8
Vol. 36, No. 1 I have always believed that history is important — not because memorizing dates and names improve our quality of life, but because of the lessons history teaches us. People who know history will look at the revolutionary spirit abroad in the Middle East and hearken back to another era when revolution swept the world in 1848. Or they might recall the American Revolution, which in its turn helped spark the French Revolution. Learning about the history of America instills understanding of what it means to be an American. Knowing about the hardships that the early settlers endured to gain a foothold in the New World, and the impossible odds faced by the colonists revolting against the overwhelming might of Britain, make us value the independence that they won, and we enjoy. The contentious decision in 1812 to again declare war on Britain, the greatest naval power in the world, emerging from the fray as the United States rather than a group of states united, teaches us that our idea of this country was forged through struggle, not parliamentary debate. The long, bloody Civil War waged to keep the country united and to abolish the dehumanizing institution of slavery annealed the nation. These trials by fire are our history and our legacy. Knowing our story arms us against anyone who would rob us of these hard won civil rights and freedoms. And yet, in today’s public school classrooms, precious little time is spent learning the critical lessons of history. The No Child Left Behind legislation, designed to ensure that every child can read and compute on grade level by the year 2014, has had unintended consequences. Initially only math and reading were tested, with science a recent addition. Each year schools test students, and each year they are expected to show “Adequate Yearly Progress” (AYP). Failing Why Teach History? By Sherrod Sturrock, CMM Deputy Director Spring 2011 Continued on page 6 “We are raising a generation of children that can’t identify the symbols on the American flag.” — Social Studies Coordinator The Inaugural Conference on January 29 for the Roots of a Nation — Teaching American History initiative, with seventy teachers in attendance. The conference was held at Historic London Town near Annapolis. Photo by Chris Cerino Illustration by CMM’s Tim Scheirer of the Battle on St. Leonard Creek in 1814.

Why Teach History?

  • Upload
    others

  • View
    6

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Why Teach History?

Vol. 36, No. 1

I have always believed that history is important — not because memorizing dates and names improve our quality of life, but because of the lessons history teaches us. People who know history will look at the revolutionary spirit abroad in the Middle East and hearken back to another era when revolution swept the world in 1848. Or they might recall the American Revolution, which in its turn helped spark the French Revolution. Learning about the history of America instills understanding of what it means to be an American. Knowing about the hardships that the early settlers endured to gain a foothold in the New World, and the impossible odds faced by the colonists revolting against the overwhelming might of Britain, make us value the independence that they won, and we enjoy. The contentious decision in 1812 to again declare war on Britain, the greatest naval power in the world, emerging from the fray as the United States rather

than a group of states united, teaches us that our idea of this country was forged through struggle, not parliamentary debate. The long, bloody Civil War waged to keep the country united and to abolish the dehumanizing institution of slavery annealed the nation. These trials by fire are our history and our legacy. Knowing our story arms us against anyone who would rob us

of these hard won civil rights and freedoms. And yet, in today’s public school classrooms, precious little time is spent learning the critical lessons of history.

The No Child Left Behind legislation, designed to ensure that every child can read and compute on grade level by the year 2014, has had unintended consequences. Initially only math and reading were tested, with science a recent addition. Each year schools test students, and each year they are expected to show “Adequate Yearly Progress” (AYP). Failing

Why Teach History?By Sherrod Sturrock, CMM Deputy Director

Spring 2011

Continued on page 6

“ We are raising a generation of children that can’t identify the symbols on the American flag.”

— Social Studies Coordinator

The Inaugural Conference on January 29 for the Roots of a Nation — Teaching American History initiative, with seventy teachers in attendance. The conference was held at Historic London Town near Annapolis. Photo by Chris Cerino

Illustration by CMM’s Tim Scheirer of the Battle on St. Leonard Creek in 1814.

Page 2: Why Teach History?

