World Geography 3200/02 6.2 Population Growth Start

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  • Slide 1
  • World Geography 3200/02 6.2 Population Growth Start
  • Slide 2
  • Overview 6.2.1 Compare the terms absolute population growth and population growth rate. (k) 6.2.2 Examine trends in the size and growth rate of the population of a selected region. (a) 6.2.2 Examine trends in the size and growth rate of the population of a selected region. (a) 6.2.3 Given relevant data, classify a country according to the demographic transition model. (a) 6.2.3 Given relevant data, classify a country according to the demographic transition model. (a) 6.2.4 Classify a population growth rate as slow-, moderate-, or fast-growing populations. (a) 6.2.4 Classify a population growth rate as slow-, moderate-, or fast-growing populations. (a) 6.2.5 Relate a countrys rate of population growth to its socio-economic conditions. (a) 6.2.5 Relate a countrys rate of population growth to its socio-economic conditions. (a) 6.2.6 Describe some of the problems that result from overpopulation. (k) 6.2.7 Defend ones views about the efficacy of controlling population growth. (i) 6.2.7 Defend ones views about the efficacy of controlling population growth. (i)
  • Slide 3
  • 6.2.1 Compare the terms absolute population growth and population growth rate. (k) Absolute Population Growth: The actual change in population from one time period to another time period. Main Example: Sweden Population 1981 = 8,300,000 Sweden Population 1971 = 7,978,000 Absolute Population Change is: 8,300,000 - 7,978,000 = +322,000 Example: Sweden Population 1981 = 8,300,000 Sweden Population 1971 = 7,978,000 Absolute Population Change is: 8,300,000 - 7,978,000 = +322,000
  • Slide 4
  • Population Growth Rate: Rate of change in the population. Measured as a ratio of the population change to the original population. Population change x100% =Growth Rate Original Population Main
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  • Annual Growth Rate (AGR): A measure of how fast a population is changing in size. AGR = Population Change X 100% years for change Original Population
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  • AGR = Pop. Change X 100% years for change Original Pop. Mexicos population changed from 49 million to 72 million between the years 1971 & 1981 AGR = 72 - 49 million X 100% 10 years for change 49 million AGR = 4.7% Main
  • Slide 7
  • AGR = Pop. Change X 100% years for change Original Pop. Swedens population changed from 7.9 million to 8.3 million between the years 1971 & 1981 AGR = 8.3 7.9 million X 100% 10 years for change 7.9 million AGR = 0.5% Main
  • Slide 8
  • 6.2.2 Examine trends in the size and growth rate of the population of a selected region. (a) Main RegionPopulation (1990) Population (2010) ChangeAGR North America230 000 000 528 700 000 South America290 000 000 387 500 000 Europe550 000 000 739 200 000 Asia2 500 000 0004 140 000 000 Africa525 000 0001 033 000 000 Australia17 100 000 22 600 000
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  • Main
  • Slide 10
  • There are four distinct stages in the demographic transition model 6.2.3 Given relevant data, classify a country according to the demographic transition model. (a) Main The Demographic Transition Model is a series of line graphs that show how a population has changed over time The Demographic Transition Model is a series of line graphs that show how a population has changed over time It uses changing birth rates and death rates to provide an indicator of economic development It uses changing birth rates and death rates to provide an indicator of economic development The model uses the link between the development of a country and the impact that development has on both birth and death rates. The demographic transition model allows you to infer on a countrys development by looking at birth and death rates
  • Slide 11
  • Stage 1: Pre Modern The population in stage 1 of the demographic transition model is stable There is a high birth rate and a high death rate. This creates a balanced and stable population Areas experiencing stage 1 have low education, low standard of living, low life expectancy Areas experiencing stage 1 have low education, low standard of living, low life expectancy Areas experiencing stage 1 are not developed, and have few services Main
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  • Stage 2: Industrialization and Urbanization Stage 2 of the demographic transition model shows an increase in population The major change is a decrease in the death rate As medical care improves the life expectancy of the people increases Education however does not yet improve so birth rates continue to stay high This creates a population increase Main
  • Slide 13
  • Stage 3: Mature Industrial Stage 3 of the demographic transition model shows a growing population, that is beginning to stabilize The birth rates start to decrease to match the death rate which brings the population under control This is what you would see in countries that have recently become developed nations (China) Main
