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472 Selection Committee in England, in addition to con- I sidering applications from India of candidates who have I mainly received their education in England, will review those of the candidates in the United Kingdom, but not the recommendations of the India Committee in regard to candidates educated in that country. For full particulars intending candidates should applylto the Secretary, Military Department, India Office, Whitehall, London, S.W. 1. WOMEN’S MEDICAL SERVICE FOR INDIA. THIS service is open to properly qualified medical women of British or Indian nationality who desire to carry on work in India. Medical women proceeding to India to join the Women’s Medical Service receive a sufficient sum for a first-class passage to India. On landing they are posted to one of the larger women’s hospitals to gain Indian experience and to learn the language. During this period (from six months to two years) private practice is not allowed. For a further period they are appointed to act temporarily for medical women on furlough, during which time private practice is allowed. They are then definitely appointed to the charge of hospitals. Private prac- tice is always allowed after the first two years, pro- vided it does not interfere with official duties. The only exception is in administrative or educational posts, when an allowance in lieu of practice is given. The amount obtained from practice varies according to the station, but in most cases it forms a fair addition to the salary, varying from J6150 to 21000 a year. Excellent opportunities for surgery-especially gynaecological—are found in the Women’s Medical Service. To those who are not keen surgeons oppor- tunities are likely to open in the future in connexion with maternity and child welfare ; medical women with administrative ability are also needed for the inspection of women’s hospitals and other medical institutions. Rates of pay are as follows :— The above rates of pay are not so high as those of the Indian Medical Service. The fact, however, that furnished quarters are provided (these are not provided in the Indian Medical Service) represents an addi- tional Rs.150 per mensem. Moreover, the official duties of the members of the W.M.S. are lighter than those of the I.M.S. The cost of living in India is much higher than formerly, but it should be possible for a medical woman (with house provided) to meet actual household expenses for about Rs.200 per mensem, leaving the remainder of her salary for dress and personal expenses. To this must be added the necessary saving to meet additional expense for furlough and leave spent in the hills. One month’s privilege leave on full pay is granted each year. Furlough on half-pay at the rate of two months for every year of service is granted after every three years. Study-leave on two-thirds pay is granted to the extent of 12 months in the total service. There is a provident fund to which members of the service contribute 10 per cent. of their pay. The service contributes another 10 per cent. which accumulates at interest and is repaid on retirement. Admission to the service is made by selection. Can- didates in the United Kingdom should apply to the Hon. Secretary, United Kingdom Branch of the Countess of Dufferin’s Fund, care of Sir Havelock Charles, India Office, Whitehall, London. AIR FORCE MEDICAL SERVICE. THE Royal Air Force Medical Service offers a career for medical men which should prove both attractive and interesting. The rates of pay and allowances are good, and a new field of scientific interest is opened up by the manifold problems which the circumstances of aviation produce. The physical and mental fitness for, and reaction to, the varied conditions under which the flying personnel perform their functions provide much scope for research. As promotion to the higher ranks of the Service is to be entirely by selection, and as a certain proportion of the higher ranks will be reserved for purely scientific, as opposed to administrative, appointments, it will be seen that there are excellent prospects for the young medical officer who exhibits ability and energy in scientific research, as well as for those who develop a talent for administration. The establishment will consist partly of permanent and partly of short-service officers. Short-service officers will be admitted by direct entry for a period of two years, which may be extended to four years at the discretion of the Air Council on recommendation of the Director of Medical Services. Those who are not selected for permanent commissions will pass into the Royal Air Force Medical Reserve at the expiration of their period of service on the active list, and will then receive the gratuity to which their service entitles them. Short-service officers who are approved for per- manent commissions, but for whom there are not vacancies in the Royal Air Force Medical Service, may, under certain conditions, transfer to the Royal Army Medical Corps, counting their time served in the Royal Air Force towards increments of pay and retired pay in the Royal Army Medical Corps. Officers who have been selected for permanent commissions will be granted leave for a period not exceeding nine months for post-graduate study in general medicine and surgery, tropical and preventive medicine, and other special subjects. Such leave will be granted during the first six years of permanent service, and during such leave officers will remain on full pay and allowances. New entrants into the Royal Air Force Medical Service will be commissioned as Flying Officers (Medical) and will be eligible for promotion to the rank of Flight Lieutenant (Medical) after two years’ service. Officers selected for permanent commissions will be promoted to the rank of Squadron Leader after 10 years’ total service. Accelerated promotion may be carried out, in a limited number of cases, of officers who show exceptional ability after the com- pletion of eight years’ service. Promotion to the rank of Wing Commander will be by selection at any period after 16 years’ total service, and to that of Group Captain by selection at any period after 22 years’ service. There will be no competitive examination on entry; candidates must be under 28 years of age, be nominated by the Dean of a recognised medical school or teaching hospital, and will be interviewed personally by the Director of Medical Services, Royal Air Force, before acceptance. Each candidate must produce- 1. Birth certificate. 2. Medical registration certificate. 3. A declaration containing the following informa- tion :- (a) Age and place of birth. (b) That he is of pure European descent, and the son of a subject of the British Empire. (c) That he labours under no constitutional or mental disease or disability which may interfere with the efficient discharge of the duties of a medical officer in any climate in peace or war. (All candidates will be required to pass a medical examination as to their physical fitness before acceptance to ensure that they fulfil the standard laid down in this declaration.) (d) That he is ready to engage for general service at home or abroad as required. (e) The qualifications he is possessed of, and what medical or other appointments he has held (if any).

WOMEN'S MEDICAL SERVICE FOR INDIA

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Selection Committee in England, in addition to con- Isidering applications from India of candidates who have Imainly received their education in England, willreview those of the candidates in the United Kingdom,but not the recommendations of the India Committeein regard to candidates educated in that country.For full particulars intending candidates should

applylto the Secretary, Military Department, IndiaOffice, Whitehall, London, S.W. 1.

WOMEN’S MEDICAL SERVICE FOR INDIA.

THIS service is open to properly qualified medicalwomen of British or Indian nationality who desire tocarry on work in India. Medical women proceedingto India to join the Women’s Medical Service receivea sufficient sum for a first-class passage to India. Onlanding they are posted to one of the larger women’shospitals to gain Indian experience and to learn thelanguage. During this period (from six months to twoyears) private practice is not allowed. For a furtherperiod they are appointed to act temporarily formedical women on furlough, during which timeprivate practice is allowed. They are then definitelyappointed to the charge of hospitals. Private prac-tice is always allowed after the first two years, pro-vided it does not interfere with official duties. Theonly exception is in administrative or educationalposts, when an allowance in lieu of practice is given.The amount obtained from practice varies accordingto the station, but in most cases it forms a fair additionto the salary, varying from J6150 to 21000 a year.

Excellent opportunities for surgery-especiallygynaecological—are found in the Women’s MedicalService. To those who are not keen surgeons oppor-tunities are likely to open in the future in connexionwith maternity and child welfare ; medical womenwith administrative ability are also needed for theinspection of women’s hospitals and other medicalinstitutions.

Rates of pay are as follows :—

The above rates of pay are not so high as those ofthe Indian Medical Service. The fact, however, thatfurnished quarters are provided (these are not providedin the Indian Medical Service) represents an addi-tional Rs.150 per mensem. Moreover, the officialduties of the members of the W.M.S. are lighter thanthose of the I.M.S.The cost of living in India is much higher than

formerly, but it should be possible for a medicalwoman (with house provided) to meet actual householdexpenses for about Rs.200 per mensem, leaving theremainder of her salary for dress and personal expenses.To this must be added the necessary saving to meetadditional expense for furlough and leave spent inthe hills.

One month’s privilege leave on full pay is grantedeach year. Furlough on half-pay at the rate of twomonths for every year of service is granted after everythree years. Study-leave on two-thirds pay is grantedto the extent of 12 months in the total service. Thereis a provident fund to which members of the servicecontribute 10 per cent. of their pay. The servicecontributes another 10 per cent. which accumulates atinterest and is repaid on retirement.Admission to the service is made by selection. Can-

didates in the United Kingdom should apply to theHon. Secretary, United Kingdom Branch of theCountess of Dufferin’s Fund, care of Sir Havelock

Charles, India Office, Whitehall, London.

AIR FORCE MEDICAL SERVICE.

THE Royal Air Force Medical Service offers a

career for medical men which should prove bothattractive and interesting. The rates of pay andallowances are good, and a new field of scientificinterest is opened up by the manifold problems whichthe circumstances of aviation produce. The physicaland mental fitness for, and reaction to, the variedconditions under which the flying personnel performtheir functions provide much scope for research. Aspromotion to the higher ranks of the Service is to beentirely by selection, and as a certain proportion ofthe higher ranks will be reserved for purely scientific,as opposed to administrative, appointments, it will beseen that there are excellent prospects for the youngmedical officer who exhibits ability and energy inscientific research, as well as for those who develop atalent for administration.The establishment will consist partly of permanent

and partly of short-service officers. Short-serviceofficers will be admitted by direct entry for a periodof two years, which may be extended to four yearsat the discretion of the Air Council on recommendationof the Director of Medical Services. Those who arenot selected for permanent commissions will pass intothe Royal Air Force Medical Reserve at the expirationof their period of service on the active list, and willthen receive the gratuity to which their service entitlesthem.

Short-service officers who are approved for per-manent commissions, but for whom there are notvacancies in the Royal Air Force Medical Service,may, under certain conditions, transfer to the RoyalArmy Medical Corps, counting their time served inthe Royal Air Force towards increments of pay andretired pay in the Royal Army Medical Corps.

Officers who have been selected for permanentcommissions will be granted leave for a period notexceeding nine months for post-graduate study ingeneral medicine and surgery, tropical and preventivemedicine, and other special subjects. Such leavewill be granted during the first six years of permanentservice, and during such leave officers will remain onfull pay and allowances.New entrants into the Royal Air Force Medical

Service will be commissioned as Flying Officers(Medical) and will be eligible for promotion to therank of Flight Lieutenant (Medical) after two years’service. Officers selected for permanent commissionswill be promoted to the rank of Squadron Leaderafter 10 years’ total service. Accelerated promotionmay be carried out, in a limited number of cases,of officers who show exceptional ability after the com-pletion of eight years’ service. Promotion to therank of Wing Commander will be by selection at anyperiod after 16 years’ total service, and to that ofGroup Captain by selection at any period after22 years’ service.

There will be no competitive examination on entry;candidates must be under 28 years of age, be nominatedby the Dean of a recognised medical school or teachinghospital, and will be interviewed personally by theDirector of Medical Services, Royal Air Force, beforeacceptance. Each candidate must produce-

1. Birth certificate.2. Medical registration certificate.3. A declaration containing the following informa-

tion :-

(a) Age and place of birth.(b) That he is of pure European descent, and the son of

a subject of the British Empire.(c) That he labours under no constitutional or mental

disease or disability which may interfere with the efficientdischarge of the duties of a medical officer in any climatein peace or war. (All candidates will be required to pass amedical examination as to their physical fitness beforeacceptance to ensure that they fulfil the standard laid downin this declaration.)

(d) That he is ready to engage for general service at homeor abroad as required.

(e) The qualifications he is possessed of, and what medicalor other appointments he has held (if any).