2

Quarterly Newsletter of the Calvert Marine Museum

(A Division of Calvert County Government)and the

Calvert Marine Museum Society, Inc.(ISSN 0887-651X)

C. Douglass Alves Jr., DirectorSherrod Sturrock, Deputy Director

Paul L. Berry, Editor

Other contributor to this issue:Lisa Howard and Sherrod Sturrock

The bugeye was the traditional sailing craft of the Bay, and was built in all its glory at Solomons, the “Bugeye Capital of the World.” Membership dues are used to fund special museum projects, programs, and printing of this newsletter. Address comments and membership applications to:

Calvert Marine Museum Society, Inc.P.O. Box 97

Solomons, MD 20688-0097410-320-2042

FAX 410-326-6691 TDD 410-535-6355Museum Store: 410-326-2750

www.calvertmarinemuseum.com

Layout by Stuller Designs

In case you didn’t know, CMM summer camps are open for business! And the registrations are already rolling in. For rising 1st and 2nd graders we have

two exciting options: Music by the Bay taught by Jennifer Anderson is returning after a tremendously successful camp last summer. Children sing, play instruments, animate stories about animals, learn rhythms, and learn to dance like fiddler crabs. We are also bringing back the perennially popular Pirates and Scalawags. In this adventure-filled week, campers will become pirates, complete with pirate garb, eating pirate grub, and working the deck. For fun, they will hunt for hidden treasure, sing sea shanties, and sail the high seas on the “Jolly Roger” Tennison where an enemy attack is certain to take place.

If your youngster is entering grades 2-3, we’ve got the Shine on Me Lighthouse Camp. Kids in this camp will discover what life was like for lighthouse keepers and their families through stories, role playing, and 19th century children’s games. Fieldtrips

include the Drum Point Lighthouse, Cove Point Lighthouse, and Piney Point Lighthouse.

For children entering grades 3 – 4, it’s Marsh Madness time. Campers become marsh detectives as they dissect owl pellets, examine footprints, and other clues in the marsh to discover the animals that live there. Campers will take a trip into the woods at a local nature center and learn to decipher the codes of different animals.

Students entering grades 4 – 6 have two choices. Back by overwhelming demand is our infamous Shark Attack! camp. Students in this camp learn all about our ferocious friends — why they are so important to the ocean ecosystems, how they have evolved over time to be different from other fish, and why they are endangered. Campers will see living sharks at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Junior Girl Scout Badge Camp is a four-day badge camp where Girl Scouts will earn the Rocks Rock badge, along with four special badges from other councils: Lighthouse, Rollin’ Down the River, In the Mud, and the Native American Lore. Fieldtrips include trips to the Piscataway Indian Cultural Center, Cove Point, and a trip on the Wm. B. Tennison.

Students entering grades 6 – 9 also have two exciting options. Our cardboard boat camp is morphing into the Build-a-Boat Regatta! Every camper will build their very own wooden boat that they can race — and then take home. Campers learn the essentials of boat construction and navigation, and then test it all out in a furious race with nine fellow boaters. They will also learn how to handle a motorboat, operate a remote controlled

sailboat, tie knots, basic marine safety rules, navigation, and docking. The camp ends Saturday morning with the grand Boat Paddling Regatta on the banks of the Patuxent River. In our Junior Paleontologist camp participants are junior paleontologists. They hunt the best beaches for fossils. They work with our professional paleontologists to uncover the mysteries of these ancient animals and the environments in which they lived. They learn collecting techniques and how to properly preserve the specimens they find. A special fieldtrip to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History for a private behind-the-scenes tour of their amazing fossil collection promises to be a highlight of this camp.

Schedule, fees, and registration information are available on the Calvert Marine Museum web site: www.calvertmarinemuseum.com/education/education-youth-summer-camps.php. Click on Summer Exploration Camps to learn about all the camp offerings in Southern Calvert through our collaboration with Annmarie Garden, Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, and Calvert County Natural Resources. There is something for every child in your family.

CMM SUMMER CAMPS

WOODEN BOATBUILDING EXHIBIT ON MEZZANINE GALLERY

This spring, a new exhibit will be in place on the mezzanine gallery in the maritime history gallery, an exhibit developed largely from the information collected for the 2009 museum publication Boats for Work, Boats for Pleasure: the Last Era of Wooden Boatbuilding in Southern Maryland, written by curator Richard J. Dodds and registrar Robert J. Hurry. The exhibit will honor the tradition in all three Southern Maryland counties of building boats from wood, a tradition passed on from one generation to the next. It will highlight selected builders in these counties, with most of the photographs featuring those in St. Mary’s County. Boatbuilding was largely carried out in backyards and barns by carpenters, watermen, and farmers between other jobs, each boat being shaped by its intended function and the skill of the builder. The sight of boats under construction was as much a part of the landscape as tobacco hanging in barns and fishing nets drying in the sun. The exhibit will consist of photographs as well as items from the museum’s collections or on loan.

