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__________________________________________________________________ ____ White Mansions A tale from the American Civil War 1861-1865 __________________________________________________________________ ____ What is it? A concept album (1978 release: A&M LP 6004) of songs, accompanied by a

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______________________________________________________________________

White Mansions

A tale from the American Civil War 1861-1865

______________________________________________________________________

What is it?

A concept album (1978 release: A&M LP 6004) of songs, accompanied by a

booklet, that tells a story that takes place during the American Civil War.

Browsing the booklet, you can read passages, view pictures, and follow the lyrics and

storyline while listening to the songs. The "original idea" and all songs written/composed by

Paul Kennerley (except the song "White Trash" - Bernie Leadon & Paul

Kennerley).

The Ozark Mountain Daredevils did not write any of the songs,

but John Dillon and Steve Cash did play and sing on the album.

______________________________________________________________________

The Story

A tale from the American Civil War 1861-1865.

White Mansions is a portrayal of life in the Confederate States of America 1861-1865.

The high hopes and deep sorrows of the Southern People are reflected in the experiences

of the four characters whose combined words tell the tale of the American Civil War.

______________________________________________________________________

The Characters

MATTHEW J. FULLER, played by John Dillon,

is the 23 year old son of a wealthy Georgian cotton planter and is typical of

the young aristocracy of the South. Brought up on a large plantation worked

by four hundred slaves, he attended both college and military academy

and is dedicated to preserving the grand lifestyle of Old Dixie.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, he joins a Georgia infantry

regiment of the Confederate States Army as a Captain.

POLLY ANN STAFFORD, played by Jessi Colter,

is Matthew's beautiful sweetheart and lives an equally opulent life as the daughter

of a neighboring land owner and diplomat. Shortly after the start of the war, she serves the cause

by working in a disease-ridden hospital attending to the many wounded and dying soldiers.

CALEB STONE, played by Steve Cash,

epitomizes "white trash," a class of poor southern whites who have no profession,

land or property. He finds work whenever he can as an overseer keeping order

among the Negro field hands. Caleb resents the power and status of the plantation

owners whose wealth emphasizes his own poverty, but in spite of this,

he feels a deep loyalty to the South. He joins the fight even if it is just to

preserve his only heritage, his superiority over the blacks.

THE DRIFTER, played by Waylon Jennings,

acts as the narrator of this story. Descended from good southern stock, he has

been unable to settle since being wounded fighting for Texas in the Mexican war.

He now leads a lonely life roaming from town to town. Not involved in the actual fighting,

the Drifter views both sides clearly and says his piece with gentle strength and worldly wisdom.

THE SLAVES have very little to say in this tell of the war,

as indeed they did in reality. Much was talked of them and in the

end, the war was fought because of them. But, despite the fact that they

represented over a third of the population of the South, their voice was seldom heard.

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The Songs

Polly has a premonition in which she sees the collapse and destruction of the "Old South" reflected in the face of a white haired gentleman planter. Her song acts as a preface to the

story.

Story To Tell - Polly (Jessi) (lyrics) (chords)

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At first, the drifter warns of the pressures on the South from the "civilized" North. Then, realizing the

severity of a move to split the United States into two totally separate commonwealths, which would

have destroyed the strength of America, he advises caution and debate. But finally, his good sense

withers under the strain of his Southern spirit and in the final verse he offers up "fighting talk."

Dixie, Hold On - The Drifter (Waylon) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

Matthew, like the majority of young men at the time, is caught up in the wave of excitement that sweeps the South

following the bombardment and surrender of Fort Sumter, the last remaining Union Army post in the newly formed

Confederacy. He exudes enthusiasm for his "new country" and its President Jefferson Davis and urges everyone

to join in the bold adventure and support the secession of the Southern states from the Union.

Join Around The Flag - Matthew (John) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

Enter the "redneck" Caleb. Like the majority of "white trash," Caleb lived little better than the slaves and have been contemptuously

tolerated and frowned on by the middle and upper classes - until now, when they needed him to fight. In the first days of the war, Caleb is quick

to join Colonel J. Hood's 4th Texas Volunteers and will soon be serving at such battles as Gaines' Mill, Manassas, Gettysburg and Chickamauga.

White Trash - Caleb (Steve) (lyrics) (chords)

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At a farewell ball in his father's fine home beneath the flow of the Parisian chandeliers, Matthew and Polly

say goodbye to each other before he rides off to join General Beauregard's army in Virginia.

The Last Dance & The Kentucky Racehorse - Matthew (John) & Polly (Jessi)

(lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

The War is on and Caleb relates the initial success of the Confederacy in the opening year and reflects the general overconfident

feeling in the South, that victory would soon be theirs. However, this was to last as long as it would take the Union

to organize its superior numbers of men, money, and armaments into a proper trained and powerful army.

Southern Boys - Caleb (Steve) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

The "amateurish" approach to war that had at first prevailed on both sides was now giving way to the bitter relentless fighting on

such shell-rutted battlefields as Gaines' Mill, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Like the Drifter, many people were beginning

to grasp the terrible horror of what was happening and they were starting to regret their initial desire to fight their political

arguments with weapons rather than continue with words. What they had started was not to end for another three bloody years.

The Union Mare & The Confederate Grey - The Drifter (Waylon) & Polly (Jessi)

(lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

In a letter to Polly, Matthew now disillusioned and uncertain of a Confederate victory, writes of the woes of war.

Robert Lee's loss to General Meade's Union army at the battle of Gettysburg (the climax of Lee's drive into the heart of the North)

was catastrophic. Not only did Lee lose 28,063 men (one third of the army), but all hopes of support for the Confederacy from the

governments of Britain and France are finally dashed - the tide has turned.

No One Would Believe A Summer Could Be So Cold - Matthew (John)

(lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

The Drifter realizes that although Lee is still winning some battles, the very fabric of the South is crumbling under the strain.