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  • Stage 4: Post Industrial Stage 4 of the demographic transition model shows a stable population. Birth rates and death rates have stabilized at lower levels The population structure is generally older This can be found in highly developed nations like the United States, Sweden, United Kingdom and Canada Main
  • Slide 15
  • Limitations of the model 1. The model was developed after studying the experiences of countries in Western Europe and North America. Conditions might be different for less economically developed countries (LEDCs) in different parts of the world. 2. The original model doesn't take into account the fact that some countries now have a declining population and a 5th stage. Most texts will now show this stage as it is relevant to an increasing number of more economically developed countries (MEDCs) in the 21st century. Limitations of the model 1. The model was developed after studying the experiences of countries in Western Europe and North America. Conditions might be different for less economically developed countries (LEDCs) in different parts of the world. 2. The original model doesn't take into account the fact that some countries now have a declining population and a 5th stage. Most texts will now show this stage as it is relevant to an increasing number of more economically developed countries (MEDCs) in the 21st century. Main
  • Slide 16
  • 6.2.4 Classify a population growth rate as slow-, moderate-, or fast-growing populations. Main Fast growing: AGR > 2% Moderately growing: AGR approx. = 2% Slow growing: AGR < 2% Fast growing: AGR > 2% Moderately growing: AGR approx. = 2% Slow growing: AGR < 2% Three categories of growth rates. They distinguish among slow, fast and moderately growing populations. Three categories of growth rates. They distinguish among slow, fast and moderately growing populations.
  • Slide 17
  • 6.2.5 Relate a countrys rate of population growth to its socio-economic conditions. (a) Main Population Change Map p. 308 Human Development Index map. The HDI uses life expectancy, education and income indices to determine the level of development in a region.
  • Slide 18
  • 6.2.6 Describe some of the problems that result from overpopulation. (k) Main Fig. 18.9 p. 309
  • Slide 19
  • 6.2.7 Defend ones views about the efficacy of controlling population growth. (i) More money = better education = better jobs = financial restraints = How so? need for contraception = population control. More money = better education = better jobs = financial restraints = How so? need for contraception = population control. Main
  • Slide 20
  • Population Control Legislation by government could make it illegal to have more than a certain number of babies. Is that humane? How do we ensure the correct number. What is done with children over the limit? Some people have proposed that war and famine used to be our natural means of birth control. Is this an option? Legislation by government could make it illegal to have more than a certain number of babies. Is that humane? How do we ensure the correct number. What is done with children over the limit? Some people have proposed that war and famine used to be our natural means of birth control. Is this an option? Main
  • Slide 21
  • Population Control Increasing education of the masses is correlated with decreased births. Could we help to provide education in developing nations? Is that humane? Pension plans & RRSP's allow us to be secure into our old age and we do not have to worry about having children to take care of us. Is this something we could promote in under- developed nations? Increasing education of the masses is correlated with decreased births. Could we help to provide education in developing nations? Is that humane? Pension plans & RRSP's allow us to be secure into our old age and we do not have to worry about having children to take care of us. Is this something we could promote in under- developed nations? Main
  • Slide 22
  • Population Control We know that education of women is correlated with decreased births. Is the education of women something we could promote? Could we provide less expensive birth control for developing nations? What about countries where the state religion forbids the use of contraceptives? We know that education of women is correlated with decreased births. Is the education of women something we could promote? Could we provide less expensive birth control for developing nations? What about countries where the state religion forbids the use of contraceptives? Main
  • Slide 23
  • Population Control Highly developed economies are associated with decreased birth rates. Should we concentrate on supporting improvements to their economies as an ultimate route to controlling birth rates? Highly developed economies are associated with decreased birth rates. Should we concentrate on supporting improvements to their economies as an ultimate route to controlling birth rates? Main