Herman W. “Bill” Dixon in his boatbuilding shop in Great Mills, St. Mary’s County, in 1983. Photo by Carl Fleischhauer , CMM, Patuxent River Folklife & Oral History project

Page 3: Why Teach History?

3SPRING 2011

MEMBERSHIP AND DEvELOPMENTMEMBERSHIP AND DEvELOPMENT

GIT-R-DONE with Larry the Cable Guy on Saturday, May 28

Get ready to laugh out loud on Saturday, May 28, as comedian Larry the Cable Guy hits the CMM outdoor stage. Come when the gates open at 6:00 p.m. and listen to live music while enjoying dinner and drinks on our waterfront grounds. Tickets are $48 and $58 (additional fees apply) and go on sale to CMM members on Tuesday, April 5, at 10:00 a.m., and on April 12 at 10:00 a.m. to the public. To buy your tickets during the members’ pre-sale, please use the password: funny.

With his signature catchphrase, “Git-R-Done,” Larry the Cable Guy is selling out theaters and arenas across the United States. Larry was part of the highly successful Blue Collar Comedy Tour. The ensemble cast of comedians included Jeff Foxworthy and Bill Engvall. The tour’s success led to Blue Collar Comedy Tour, The Movie, which premiered on Comedy Central, and at the time was the highest rated movie in the channel’s history. The sequels, Blue Collar Comedy Tour Rides Again and Blue Collar Comedy Tour, One For The Road again received some of the channel’s highest ratings ever. Larry is wrapping up taping Tooth Fairy 2 in Orlando, and currently you can catch Larry in Only in America with Larry the Cable Guy every Tuesday night at 9 EDT on the History Channel. So what are you waiting for — hurry up and order those tickets, GIT-R-DONE!

This event would not be possible without the generous support of many local businesses. Waterside 2011 sponsors include Prince Frederick Ford/Dodge; Coors, Coors Light, Killians (Bozick Distributors); All American Harley-Davidson; Quality Built Homes; Isaac’s Restaurant; The McNelis Group; DirectMail.com; 98.3 Star FM; Southern Maryland Newspapers; Bay Weekly; Quick Connections; Comcast; United Rentals; Roy Rogers-Solomons; Papa John's Pizza; Jay Worch Electric; United Rentals; and the Holiday Inn Select-Solomons.

Calvert Marine Museum hosts Willie Nelson’s Country Throwdown at the Blue Crabs’ Regency Furniture Stadium — June 18, 3–11 p.m.13 Acts on 3 stages

Tickets for Willie Nelson’s June 18 Country Throwdown Tour are on sale now. All tickets for the event will be general admission and will allow patrons access to all performances taking place throughout the event. Standing room will be available on the infield, and fans will have the ability to sit in the seating bowl as well. Tickets for the event are $40.00 each (additional service fees apply), and can be purchased on the CMM website or by calling 410-326-2042, ext. 16, 17, or 18.

Some of the performers you’ll see during this eight-hour music festival include: Willie Nelson, Jamey Johnson, Randy Houser, Lee Brice, Brantley Gilbert, Craig Campbell, Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real, and Drake White.

Exciting Members’ Trip Planned for Opening Day at Regency Furniture Stadium!

RING IN SPRING! Southern Maryland loves baseball and we love our Southern Maryland division champion Blue Crabs. Mark your calendars for Opening Day 2011 — Friday, April 29, 7:05 p.m. Calvert Marine Museum has reserved a limited number of field box seats for opening night at the reduced price of $10 per ticket. Bring your entire family for a night of fun, surprises, and, of course, baseball! In addition to reduced seating prices, you can also purchase Kids Zone armbands for $5 each, a 50 percent savings, when you purchase your opening day tickets and armbands

through CMM. Call the membership office at 410-326-2042, ext.16, to reserve your tickets today. Space is limited.

Page 4: Why Teach History?

4

Bugeye Ball…

On February 26 the Calvert Marine Museum was transformed into an exotic Monte Carlo Casino. Guests indulged in Mediterranean-inspired foods, danced to the blues, and tried their luck on the gaming tables. Thanks to our sponsors and over 360 guests we raised over $50,000 in support of the Cove Point Lighthouse.

“Shaken not Stirred”“Shaken not Stirred”An Evening of Dining, Dancing, and Adventure!

Arriving guests were treated to a vintage auto show — board member Marianne Harms poses with the Bentley. CMM photo by Bob Hall

Guests trying their luck at the roulette table. CMM photo by Bob Hall

Board chair Donald McDougall and his wife Jean. CMM photo by Bob Hall

The museum also raffled off an unforgettable trip for two to Monaco at the Bugeye Ball with the winner receiving roundtrip airfare and a seven night stay in a 5-Star Luxury Hotel. Our winner was … Nancy Wieck! Congratulations! CMM director Doug Alves and raffle winner Nancy Wieck. CMM photo by Tim Reese

Couples dancing to live music among the exhibits. CMM photo by Tim Reese

Enjoying the fine dining. CMM photo by Tim Reese

Complimentary poker chips were provided to all, and special prizes went to a lucky few: Pair of Maerten’s Fine Jewelry & Gifts

Exclusive Private Label Watches – MaryAnne McKinney

A Night to Remember Gourmet Dinner Party for Six by Caterer Ken Upton – Jenny Vodzak

The Key to the Chesapeake Necklace by Maerten’s Fine Jewelry & Gifts – Orna Tubridy Apple ipad – Dawn Wood Bose Quiet Comfort Headphones –

Len Zuza Wines of the World Basket from Port

of Call Liquors – Doug Ahearn

Page 5: Why Teach History?

5SPRING 2011

Winter 2011 — An Events SamplerThe First FREE Fridays continue to attract visitors to see the museum and enjoy the

entertainment. Friday, January 7, included a special event — a “Chesapeake Bound” concert by Teresa Whitaker, Frank Schwartz, and Mac Walter (not shown below) honoring the late “Bard of the Chesapeake,” Tom Wisner. During the month there was an exhibit in the museum lobby of “The Art of Healing the Chesapeake — A Tribute to Tom Wisner,” featuring portraits by Tom Wisner and the students whose work he inspired.

Exhibit photos by Bob Hall

On Friday, February 4, the Annapolis Bluegrass Coalition returned for its third annual appearance in the museum auditorium. CMM photo by Bob Hall

In celebration of Youth Art Month artwork by students in grades K – 12 from Calvert County schools was on display in the lobby during March. CMM photo by Sherrod Sturrock

CMM interpreter Lori Cole (at right) sings with a group of “Sea Squirts,” one of a number of activities for young visitors. This program is for toddlers ages 18 months to 3 years and their parents. CMM photo by Bob Hall

Page 6: Why Teach History?

6

to make this mark has direct implications on funding, staffing, and ultimately job security. As a result, there is less emphasis placed on teaching non-tested subjects like history, the arts, and literature. Even the national voluntary standards do not include history. In 2009, on the most recent national history test, only 47 percent of the students tested reached the “basic” level (The Economist, February 19, 2011, p.36). In Governor O’Malley’s proposed 2012 budget, the requirement for high school seniors to pass an American government test in order to graduate has been eliminated to save money — because it is not federally mandated. Teachers receive little professional development in history. In a 2010 survey taken by Sultana Projects of sixty-eight teachers (representing forty-seven individual schools in seven Eastern and Western Shore counties), an overwhelming majority, 91 percent, believe there is a need for U.S. history professional development in their district, and a similar percentage indicated that they would participate in these enrichment programs if they were offered the opportunity.

Part of the mission of the Calvert Marine Museum is the collection, preservation, research, and interpretation of the cultural history of Southern Maryland. In our maritime hall we explore the events that have transpired along the shores of the Patuxent River from the time of the Native Americans to today. Instilling a respect for our history is ingrained in our work. So, when we were given the opportunity to take an active part in improving teachers’ access to professional development in history, we jumped at the chance. The Calvert Marine Museum joined with Sultana Projects, the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, and the Center for the Environment & Society — both at Washington College — in a federally funded Teaching American History initiative entitled The Roots of a Nation — A Chesapeake Journey. This ambitious three-year program involves a consortium of seven Maryland school districts, including those in Calvert, Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s, St. Mary’s, and Talbot counties, working together to increase teacher content knowledge, improve pedagogical practices, and measurably improve student achievement in American history. Roots of a Nation will provide thirty-five master teachers with a three-year professional development program that emphasizes the use of primary documents, connects teachers to local resources, and examines innovative methods for delivering history content in the classroom. They, in turn, will share their knowledge with others in their school systems.

Using the Chesapeake Bay as a unifying theme, Roots of a Nation will explore four key periods in American history: (1) Native American history and European Settlement; (2) the Revolutionary War Period; (3) the War of 1812; and (4) Slavery and the Civil War. At the conclusion of the three-year period, each of the thirty-five teachers will have a far greater working knowledge of these periods in our history, will have visited local museums, battlefields, monuments, and historic sites related to

them, and will have had the opportunity to learn from professional historians of the periods they study. Products from this effort will include lesson plans developed by the teachers that will be disseminated throughout Maryland via a website, and printed Teacher Resource Workbooks on each historic period available to every school district in Maryland.

The Calvert Marine Museum is focusing on the War of 1812. We are inviting teachers to learn about the role of privateers in a course entitled “Pirates or Patriots.” The War of 1812 was the last conflict where privateers were legally employed as a sanctioned tactic in a war. Facing Britain’s naval might without a standing navy, President Madison “deputized” a number of private owners to harass British ships and take prizes. Our own local hero, Joshua Barney of the Chesapeake Flotilla, numbered among these adventurous patriots.

Partnering with Sotterley Plantation, teachers will explore the impact the war had on slavery. Sotterley’s owners lost many slaves during the summer of 1814 as they slipped away to join the British and thereby gain their freedom. Ongoing research has uncovered remarkable stories of these individuals — their names, backgrounds, and what happened to them after the war. Teachers will see where these individuals lived, what their lives were like, and use primary documents to research their fate. They will learn how to take those primary documents, and access to local treasures like Sotterley Plantation, into their classrooms so that their students can have a similar experience in discovery. History is much more than reading a chapter and passing a test; history is

Why Teach History? (Continued from page 1)

A War of 1812 re-enactment at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum during the Grand Tactical in 2008.

Photo by David Krankowski

Page 7: Why Teach History?

7SPRING 2011

holding real people’s lives in your hands and acknowledging the connections that we share.

At the museum we will offer a two-day course led by published historian Donald Shomette designed to help teachers understand the contextual framework of the war, the many pressures that brought this country into a conflict that they were ill prepared to fight, and the roles played by regional factions as well as the Native Americans, French, British, and Canadians. The vote to go to war in 1812 was the closest in our history, so hotly contested was it among the members of Congress. Although most Americans today know very little about the War of 1812, it was the war that forged the national consciousness, finally uniting the collection of independent states into one unified country against a common enemy. The fault line of slavery would erupt some four decades later.

Over the summer, teachers will have an opportunity to participate in a five-day intensive seminar where, working with

Dr. Ralph Eshelman, they will retrace the path the invaders took through Southern Maryland. They will see where the largest naval engagement that ever took place in Maryland was fought on St. Leonard Creek. They will walk the battlefield at Bladensburg, and then journey on to Baltimore where the British attacked Fort McHenry and the term “star spangled banner” was born. They will work with historians on original documents, hear a first-hand account from a re-enactor, visit historic sites on both land and water, and generally immerse themselves in the history of how this war affected Maryland.

And that brings us back to the subject of students ignorant about their history. We, along with our partners and the participating teachers and school systems, are taking a stand against historical illiteracy. This project will help to make a difference, not only for these teachers, but for any teacher in Maryland, and by extension their history-deprived students.

Suffolk

Pocomoke City

Snow Hill

Sharptown

LaurelCambridge

Crisfield

Salisbury

Vienna

Millsboro

Denton

Harrington

Greenwood

Bridgeville

Hurlock

Dover

Greensboro

Queen Anne

EastNew Market

Milford

Georgetown

Easton

Chesapeake City

Chestertown

Havre de Grace

Frederick

Baltimore

Westminster

Rock Hall

Chesapeake Beach

Hughesville

Waldorf

Bowling Green

Clements

Tappahannock

Kilmarnock

Urbanna

Richmond

Newport NewsSmithfield

Winsor

Portsmouth

Williamsburg

Hampton

Petersburg

Manassas

Leesburg

Accomac

Onancock

Tangier Island

Smith Island

Exmore

Belle Haven

Chincoteague

Chesapeake

Virginia Beach

95

95

95

695

695

95

95

95

95

95

70

70

85

64

64

64

295

295

64

66

270

64

664

264

795

89595

97

64

15

13

13

13

13

58

1358

113

50

301

301

13

13

13

13

40

40

40

1

301

301

1

1

360

360

17

17

313

8

300213

213

20

213

213

301

12

26

26140

97

97

340

7

267

15

28

17

2

207

3011

60

60 17

60

30

30

30

33

5

5

10

10

17

258

258

460

460

460

44

17

31

105

33

3

14

14

14

198

3

3

200

360

177

100

156

644

354

13

295

272

70695 83

189

113

113

1139

14

18

1

9

9

13

1

1

1

49

2

32

32

32

Che

sape

ake

B

ay Bridg

e Tunn

el

Passeng

er Ferry

Bay Bridge

North

0

0 5

5 10 20

10

15

15

Km

Mi

24

CHARLES

CA

LVE

RT

4

262

260

2

2/4

264

265

5235

4

2355

5

242

AT

LA

NT

IC O

CE

AN

Potomac River

Poto

mac

Rive

r

Rappahannock River

Patuxent River

Plankatank Rive

r

York River

Planka tank Riv e r

Ma t tapon i Riv e r

Pumunk e y

Ri ve r

Ma t tapon i R

i v e r

Potomac River

James River

Rappahannock River

Rappahannock River

Port Tobacco River

Nanjem

oy Creek

B

reton Bay

Co

rrotom

an

Rive

r

Yecomico River

Wrights Cove

Coa

n

Riv

er

Hul

l C

reek

Little W

icomico River

Great Wicomico River

Potomac Creek

Aquia Creek

Fleets Bay

James River

Chickahominy Riv e r

Chickaho m

iny River

Mob

jack Bay

North River

Ware River

Nan

sem

ond R

iver

Eliz

abeth

Riv

er

Cobham Bay

Herring Bay

Selby Bay

Severn River

WhitehallBay

Magothy River

Back River

Middle River

Gunpow

der River

Bus

h R

iver

SusquehannaFlats

Northe

ast

Rive

r

Elk R

iver

Sassafrass River

Chest

er River

Fishing Bay

Hooper Strait

Hollan

d Stra

it

Nan

ticok

e Rive

r

Nanticoke

R

iver

Tan

gier

Sou

nd

Pocomo

ke S

ound

Choptank River

Eastern

Bay

Honga R

iver

Cher

ryston

e Inle

t

H

unga

rs

Cr

Occohannock Cr

Nassawadox C

r

Nandua Creek

Beasly Bay

Pocomoke River

Poco

mok

e R

iver

Manokin River

Wicomico

River

Cho

ptan

k

River

Tuck

ahoe

Rive

r

Liberty Reservoir

Mon

ocac

y

R

iver

Susquehanna River

Elk

River

Littl

e C

hoptank River

Chester River

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal

Diascund Creek Reservoir

Mon

ocac

y

Riv

er

Pa tapsco R ive r

Saint Marys R

iver

Wicomico River

Sa

int C

lemen

t’s B

ay

234

5 231

6

5

6

301

225

6

301

210

5

1

95

66

193

4957

495

495

4

258

50

301

3

202

360

425

224

Nanjemoy

La Plata

2053

301

17

17

St. Leo

nard

Cre

ek

Solomons

Great Mills

249

16

335

16

50404

33331

33350

16

50 331

313

392

16

16

14

313

404

18

Federalsburg

50

349

13

363

413 13

Fredericksburg218

Port Royal

St. Mary’s City

Scotch Neck Site

Huntingtown

Lexington Park

Leonardtown

245238

Cobb Island

North Beach

Dunkirk

Prince Frederick

St. Leonard

Patuxent River

ST. MARY’S

381

Newburg

Hallowing Point

Lower Marlboro

Prince Frederick Courthouse

Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum

BenedictChapel Point

Indian Head Gun Battery Site

Lower Cedar Point

Maxwell Hall

Oldfields Chapel

PortTobacco

Chaptico

Great Mills Textile Factory Site

Patuxent River Naval Air Museum

Point LookoutState Park

St. Clement’s Island Museum

St. George Island

St. Inigoes Manor SiteSt. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church

Sotterley Plantation

Tudor Hall

Charlotte Hall

St. Jerome Creek

Cove Point

St. Clement’s IslandState Park

Calverton

GodsgracePlantation Site

Hall Creek

Huntingtown(original site)

Pt. Patience

The Reserve Site

Rousby Hall

Fort Hill Site

Sheridan Point

Taney Place

Patuxent City

Woodland Point

Carroll Plantation Site

Cedar Point

PortoBello

Coles Landing

Calvert Marine Museum

Broomes Island

Dares Beach

Holland Cliff

St. Leonard’s Town (original site)

Breton BaySt. Clement’s Bay

Warof1812DESTINATIONS

Raid or other harassment of citizens by British soldiers

Skirmish or battle where fire was exchanged

Battle between British and American troops

Mustering sites, camps, look-outs

The following symbols designate locations that are publically accessible, and where you can go to learn more about the events of 1814:

Interpretive signage on site, includes highway markers

1812 interpretation/ not an 1812 historic site

Visitor destination 1812 site with interpretation

Visitor Information Centers

Washington D.C.

North

ChesapeakeBay

This map shows the extent to which local property owners were impacted by the War of 1812.

Historic LocationsBenedict (Patuxent River) — The British landed at Benedict with a force of 4,370 and marched north, ultimately burning Washington. Interpretive signage on site.

Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum — The largest naval engagement in the history of Maryland took place where the Patuxent River meets the mouth of St. Leonard Creek and can be viewed from this site. Exhibits and interpretation on site: 10515 Mackall Road, St. Leonard, MD; www.jefpat.org

Sotterley Plantation — Sotterley was a mustering site for militia coming to the aid of the U.S. Chesapeake Flotilla in June 1814. Visitors will be able to experience and participate in a living history reenactment of these events and more at Sotterley, 44300 Sotterley Lane, Hollywood, MD; 301-373-2280; www.sotterley.org

Chaptico — British forces conducted a raid at Chaptico where many houses as well as the wharf and tobacco sheds were destroyed and the church damaged. Rt. 234, St. Mary’s County.

Leonardtown — British troops attacked Leonardtown. Interpretive signage on the Port of Leonardtown Public Park.

Lower Marlboro — A British force occupied the town June 15 to June 16, 1814. Historic marker on site, at the end of Rt. 262.

Maxwell Hall — Local tradition claims that Maxwell Hall served as a temporary headquarters for the British during their march on Washington. Historic marker on site, located near Patuxent, Charles County. www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=28317

St. Leonard — Interpretive signage about the St. Leonard Town Site and the First Battle of St. Leonard Creek from June 8 to 10, 1814, and the Second Battle of St. Leonard Creek on June 26, 1814.

St. Clement’s Island Museum/St. Clement’s Island — British forces landed on St. Clement Island and several times during 1813-14. 38370 Point Breeze Road, Colton’s Point, MD. www.co.saint-marys.md.us/recreate/stclementsisland.asp

Solomons — This island was called Somervell’s Island during War of 1812. Historic marker at the terminus of MD. Rt. 2, end of Solomons Island.

Tudor Hall (Leonardtown) — Interpretive panels on site. www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=17428

Calvert Marine Museum (Solomons) — The museum displays artifacts recovered from one of the vessels of the U.S. Chesapeake Flotilla scuttled on August 22, 1814, on the Patuxent River, as well as an electric map of the British invasion route up the river. The museum interprets the pre-history, natural environments, and maritime heritage of the Chesapeake Bay and Southern Maryland. For hours and fees, visit www.calvertmarinemuseum.com

Linden House, Prince Frederick — On July 19, 1814, the British burned the Calvert County Courthouse, the jail, and a tobacco warehouse. Interpretive signage at Linden. www.calverthistory.org

Patuxent River Naval Air Museum — [This museum plans to open an exhibit that will include information about activities that took place on land that now encompasses this military installation. These events will include the Battle of Cedar Point, and the British raids at Cedar Point, Carroll Plantation and Susquehanna. Interpretation is in planning stage.

Map Legend

Map showing sites in Southern Maryland from the War of 1812 that are publicly accessible and the events that occurred at the sites. The map is being developed by the museum and will be available later in the year.

CMM’s current exhibit on the Battle of the Patuxent during the War of 1812.

CMM photo by Rob Hurry

Page 8: Why Teach History?

8

vOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Congratulations are in order for the four volunteers nominated this year by staff for the Volunteer of the Year. Christa Conant works tirelessly in education, paleontology, and with the Patuxent Small Craft Guild — you never know where you’ll find her. Not only does she volunteer her time, but she is always ready with new ideas and suggestions for how to improve programs. Sylvia Dry is said to be MARVelous! She volunteers her time in the development office and is a crucial part of their team. She is organized, dependable, and efficient, and does everything from filing, sorting, planning, selling concert tickets, and so much more. Althea Green is very dedicated and strives to learn everything she can about the Discovery Room and the skates and rays. She spends all day every Friday volunteering in both areas. Ilse Metz can be found in the museum library three mornings each week working on the computer. She has worked

on many special projects, such as list of slides, census lists, brief indexes for several newspapers, and is now searching computer databases for newspaper articles appropriate for the museum to collect. Ilse also works behind the scenes in the paleontology department cataloging the collections at “lightning speed.”

Nominated this year for the Group Achievement Award are volunteers from the Fossil Prep Lab — Darlene Brindley, Christa Conant, Mark Edmondson, Bregan Heffentrager, Dick Hu, Kyle Jenks, Pam Platt, and Sandy Roberts. The award is for their collective skills and patience in faithfully preparing the fossils that are collected along Calvert Cliffs.

The winner of the Volunteer of the Year Award will be announced at the volunteer recognition reception event on April 14. Congratulations, and thank you to all of the nominees — you are all winners in my book!

By Sherry Reid, Volunteer/Event Coordinator

The 2010-2011 PEM Talk Series – The Calvert Cliffs Conundrum concluded in March with Dr. Doug Samson’s thorough and fascinating presentation on the Cove Point marsh. This has been a very exciting and rewarding series, bringing together concerned residents who are interested in holding open dialogue on this perplexing and complex topic. The series, sponsored by Bob and Betty Currie, ran from September through March, with each month offering a talk on a different perspective of

the Calvert Cliffs. Dr. Susan Kidwell opened the series with a talk about the geology of the cliffs. Dr. Stephen Godfrey, the museum’s talented paleontologist, followed with a talk on the paleontology of the cliffs, followed by Dr. Jeff Halka’s presentation on the current rates of erosion. Having firmly established the “ground rules,” so to speak, Dr. Ralph Eshelman spoke about the human perspective, followed by Drs. Michael Fenster and Barry Knisley

sharing their extensive knowledge of the infamous Puritan tiger beetle. The series concluded with Dr. Doug Samson’s case study of the Cove Point marsh.

One of the interesting offshoots of this series was the museum’s participation in the Facing Fences exhibit at St. Mary’s College Boyden Gallery. Using as a catalyst the traveling Smithsonian exhibit called Between Fences, which explores the ways fences unite and divide people, the Boyden Gallery invited local community organizations to consider the role of metaphorical fences in people’s lives. The resulting community contributions to the exhibit expanded the meaning of the word “fences” to include racial, sexual, generational barriers, physical boundaries, and historical relationships. Michael Godfrey created the museum’s contribution, shown here, which is a graphic

representation of the Calvert Cliffs Conundrum series. (A larger version can be seen on the museum’s website.)

PEM TALK SERIES

Nominees for the 2010 volunteer of the Year Award