Old fashioned plantation owners could not administrate or supply a country at war, nor did they have the means by which to do so.

The pride of the South, J. E. B. Stuart's cavalry had been smashed, the Shenandoah Valley had been devastated by Sheridan and soon Atlanta was

to fall, followed by the demise of General Hood's entire army at Nashville. The desertion rate was shocking, and Grant would not exchange prisoners

which severely threatened the South's depleted manpower. This failure to do so produced atrocious situations such as that at Andersonville Prison

in Georgia where 14,000 Union prisoners died of malnutrition and disease, partly through horrible mismanagement, and partly due to lack of

food and medical supplies available in the Confederacy. It was time to quit, but foolishly they would not until April of the following year.

The Southland's Bleeding - The Drifter (Waylon) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

By March 1865, the Armies of the South were shattered. Badly armed, poorly provisioned and undermanned, Lee's bedraggled forces

were smashed as Grant tore through them at Petersburg, Virginia. Richmond, the Confederate capital, and Petersburg were abandoned (as was Atlanta, Georgia) by the fleeing Southerners, and the exhausted Army of Northern Virginia under Lee was foiled in its escape to North Carolina by General Sheridan at Sayler's

Creek.

Meanwhile, further south, Union General Sherman had outwitted General Hood and had mercilessly driven through Georgia and South Carolina bringing Dixie to

its knees. Lee saw that there was no hope for his starving and depleted army and so, on April 19th, he surrendered to Ulysses Grant at the Virginia village of Appomattox Court

House. The total collapse of the Confederacy rapidly followed with General Johnston's

surrender to Sherman and the capture of Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederate States.

Prior to the surrender we find the exhausted Matthew hopelessly ordering up twelve pound artillery that no longer exists, in a vain attempt to hold on.

Matthew is replied to by the ghosts of the Confederate dead. The war had come to and end, but the cost was still to be counted.

Bring Up The Twelve Pounders - Matthew (John) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

When Caleb, Matthew, and the Drifter return to their homes in the South after the surrender, they see the devastation that was brought to Georgia a few months before the end of the war by Sherman's March to the Sea. This was a move

designed to knock the wind out of the South and was enforced with unnecessary relish.

On April 14th, 1865, Abraham Lincoln was tragically assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, a Southern fanatic. Lincoln's death was a great loss

to the defeated Confederacy because he had planned the reconstruction of the Union with "malice toward none" and "charity for all."

They Laid Waste To Our Land - Caleb (Steve), Matthew (John), & The Drifter (Waylon) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

Lincoln freed the slaves in his proclamation of January 1, 1863. Of course, this was ignored by the Confederacy and only made them fight

still more fiercely because emancipation meant the economic destruction of a society based on cotton production. It did, however, spur the North on with

the feeling of a moral crusade. In the end, when the Negro slaves were set free at the end of the war, they were disillusioned. Some loyalty stayed with their

former masters but most of the 3,500,000 left the plantations, many of the heading for the haven of the North. Agricultural production and property

values were halved by this exodus and poverty and hunger became widespread in the South.

In setting about the reconstruction, U.S. President Andrew Johnson gave each former Confederate State a new governor charged to call a convention

to disband slavery and secession, made up of Southerners who had quickly pledged allegiance to the Union. They elected State Governments who

passed "Black Codes" which gave certain rights to Negroes regarding education and property, but not the right to vote. The free slaves were given very

poor jobs and most certainly were still not treated as equals. For the most part, these unfortunate people were, in fact, no better off and in many

cases their conditions were worse because they were no longer fed and cared for by their old masters. Thousands lived as virtual "slaves" in the Northern

factories and no real effort was made to integrate them with the whites. But bondage is the most odious state for a human being to be in,

and however rocky the road at the beginning of freedom, it was a completely worthwhile journey. Obviously, the

"great jubilee of the unshackling of the chains" was met with tremendous joy by these Southern Negroes.

Praise The Lord - The Slaves (lyrics) (chords)

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Sickened by the sights he has seen and his own callous attitude to life, Caleb finds solace from the scriptures. Although he came from the humblest of backgrounds, the Bible was to be found in his home. Indeed his mother often read it to him as a

child and whatever lessons he had picked up from it would have been the closest he came to any formal education. Now he finds a new interest in the

teachings of the Lord, and goes from town to town preaching "fire and brimstone" sermons - It is possible, however, that his taking up "the cloth" has not necessarily

cured him of his drinking habits.

The King Has Called Me Home - Caleb (Steve) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

When Matthew returns to Georgia after the surrender he finds that nothing of his former life remains. His fine plantation home has been razed

to the ground, those members of his family that are still alive have fled to avoid persecution, but worst of all, his darling Polly has died,

the victim of an epidemic disease which killed thousands. Matthew is shattered.

Around him, Dixie is in hopeless turmoil. Poverty and sickness are rife amongst the Southerners. The State governments set up by President Johnson

have been disbanded by Congress and replaced by a Military Government and Army of Occupation. Greed and corruption are abundant in people with official

positions, and Northerners vindictively humble the "rebels." Carpetbaggers exploit those who due to privation, excessive taxation and general misfortune

have to sell their property, land, and valuables at a pittance.

It was for for men like Matthew, who had lived a "privileged" life, to accept and harder still since many of them had

nothing left to lose. The laws were often unfair - Mathew driven by a deep hate chooses to live outside of them.

Bad Man - Matthew (John) (lyrics) (chords)

__________________________________

The Drifter concludes, the story is over.

