? 2. What imagery is used?
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  • Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveller, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, The Road Not Taken And both that morning equally lay Robert Frost In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference.