Working Toward Resilient Landscapes and Communities ... ... communities need. Climate change drives

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Working Toward Resilient Landscapes and Communities ... ... communities need. Climate change drives

  • Collaborative Restoration Workshop Working Toward Resilient Landscapes and Communities

    SUMMARY Proudly hosted by the National Forest Foundation in Denver, Colorado April 26-27, 2016

  • Explore more: nationalforests.org/crw

    As is appropriate for an event focused on collaboration, a great many people worked together to shape the Collaborative Restoration Workshop.

    The National Forest Foundation is deeply grateful to the many people and organizations who worked with us to help make the Collaborative Restoration

    Workshop a successful launching point to do more impactful work for the benefit of our landscapes and communities.

    We wish to recognize the U.S. Forest Service, our fellow sponsors, the advisory and track committee members, the many speakers and moderators,

    and all of the participants for your contributions.

    Thank you!

    http://www.nationalforests.org/crw

  • Explore more: nationalforests.org/crw

    Table of Contents

    Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................................1 Plenary Sessions

    Welcome to the Workshop & What We’re Trying to Achieve .......................................................................3

    Robert Bonnie, Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment, USDA .....................................5

    Collaborative Restoration: Local Implementation of the National Vision ......................................................6

    Where Have We Come from and What Does It Mean for the Future? ........................................................8

    Understanding and Addressing Critiques of Collaboration ................................................................................10

    Future of Collaborative Stewardship ........................................................................................................................13 Planning

    Building Momentum and Planning for Restoration through Five-Year Plans ..................................................15 Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Forest Planning Under the 2012 Planning Rule: Early Lessons in Planning and Collaboration ...................17 Collaborative Process

    Innovative New Tools for Planning & Prioritization at Different Scales ..........................................................19 Modeling and GIS, Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Large-Landscape and Regional Planning ...................................................................................................................22 Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Planning & NEPA at the Project Level......................................................................................................................24

    Integrating Science & Action Collaboratively Engaging in Science ..........................................................................................................................26

    Restoration as Science in Action ...............................................................................................................................28 Adaptive Management

    Restoration Under a Future Climate .......................................................................................................................31 Adaptive Management, Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Using Science to Make Durable Collaborative Decisions ...................................................................................33 Modeling and GIS

    What’s Working, What’s Not: Integrating Science and Action .........................................................................35

    http://www.nationalforests.org/crw

  • Explore more: nationalforests.org/crw

    Collaboration & Engagement

    Problem Resolving and Preventing: Working Together Effectively ...................................................................38 Collaborative Process

    Stories from the Front Lines: Launching & Nurturing the Colorado Front Range Roundtable .................41 Collaborative Process

    Stories from the Front Lines: Launching & Nurturing the West Virginia Restoration Venture ................43 Cross-Boundary Partnership, Collaborative Partnership

    Tools to Collaborate Successfully & Build Capacity .............................................................................................45 Collaborative Process

    Unpacking Collaboration – What Time is the Right Time and What Are the Sideboards? .......................47 Collaborative Process

    Implementation

    Connecting Planning to Effective Implementation .................................................................................................50 Modeling and GIS

    Cross-Boundary Implementation: All Lands Approaches ....................................................................................52 Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Innovative Funding Mechanisms for Restoration ...................................................................................................54 Cross-Boundary Partnership

    Removing Biomass: Utilization and Market Opportunities .................................................................................56

    Using Stewardship Authority to Advance Restoration ........................................................................................59

    Monitoring

    Adaptive Management: Thinking Outside the Box ................................................................................................61 Adaptive Management

    Keys to Success: Integrating Partner and Collaborative Monitoring on Federal Lands ...............................63 Collaborative Process, Adaptive Management

    Monitoring for Resilient Ecosystems: Developing Indicators and Metrics ......................................................65 Adaptive Management

    Remote Sensing Tools for Collaborative Monitoring at Large Scales ..............................................................68 Modeling and GIS

    Socio-Economic Monitoring: Methods to Measure and Tell the Story ............................................................70

    Appendix: Collaborative Restoration Workshop Schedule .......................................................................72

    http://www.nationalforests.org/crw

  • Explore more: nationalforests.org/crw

    The Collaborative Restoration Workshop When summer fieldwork, monitoring, and project implementation on National Forest System (NFS) lands commence, partners and agency staff celebrate the final stages of restoration work. The path to on-the-ground accomplishments may have been a contentious, collaborative, or innovative one that stretched the boundaries of restoration. Yet as we witness years of planning and collaboration become reality on the ground and in waterways, the efforts are paying off. Similarly, the National Forest Foundation (NFF) celebrates the path to the first national Collaborative Restoration Workshop. Collaboration defined the yearlong process to organize the Workshop. Over the last year, the NFF organized the Workshop in partnership with staff from Forest Management of the U.S. Forest Service. Nineteen advisory committee members from non-governmental organizations and Forest Service departments – people on the forefront of collaborative restoration – identified overarching objectives from a national vantage point. Nearly 60 people from diverse affiliations pooled knowledge to frame stimulating discussions around the themes of science and action, planning, implementation, monitoring, collaboration and engagement, and the future of collaborative stewardship. The committees received numerous proposals for concurrent session topics and speakers. Ultimately, 105 individuals presented on a panel or moderated discussions. Twenty-six shared research and project posters. The NFF designed this document to capture key themes, lessons, and resources that emerged during the two-day Workshop. We did not attempt to capture every detail. Our objective was to summarize, in an accessible, immediately useful format, the tremendous learning that flowed throughout the Workshop.

    Themes and Highlights

    Participants openly shared ideas about the best and worst of collaborative restoration during the Collaborative Restoration Workshop. In their respective keynote addresses, NFF President Bill Possiel, Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, and USDA Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment Robert Bonnie challenged participants to learn, network, and improve their capacity to advance collaborative restoration. During smaller breakout sessions, participants dove into deep and relevant discussions about collaborative restoration strategies. We were thrilled to see everyone who attended bring the Workshop themes to life through question-and-answer time, hallway exchanges, and conversations over coffee. Throughout the Workshop, participants identified barriers and captured restoration successes, lessons, best practices, and tools. Several overarching themes emerged: Collaboration is the new norm. Through numerous examples, participants illustrated the successes and opportunities stemming from collaboration on NFS lands. The Workshop provided a snapshot of collaboration occurring on and around NFS lands, includin