Dixie, Now You're Done - The Drifter (Waylon) (lyrics) (chords)

______________________________________________________________________

The Musicians

Henry Spinetti Drums

Dave Markee Bass Guitar, String Double Bass

Steve Cash Harmonica, Lead & Backing Vocals

John Dillon Acoustic Guitar, Piano, Electric Piano, Dulcimer, Fiddle, Lead & Backing Vocals

Bernie Leadon Acoustic & Electric Guitars, Banjo, Mandolin, Dobro, Pedal Steel Guitar, Backing

Vocals

Waylon Jennings Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Lead Vocals

Jessi Colter Lead & Backing Vocals

___________________

Guest Artists

Tim Hinkley Piano, Organ

Eric Clapton Electric Slide Guitar, Dobro

Paul Kennerley Backing Vocals

Rodena Preston's "Voices of Deliverance" as The Slaves

Brian Rogers All String Arrangements

______________________________________________________________________

Note:

The "White Mansions" LP and "The Legend of Jesse James" LP (A&M Records, 1980) were released

in 1999 as a double CD, "Confederate Tales", available at Barnes & Noble and other vendors.

You also may find the CD or the vinyl of "White Mansions" at ebay.

______________________________________________________________________

Steve sez.....

I highly recommend "White Mansions" to anyone - especially if they like the earlier music of the

Ozark Mountain Daredevils. The songs, vocals, musicianship, and 'sound' are all outstanding.

The orchestral strings in the music really add to the overall fullness of the recording. And of course, the story is touching.

Get the album so that you can have the biggie-sized booklet and the better sound - ya just can't go wrong with this one!

______________________________________________________________________

Label: Mercury Nashville Original Release Date: 1978

Recording Mode: Stereo Engineer: Glyn Johns

Recording Type: Studio Distributor: Universal Distribution

____________________________________________________________________________

Much of the text on this page was copied from the album jacket and the inserts without permission.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Story To Tell (Preface)

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

Lyrics sung by Polly (Jessi Colter) __________________________________________________________________

there is a tear, old man

on your face and your hands are shaking

is it fear, old man

or just a trace of hatred awakening?

you've a story to tell

and you tell it so well

but the story is not in the lines on a page,

the story is in the lines on your face

this is the world, old man

for which your worked and loved with passion

a cultured pearl, old man

that your heart and hands helped to fashion

they want to change your way of life

a life you thought was right

all you've held dear since birth, they'll rearrange

but I don't think you're going to live to see the change

(ORCHESTRAL ENDING)

C G D (INTRO) D there is a tear, old man C G A on your face and your hands are shaking D is it fear, old man C G A or just a trace of hatred awakening? G A you've a story to tell D G and you tell it so well A D but the story is not in the lines on a page, C G D the story is in the lines on your face this is the world, old man C G A for which your worked and loved with passion D a cultured pearl, old man C G A that your heart and hands helped to fashion

G A they want to change your way of life D G a life you thought was right A D all you've held dear since birth, they'll rearrange C G D but I don't think you're going to live to see the change C G D (repeat) (ORCHESTRAL ENDING)

Dixie, Hold On

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by The Drifter (Waylon Jennings) ____________________________________________________________________________________

oh Dixie, watch this black cloud roll

she's coming down to tear away your soul

how much longer can you pretend

that your plough ain't threatened by their pen

hold on - oh, oh, oh Dixie hold on

to stand alone and cut America in two

means everything's lost, the constitution's fallen through

to leave the Union is to weaken what is strong

you think it right, they think it morally wrong

but you'll fall - oh, oh, oh Dixie you'll fall

King Cotton, your reign is shadowed with pain

and burning emotion

you need slaves to keep alive

but the North could help you survive

your misguided notion

(GUITARS & HARP)

oh, oh Dixie, you are bold and strong

you could have 'em beat before too long

you have a birthright, a lifestyle to defend

you must hold on, until the very end

hold on - oh, oh, oh Dixie, hold on

G (INTRO) G F oh Dixie, watch this black cloud roll C she's coming down to tear away your soul G F how much longer can you pretend C that your plough ain't threatened by their pen G Am C G hold on - oh, oh, oh Dixie hold on G F to stand alone and cut America in two C means everything's lost, the constitution's fallen

through G F to leave the Union is to weaken what is strong C you think it right, they think it morally wrong G Am C G but you'll fall - oh, oh, oh Dixie you'll fall Am D King Cotton, your reign is shadowed with pain G and burning emotion Am D you need slaves to keep alive but the North could help you survive G your misguided notion (GUITARS & HARP) G F C G F C G Am C G G F oh, oh Dixie, you are bold and strong C you could have 'em beat before too long G F you have a birthright, a lifestyle to defend C you must hold on, until the very end

G Am C G hold on - oh, oh, oh Dixie, hold on Am C G

Join Around The Flag

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Matthew (John Dillon) ____________________________________________________________________________________

the State's called its sons to its side, boys

they're hoisting up the 'Stars and the Bars'

we must all prepare to fight

for a cause we feel is right

and join Jeff Davis from near and far

they can't understand our way of life boys

they don't want slaves in the new territories

the knowledge that they lack

is there's no cotton if there's no blacks

and that gives us the reason to secede

come out of the meadows and plantations

come away from the shores down by the sea

join under the flag

with your musket and your bag

we got to break ties with the North to be free

since Abe got elected there ain't no choice, boys

we showed 'em what we meant when Sumter fell

and if they to try to take us back

or come and free the blacks

the good Lord knows we're going to give 'em hell

come out of the meadows and plantations

come away from the shores down by the sea

join under the flag

with your musket and your bag

we got to break ties with the North to be free

come out of the meadows and plantations

come away from the shores down by the sea

join under the flag

with your musket and your bag

we got to break ties with the North to be free

(spoken)

hell, I never did like them Yankees anyhow

always looking down their noses at us, like

they were something special

goddammit, this thing'll be over in ten weeks time anyhow

we're going to whip their ass, show 'em we can live on our own

A (INTRO) E A

the State's called its sons to its side, boys E A they're hoisting up the 'Stars and the Bars' A E we must all prepare to fight A D for a cause we feel is right A E A and join Jeff Davis from near and far A E A

they can't understand our way of life boys E A they don't want slaves in the new territories E the knowledge that they lack A D is there's no cotton if there's no blacks A E A a a b c# and that gives us the reason to secede D A

come out of the meadows and plantations D A come away from the shores down by the sea

E join under the flag A D with your musket and your bag A E A we got to break ties with the North to be free A E A

since Abe got elected there ain't no choice, boys E A we showed 'em what we meant when Sumter fell A E and if they to try to take us back A D or come and free the blacks A E A a a b c#

the good Lord knows we're going to give 'em hell D A

come out of the meadows and plantations D A come away from the shores down by the sea E join under the flag A D with your musket and your bag A E A a g f# e we got to break ties with the North to be free D A

come out of the meadows and plantations

D A come away from the shores down by the sea E join under the flag A D with your musket and your bag A E A we got to break ties with the North to be free

A

(spoken)

hell, I never did like them Yankees anyhow

always looking down their noses at us, like they were something special

goddammit, this thing'll be over in ten weeks time anyhow

we're going to whip their ass, show 'em we can live on our own

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIPS:

a b c# are single notes that are played (string/fret): 5/0, 5/2, 5/4.

a g f# e are single notes that are played (string/fret): 5/0, 6/3, 6/2, 6/0.

White Trash

(Paul Kennerley & Bernie Leadon) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Caleb (Steve Cash) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(SLIDE GUITAR INTRO)

you heard how the South is said to be graceful

white mansions, live oaks and velvet lawns

the ladies and the gentlemen dress most tasteful

'course it jest depends into whose hands you was born

they call me white trash 'cause my hair hangs long

my ragged pants got no buttons on

my teeth are black and my shoulders sag

but I fly - the Confederate flag

I bin told there's a war that's about to begin

it's going' to get meaner than a Texas high wind

so come on Caleb, you're a man to join in

when you're fighting Yankees - a redneck's a man's best friend

(SLIDE GUITAR SOLO)

well, I drink lots of corn and I know where to find my sugar

but I guess I'll volunteer for the war against the blue

'cause there ain't nothing down here to do that's much better

I'll break some blue belly bones before this thing is through

they call me white trash but I'm a fighting man

I'll sure do the best I can

I may be bad and have a foul mouth

but I'm ready - to defend the South

(spoken)

I'll show 'em what white trash is

come and get it

come on and get it

I said come and get yours

come on

come and get yours now

(SLIDE GUITAR SOLO)

A (SLIDE GUITAR INTRO) E you heard how the South is said to be graceful D B white mansions, live oaks and velvet lawns A E

the ladies and the gentlemen dress most tasteful G D E 'course it jest depends into whose hands you was born A D they call me white trash 'cause my hair hangs long A D my ragged pants got no buttons on A D my teeth are black and my shoulders sag D Dsus4 D Dsus4 A but I fly - the Confederate flag F#m B I bin told there's a war that's about to begin F#m B it's going' to get meaner than a Texas high wind F#m B so come on Caleb, you're a man to join in E when you're fighting Yankees - a redneck's a man's best friend A D (repeat 6x) (SLIDE GUITAR SOLO) A E well, I drink lots of corn and I know where to find my sugar D B but I guess I'll volunteer for the war against the blue

A E 'cause there ain't nothing down here to do that's much better G D E I'll break some blue belly bones before this thing is through A D they call me white trash but I'm a fighting man A D I'll sure do the best I can A D I may be bad and have a foul mouth D Dsus4 D Dsus4 A D but I'm ready - to defend the South A D (repeat until ending) I'll show 'em what white trash is

(SLIDE GUITAR SOLO) come and get it come on and get it I said come and get yours come on come and get yours now

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIPS:

The A chord at the beginning of the song can be played like the following.

Use your first finger to press the top four strings on the second fret and your third finger to play the note on the fifth string.

1-|| -------------------------- 2-|| -------------------------- 3-|| -2--2--2--2---2--2--2--2-- 4-|| -2--2--2--2---2--2--2--2-- 5-|| -0--0--3--0---0--0--3--0-- 6-|| --------------------------

When you see the A and D chords during the slide solos, you can play them like the following.

A D 1-|| ----------------------------------------- 2-|| -------------------------------------3--- 3-|| -2--2--2--2---2--2--2--2-------------2--- 4-|| -2--2--2--2---2--2--2--2-------------4--- 5-|| -0--0--3--0---0--0--3--0----2--3--4--0--- 6-|| -----------------------------------------

Play the D chord with your first finger pressing the strings on the second fret (just like the A chord) and place your second and third fingers down on the second and fourth strings. You can picture the D chord as this (fingers on left, frets on right):

1-|| --1---------|---- 2-|| --1--2------|-3-- 3-|| --1---------|-2-- 4-|| --1----3----|-4-- 5-|| --0---------|-0-- 6-|| ------------|----

The D and Dsus4 chords can be played as:

D 1-|| ----2-------|-2-- 2-|| -------3----|-3-- 3-|| ----1-------|-2-- 4-|| -0----------|-0-- 5-|| ------------|---- 6-|| ------------|---- Dsus4 1-|| ---(2)-4----|-3-- 2-|| -------3----|-3-- 3-|| ----1-------|-2-- 4-|| -0----------|-0-- 5-|| ------------|---- 6-|| ------------|----

In other words, from the D chord, just put your pinkie down the 1st string, 3rd fret.

The Last Dance & The Kentucky Racehorse

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Matthew (John Dillon) & Polly (Jessi Colter) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(ORCHESTRAL INTRO)

the ladies they glide, through the ballrooms they ride

with the young men hard at their heels

they know how to tease, they know how to please

but you're they only one who knows how love feels

would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends

there's no more time

would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close

just one more time

as the orchestra plays, I watch you amazed

at the grace of your step and your poise

it grieves me inside to know I'll soon ride

and leave you lost in the laughter and noise

would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends

there's no more time

would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close

just one more time

your regiment is leaving Georgia

you must join them right away

your orders are to ride to Centerville

and engage without delay

but before you turn your back on me

before you finally go

there are some things that I must give to you

some things that you should know

I'll send a Kentucky racehorse

with a rider and a prayer

to speed my words of love to you

so you'll know that I still care

I'd pay a king's ransom

and I'd live on cornbread too

just to keep your precious smile alive

and to live my life with you

for the time you'll be away from me

all the days that lie ahead

dear heart, please keep the memories

we share like we share my bed

although I won't have your helping hand

or keep your sweet company

darling when you're fighting this war

please think a little bit about me

I'll send a Kentucky racehorse

with a rider and a prayer

to speed my words of love to you

so you'll know that I still care

your carriage awaits with its horses at the gates

to take you home to your mansion so grand

where in comfort you'll stay, safe from the fray

till I return to ask for your hand

would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends

there's no more time

would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close

just one more time

would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends

there's no more time

would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close

just one more time

(ORCHESTRAL ENDING)

A D A D A E D A A E D A (ORCHESTRAL INTRO) A D A D (PIANO) A D the ladies they glide, through the ballrooms they ride A D with the young men hard at their heels A D they know how to tease, they know how to please A D but you're the only one who knows how love feels A E would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends D A there's no more time A E would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close D A

just one more time A D as the orchestra plays, I watch you amazed A D at the grace of your step and your poise A D it grieves me inside to know I'll soon ride A D and leave you lost in the laughter and noise A E would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends D A there's no more time A E would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close D A just one more time A (finger pickin')

A D your regiment is leaving Georgia A D you must join them right away A D your orders are to ride to Centerville E

and engage without delay A D but before you turn your back on me A D before you finally go A D there are some things that I must give to you E some things that you should know D I'll send a Kentucky racehorse A with a rider and a prayer A to speed my words of love to you E A so you'll know that I still care E I'd pay a king's ransom B E and I'd live on cornbread too E just to keep your precious smile alive B E and to live my life with you

A D for the time you'll be away from me A D all the days that lie ahead A D dear heart, please keep the memories E we share like we share my bed A D although I won't have your helping hand A D or keep your sweet company A D darling when you're fighting this war E please think a little bit about me D I'll send a Kentucky racehorse A with a rider and a prayer A to speed my words of love to you E A so you'll know that I still care A (PIANO)

A D your carriage awaits with its horses at the gates A D to take you home to your mansion so grand A D where in comfort you'll stay, safe from the fray A D till I return to ask for your hand A E would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends D A there's no more time A E would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close D A just one more time A E would you dance with a friend, for until this war ends D A there's no more time A E would you take this next waltz, would you hold me so close D A just one more time A D A D A D A D

A E D... (ORCHESTRAL ENDING) __________________________________________________________________

__________________

TIP:

When you see the "A (finger pickin') " chords of A and D (when Jessi sings), play the open strings as shown below before you finger-pick the chord to sound like the guitar in the recording:

A D 1-|| --------0-----0-2--- 2-|| ------0-2-------3--- 3-|| --------2-------2--- 4-|| --------2-----0-0--- 5-|| ------0-0----------- 6-|| --------------------

Southern Boys

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Caleb (Steve Cash) ____________________________________________________________________________________

they brought parasols and picnic boxes

dressed like they's hunting foxes

but could nor more fight than fly

they thought at Bull Run they'd put us down

but that ain't quite what they found

now here's the reason why

we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

they got many more men than us

got the arms but not the guts

they ain't the kind to win

we whipped 'em bad at Ball's Bluff

at Wilson's Creek - treated 'em rough

pretty soon they'll give in

we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

sweet spirit of Dixie - just drives us along

like the Mississippi flows - the Southland rolls on and on

(INSTRUMENTAL BREAK)

we got horsemen like you've never seen

gunmen that shoot so mean

farm boys with fists of steel

we've got the finest generals ever known

Jackson stands like a wall of stone

we won't beg and kneel

we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

D (Intro) D they brought parasols and picnic boxes C dressed like they's hunting foxes D G D but could nor more fight than fly D they thought at Bull Run they'd put us down C but that ain't quite what they found D G D now here's the reason why

D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

D they got many more men than us C got the arms but not the guts D G D they ain't the kind to win D we whipped 'em bad at Ball's Bluff C at Wilson's Creek - treated 'em rough

D G D pretty soon they'll give in

D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, doing well right now G A D sweet spirit of Dixie - just drives us along F C G D like the Mississippi flows - the Southland rolls on and on D C D G D D C D G D (INSTRUMENTAL BREAK)

D we got horsemen like you've never seen C gunmen that shoot so mean D G D farm boys with fists of steel D we've got the finest generals ever known C Jackson stands like a wall of stone D G D

we won't beg and kneel

D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, doing well right now

D A D C G D we're just Southern boys, raising hell right now

The Union Mare & The Confederate Grey

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by The Drifter (Waylon Jennings) & Polly (Jessi Colter) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(INTRO)

two horses were trotting, they pranced and they ran

each one was commanded by a cavalry man

two horses stood grazing where their dead riders lay

a Union mare and a Confederate grey

they nuzzled each other as they teased and had fun

they bathed in the warm rays of the old Southern sun

no more senseless orders for them to obey

so they acted like lovers, this mare and this grey

(INSTRUMENTAL)

now these are such sad times that we're all living in

for killing you brother is the mightiest sin

how happy we'd be if we acted the way

of the Union mare and the Confederate grey

(INSTRUMENTAL)

two horses were trotting, they pranced and they ran

each one was commanded by a cavalry man

two horses stood grazing where their dead riders lay

a Union mare and a Confederate grey

E

(INTRO) E A two horses were trotting, they pranced and they ran E B each one was commanded by a cavalry man E A two horses stood grazing where their dead riders lay E B E a Union mare and a Confederate grey E A

they nuzzled each other as they teased and had fun E B they bathed in the warm rays of the old Southern sun E A no more senseless orders for them to obey E B E so they acted like lovers, this mare and this grey e f# g# A D A D E A D A D E (INSTRUMENTAL) E A

now these are such sad times that we're all living in

E B for killing you brother is the mightiest sin E A how happy we'd be if we acted the way E B E of the Union mare and the Confederate grey e f# g# A D A D E A D A D E (INSTRUMENTAL)

E A two horses were trotting, they pranced and they ran E B each one was commanded by a cavalry man E A two horses stood grazing where their dead riders lay E B E A E a Union mare and a Confederate grey

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIP:

The e f# g# are single string notes and can be played (string/fret) 6/0, 6/2, 6/4.

No One Would Believe A Summer Could Be So Cold

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Matthew (John Dillon) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(RAINSTORM & MUSICAL INTRO)

I've needed you from time to time

but never as much as now

I've grabbed some love from the whores in town

but it don't satisfy somehow

I still got the letter you sent last summer

when I fell at Mechanicsville

I guess you don't know when you'll see me again

of if you ever will

it ain't easy, this living off the land

it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand

to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so damn cold

you may've heard of the cost of the Gettysburg loss

well I was there with Lee

and since Vicksburg's gone, it won't take 'em long

to capture Tennessee

sometimes I wonder if we're doing right

and if we're going to win this war

I start to forget just why we're here

and what we're fighting for

it ain't easy, living off the land

it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand

to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so damn cold

Sweet Polly, I've tried to get back to you

to be by your side - but I can't leave now

Grant's army's pushing through

(PICKIN' PIANO, & THUNDER)

they tell you stories of valour and glory

but they ain't near the fact

heroes look bad when all they had

bin eaten by the worms and rats

I hear dying men calling with gangrene crawling

through their flesh and bones

I've seen thousands pleading as they lie bleeding

ain't it time to go back home

it ain't easy, living off the land

it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand

to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so damn cold

G A C7 G G A C7 G

(THUNDERSTORM & MUSICAL INTRO) G A I've needed you from time to time C7 G but never as much as now G A I've grabbed some love from the whores in town C7 G but it don't satisfy somehow G A I still got the letter you sent last summer C7 G when I fell at Mechanicsville G A I guess you don't know when you'll see me again C7 G of if you ever will

D C G it ain't easy, this living off the land D C G it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand C G A C7 G to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so

damn cold

G A you may've heard of the cost of the Gettysburg loss C7 G well I was there with Lee G A and since Vicksburg's gone, it won't take 'em long C7 G to capture Tennessee G A sometimes I wonder if we're doing right C7 G and if we're going to win this war G A I start to forget just why we're here C7 G and what we're fighting for

D C G it ain't easy, living off the land D C G it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand C G A C7 G to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so damn cold

D G D G Sweet Polly, I've tried to get back to you D G C

to be by your side - but I can't leave now D G Grant's army's pushing through

A Bm E A A Bm D E A D (PIANO & THUNDER)

G A they tell you stories of valour and glory C7 G but they ain't near the fact G A heroes look bad when all they had C7 G bin eaten by the worms and rats G A I hear dying men calling with gangrene crawling C7 G through their flesh and bones G A I've seen thousands pleading as they lie bleeding C7 G ain't it time to go back home

D C G it ain't easy, this living off the land D C G it ain't easy, oh how I need your hand C

G A C7 G to hold - God, no one'd believe a summer could be so damn cold G A C7 G D G

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIPS:

When you see the G, A, C7, and G chords, you could play the following part to sound like the piano:

G A C7 C6 C C6 G 1-|| ------------------------------ 2-|| -0---2---1---1---1---1----0--- 3-|| -0---2---3---2---0---2----0--- 4-|| -0---2---2---2---2---2----0--- 5-|| -2---0---3---3---3---3----2--- 6-|| -3------------------------3---

If you play the C7 chord like this (fingers left, frets right):

C7 1-|| -----0-----|--0-- 2-|| -----1-----|--1-- 3-|| -----4-----|--3-- 4-|| -----2-----|--2-- 5-|| -----3-----|--3-- 6-|| -----------|-----

it makes is easier to play the C6 chord like this (fingers left, frets right):

C6 1-|| -----0-----|--0-- 2-|| -----1-----|--1-- 3-|| -----2-----|--2-- 4-|| -----2-----|--2-- 5-|| -----3-----|--3-- 6-|| -----------|-----

the key is to use your second finger to press two strings.

When you see this:

D C G it ain't easy, living off the land

The D chord goes between a D and a Dsus4: D Dsus4 D 1-|| -2----3----2---- 2-|| -3----3----3---- 3-|| -2----2----2---- 4-|| -0----0----0---- 5-|| ---------------- 6-|| ----------------

To get to the Dsus4, play a D chord and put your pinkie on the 1st string, 3rd fret.

The Southland's Bleeding

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by The Drifter (Waylon Jennings) ____________________________________________________________________________________

the Southland's bleeding

the Union's pierced the heart of Dixie

still our Generals are leading

with the courage to set us free

maybe it's time to count up all of the cost

we're just hoping there'll be some changes

wishful thinking, we're headed downhill

they only way now is surrender

but we're fighting still

you know there ain't no real chance

for us to win this

there won't be no victory dance

at the finish

it's just - Southern pride

it's just - stubborn blindness

(GUITAR SOLO)

no young man's adventure

holding on to a fading lifestyle

maybe at first

now it's terror running wild

there's no one willing to lend a helping hand

they say we're foolish and we can't blame them

let's stop this fighting while we can

it takes a brave man, but to end this killing

it takes a braver man

you know there ain't no real chance

for us to win this

there won't be no victory dance

at the finish

it's just - Southern pride

it's just - stubborn blindness

it's just - Southern pride

it's just - stubborn blindness

it's just - Southern pride

it's just - stubborn blindness

it's just - Southern pride

it's just - stubborn blindness

it's just - Southern pride

C (INTRO) C the Southland's bleeding F the Union's pierced the heart of Dixie C still our Generals are leading F with the courage to set us free C E F D maybe it's time to count up all of the cost C G we're just hoping there'll be some changes C F wishful thinking, we're headed downhill C G they only way now is surrender C but we're fighting still

Am F you know there ain't no real chance for us to win this Am F there won't be no victory dance at the finish C F it's just - Southern pride C F

it's just - stubborn blindness C F C G C (GUITAR SOLO)

C no young man's adventure F holding on to a fading lifestyle C maybe at first F now it's terror running wild C E F D there's no one willing to lend a helping hand C G they say we're foolish and we can't blame them C F let's stop this fighting while we can C G it takes a brave man, but to end this killing C it takes a braver man

Am F you know there ain't no real chance for us to win this Am F there won't be no victory dance at the finish C F it's just - Southern pride C F

it's just - stubborn blindness C F it's just - Southern pride C F it's just - stubborn blindness C F it's just - Southern pride C F it's just - stubborn blindness C F it's just - Southern pride C F it's just - stubborn blindness C F it's just - Southern pride

Bring Up The Twelve Pounders

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Matthew (John Dillon) ____________________________________________________________________________________

bring up the Twelve Pounders!

- all the horses are dead here, sir

bring 'em up by mule then

- all the mules are dead here, sir

well bring 'em up by hand, boys

- all the battery men are dead here, sir

well I need them Twelve Pounders

- there ain't no artillery left here, sir

bring up the Twelve Pounders! G - all the horses are dead here, sir bring 'em up by mule then G - all the mules are dead here, sir well bring 'em up by hand, boys G

- all the battery men are dead here, sir well I need them Twelve Pounders G - there ain't no artillery left here, sir

They Laid Waste To Our Land

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Caleb (Steve Cash), Matthew (John Dillon), & The Drifter (Waylon Jennings)

____________________________________________________________________________________

they laid waste to our land, they took it from our hand

from Atlanta to Savannah, they scorched our earth

they stole our corn and wheat, they left no food to eat

they slaughtered all the cattle, took the things of worth

well, we got women and children too

just the same as you

ain't it enough just to know that you got us beat

the hatred will never cease, even now that there's peace

the feelings will run as deep as the scars we bear

this ain't cloth we wear it's a rag, we're at the mercy of the carpetbag

what you call justice is plain unfair

how the hell can you ever claim

it's bin worth all of the pain

just to have us live together under one flag

they laid waste to our land, they took it from our hand

(the following is spoken by The Drifter during the rest of the verse)

On November 15, 1864, Gen. Sherman cut out the back of Atlanta with 68,000 hard worn Yankees, he drove 'em down through Georgia to the sea. With hate in their hearts, they moved in a line, cutting a scar through God's Blessed country 50 miles wide. Burning, looting and gutting our land like vultures. They tore up the railroad tracks, they burnt the cotton and the gins, Lord, they made everybody suffer.

(sung)

oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh

C (INTRO) C F C they laid waste to our land, they took it from our hand F C G from Atlanta to Savannah they scorched our earth C F C they stole our corn and wheat, they left no food to eat F C G they slaughtered all the cattle took the things of worth F C well, we got women and children too just the same as you G C ain't it enough just to know that you got us beat C F C the hatred will never cease, even now that there's peace F C G the feelings will run as deep as the scars we bear

C F C this ain't cloth we wear it's a rag, we're at the mercy of the carpetbag F C G what you call justice is plain unfair F how the hell can you ever claim C it's bin worth all of the pain G C just to have us live together under one flag C F C they laid waste to our land, they took it from our hand (the following is spoken by The Drifter during the rest of the verse)

On November 15, 1864, Gen. Sherman cut out the back of Atlanta with 68,000 hard worn Yankees, he drove 'em down through Georgia to the sea. With hate in their hearts, they moved in a line, cutting a scar through God's Blessed country 50 miles wide. Burning, looting and gutting our land like vultures. They tore up the railroad tracks, they burnt the cotton and the gins, Lord, they made everybody suffer.

F C G from Atlanta to Savannah they scorched our earth C F C they stole our corn and wheat, they left no food to eat F C G they slaughtered all the cattle took the things of worth F C well, we got women and children too just the same as you

G C ain't it enough just to know that you got us beat C F C F C G oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh

Praise The Lord

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Rodena Preston's "Voices of Deliverance" as The Slaves ____________________________________________________________________________________

sing praise to the Lord, I'm a free man

Massa Abe done take these chains off a me

I will walk all the way to Ohio

'cause the Lord done set me free

B B F# E B E B sing praise to the Lo-ord, I'm a free man B F# B E B Massa Abe done take these cha-ins off a me B F# B E I will walk all the wa-ay to Ohio B B F# E B 'cause the Lord done se-et me free

The King Has Called Me Home

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Caleb (Steve Cash) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(GUITAR INTRO)

I've bin living like a dog for the last four years

and the maggots bin eating at my bones

I've bin burning up my body with drinking

and I can't leave them women alone

every man gets sick deep down when he looks inside himself

so he turns toward the outside

just to disregard his hell

but I've found salvation, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

(HARP SOLO)

when the only guts and brains that you've got

are the ones that are stuck to your boot

and you're riding like hell through Virginny

just to find somebody to shoot

your start to feel disgusted about the bones you busted

and the sight of leaking spleens

well my mind got numb, so I put down my gun

and turned to the Nazarene

I've found salvation, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

I've found salvation, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home

I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

I've found salvation, the King has called me home

B (GUITAR INTRO) I've bin living like a dog for the last four years E B and the maggots bin eating at my bones I've bin burning up my body with drinking

F# B and I can't leave them women alone E B every man gets sick deep down when he looks inside himself so he turns toward the outside F# B just to disregard his hell E B but I've found salvation, the King has called me home F# B I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home E B and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home F# B I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home B E B B F# B B E B B F# B (HARP SOLO)

B (GUITAR BREAK)

when the only guts and brains that you've got E B are the ones that are stuck to your boot

and you're riding like hell through Virginny F# B just to find somebody to shoot your start to feel disgusted about the bones you busted E B and the sight of leaking spleens well my mind got numb, so I put down my gun F# B and turned to the Nazarene E B but I've found salvation, the King has called me home F# B I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home E B and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home F# B I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home Eb E B but I've found salvation, the King has called me home C# F# I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home B E B and I don't need no one now, the King has called me home F# B I know where I'm going now, the King has called me home

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIP:

I think that the guitar that plays the intro and break is tuned to an open G with a capo on the 4th fret.

I'll try to figure out these parts one of these days.

Bad Man

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by Matthew (John Dillon) ____________________________________________________________________________________

(WIND & A GALLOPING HORSE)

the poster on the wall tells me I'm a bad man

tells me I'm a mad man

tells me I'm a wanted man

the one who makes me fall will be such a glad man

five thousand dollars in his hand

makes me such a hunted man

they left me with a Navy colt

a heart that's bitter and a spirit that's broke

got to steal from the railroads, steal from the banks

take it all back from the thieving Yanks

just to keep alive

they only way I can survive

(MUSICAL BREAK)

the newspapers call me desperado

a man who lives real low

well, how the hell would they know

what it's like to come back and find

your sweetheart dead

your home destroyed and your family fled

all I want is to see blood shed

this war taught me how to kill

a man can only live by his will

put a gun in your hand, mask on your face

crawl through life, live in disgrace

try to settle the score

remember what I had before

Polly, forgive me

but you died at their hands

goin' to make them pay

take all that I can

your dying eyes

haunt my mind

going' to make them bleed

they'll pay in time

they're damned unjust

with their twisted laws

they want to take my life

but they could've saved yours

your dying eyes

haunt my mind

A D (4 times) (WIND & A GALLOPING HORSE) A G the poster on the wall tells me I'm a bad man D E tells me I'm a mad man A tells me I'm a wanted man A G the one who makes me fall will be such a glad man D E five thousand dollars in his hand A makes me such a hunted man E

they left me with a Navy colt E/G# A a heart that's bitter and a spirit that's broke E/G# got to steal from the railroads, steal from the banks A take it all back from the thieving Yanks E just to keep alive

Bm D they only way I can survive A G D E A A G D E A (ACOUSTIC GUITAR SOLO) A G

the newspapers call me desperado D E a man who lives real low A well, how the hell would they know A what it's like to come back and find G your sweetheart dead D E your home destroyed and your family fled A all I want is to see blood shed

E this war taught me how to kill E/G# A a man can only live by his will E/G# put a gun in your hand, mask on your face A crawl through life, live in disgrace E try to settle the score

Bm D remember what I had before

G D G D Polly, forgive me G D but you died at their hands G D goin' to make them pay G D take all that I can G D your dying eyes G D haunt my mind G D going' to make them bleed G D they'll pay in time G D they're damned unjust G D with their twisted laws G D they want to take my life G D but they could've saved yours G D your dying eyes

haunt my mind

____________________________________________________________________________________

TIPS:

When you see the E, E/G#, and A chords, play them with these fingerings (fingers on left, frets on right):

E 1-|| --0---------|--0-- 2-|| --0---------|--0-- 3-|| ----1-------|--1-- 4-|| ------3-----|--2-- 5-|| ------2-----|--2-- 6-|| --0---------|--0-- E/G# 1-|| --0---------|--0-- 2-|| --0---------|--0-- 3-|| ----1-------|--1-- 4-|| ------3-----|--2-- 5-|| ------2-----|--2-- 6-|| ----------4-|--4-- A 1-|| ---0--------|--0-- 2-|| ---2--------|--2-- 3-|| ---2--------|--2-- 4-|| ---2--------|--2-- 5-|| ---0--------|--0-- 6-|| ------------|-----

Yes, use your second finger to play the A chord.

Dixie, Now You're Done

(Paul Kennerley) White Mansions, 1978

____________________________________________________________________________________

Lyrics sung by The Drifter (Waylon Jennings) ____________________________________________________________________________________

oh Dixie, hang your head and cry

you have seen so many children die

you had courage and you had pride

but the Union could never see your side

at all, oh, oh, oh not at all

oh Dixie, now the land is scarred

the States are bleeding, they're wounded and marred

Mister Lincoln isn't here to lend a hand

now he's gone - and bitter hate rules the land

you're done, oh, oh, oh Dixie, you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie,

now you're done

G F

oh Dixie, hang your head and cry

C you have seen so many children die

G F

you had courage and you had pride

C but the Union could never see your side

G Am C G at all, oh, oh, oh not at all

G F oh Dixie, now the land is scarred

C

the States are bleeding, they're wounded and marred

G F Mister Lincoln isn't here to lend a hand

C now he's gone - and bitter hate rules the land

G Am C G

you're done, oh, oh, oh Dixie, you're done

G F C G oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done

G F C G

oh Dixie, oh Dixie, oh Dixie, now you're done