Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and this Medium plan you will be using 2 of the New Music Express Units from the Year 4 book ... Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry 5 WALT: Using beatbox

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  • Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry

    Key Skills to be covered:

    Years 3 and 4 Performing Listening Creating Knowledge and Understanding

    Sing songs, speak chants and rhymes in unison

    and two parts, with clear diction, control of

    pitch, a sense of phrase and musical expression.

    Play tuned and untuned instruments with

    control and rhythmic accuracy.

    Practise, rehearse and present performances

    with an awareness of the audience.

    Listen with attention to a range of high quality

    live and recorded music, to detail and to

    internalise and recall sounds with increasing

    aural memory.

    Experience how the combined musical elements

    of pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre,

    texture and silence can be organised within

    musical structures (for example, ostinato) and

    used to communicate different moods and

    effects.

    Experience how music is produced in different

    ways (for example, through the use of

    different resources, including ICT) and

    described through relevant established and

    invented notations.

    Know how time and place can influence the way

    music is created, performed and heard (for

    example, the effect of occasion and venue).

    Improvise and develop rhythmic and melodic

    material when performing.

    Explore, choose, combine and organise musical

    ideas within musical structures.

    Analyse and compare sounds.

    Explore and explain their own ideas and feelings

    about music using movement, dance, expressive

    language and musical vocabulary.

    Improve their own and others' work in relation

    to its intended effect.

    Use and understand staff and other musical

    notations.

    Develop an understanding of the history of

    music.

    Pitch Duration Dynamics Tempo Timbre Texture Structure

    Determine upwards and

    downwards direction in

    listening, performing and

    moving.

    Recognise and imitate

    melody patterns in echoes.

    Show the overall contour

    of melodies as moving

    upwards, downwards or

    staying the same.

    Determine movement by

    step, by leaps or by

    repeats.

    Perform simple melody

    patterns.

    Indicate the steady beat

    by movement, including

    during a silence.

    Respond to changes in

    the speed of the beat.

    Respond to the strong

    beats whilst singing.

    Use instruments to keep

    a steady beat.

    Hold a beat against

    another part.

    Recognise differences in

    dynamic levels.

    Identify the differences

    between fast and slow

    tempos.

    Identify the tempo of

    music as fast, moderate,

    slow, getting faster or

    getting slower.

    Describe and aurally

    identify the tone colours

    of instruments.

    Compare instrumental

    tone colour.

    Recognise the difference

    between thick (many

    sounds) and thin (few

    sounds) textures.

    Recognise changes in

    texture.

    Identify the melodic line

    in a texture.

    Recognise rhythm on

    rhythm in music.

    Recognise the difference

    between unison (one

    same pitched sound) and

    harmony (various pitched

    sounds at the same

    time).

    Recognise call and

    response form.

    Differentiate between

    the contrasting sections

    of a song.

    Recognise the difference

    between the verse and

    refrain of a song.

    Recognise binary (one

    melody labeled A is

    followed by a new melody

    labeled B = AB melody

    form) and ternary (one

    melody labeled A is

    followed by a new melody

    labeled B which then goes

    back to melody A = ABA

    melody form) form.

  • Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry

    National Curriculum Links: Pupils should be taught to:

    Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression

    Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music

    Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory

    Use and understand staff and other musical notations

    Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians

    Develop an understanding of the history of music

    Cross-curricular links, especially opportunities for Literacy, Numeracy and ICT within teaching: Computing:

    Literacy:

    Writing Opportunities:

    Numeracy:

    Extended Opportunities including possible visits/visitors and local connections: Visits/Visitors:

    Local information:

  • Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry

    Key objectives as

    questions

    Key Skills that can be

    covered

    Possible activities including use of Computing

    and Technology

    Outcomes/Evidence that

    teaching has taken place

    Our composer for this term are: Claude Debussy For this Medium plan you will be using 2 of the New Music Express Units from the Year 4 book (Each is now 3 lessons long)

    The Units covered in this Medium Term Plan are:

    1. Around the world Music focus: Pitch (Link to Geography)

    2. Poetry Music focus: Performance (Link to English)

    1 WALT: Explore the pentatonic scale

    What you will need:

    Tuned percussion (eg chime

    bars, boomwhackers,

    handbells, xylophones etc)

    notes C D E F G A

    Tuned percussion notes C D F

    G A C D

    Key Vocabulary

    Round

    Pentatonic

    Spiritual

    Gospel music

    Harmony

    Graphic notation

    Pitch

    Recognise differences in dynamic

    levels.

    Identify the melodic line in a texture.

    Listen with attention to a range of

    high quality live and recorded music,

    to detail and to internalise and recall

    sounds with increasing aural memory.

    Me Tarzan, you Jane

    Sing an action song as a round following a movie. The children:

    watch a movie to learn an action song;

    perform an action song in two groups as a round.

    Pentatonic melodies

    Listen to pentatonic melodies in songs. The children:

    understand the pentatonic scale;

    listen to pentatonic melodies in songs of different styles.

    Swing low melody

    Follow the pitch shape of a melody with audio and notation. The

    children:

    follow notation of the pitch shape of a melody;

    learn to play a melody from pitch notation;

    combine playing with singing a melody.

    L.A: Practise the Swing low melody without

    the audio means that you can change the

    tempo to suit the needs

    M.A: Children understand what a pentatonic

    scale is and write their own explanation. The

    children learn the swing low melody in small

    groups.

    H.A: Add untuned percussion parts to your

    performance of the song.

    2 WALT: Compose and notating pentatonic melodies

    What you will need:

    Tuned percussion (eg

    xylophone, glockenspiel etc)

    notes C D E F G A C D

    Key Vocabulary

    Pentatonic

    Rhythm

    Tempo

    Improvisation

    Improvise and develop rhythmic and

    melodic material when performing.

    Explore, choose, combine and organise

    musical ideas within musical

    structures.

    Recognise the difference between

    unison (one same pitched sound) and

    harmony (various pitched sounds at

    the same time).

    Pentatonic planet

    Listen to three pentatonic pieces, identifying the country of origin.

    The Children:

    listen to pentatonic music from three parts of the world;

    match three pieces to their country of origin;

    identify and compare musical features of three pentatonic

    pieces.

    Pentatonic improvisations

    Feel the mood of two pieces of music through improvising

    pentatonic melodies. The Children:

    listen to two pieces of music

    improvise their own pentatonic melodies on tuned percussion;

    discuss the mood and style of their improvised pentatonic

    accompaniments melodies.

    LA: it may help some children to place a limit

    on the number of notes when they compose

    the Hex globe pentatonic melody, eg eight.

    M.A: Once they have chosen their note trail,

    they can concentrate on adding rhythm,

    repetition, and deciding on mood.

    H.A: Compose an accompaniment for one of

    the improvised melodies using untuned

    percussion.

  • Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry

    Hex globe note trail

    Compose pentatonic melodies using a note trail. The Children:

    compose pentatonic melodies using a note trail;

    create pentatonic melodies with awareness of the musical

    dimensions and mood;

    perform pentatonic melody compositions with backing audio.

    3 WALT: Playing a pentatonic song with leaps

    What you will need:

    Untuned percussion, eg wood

    block, claves, cowbell

    Tuned percussion notes C D F

    G A

    Key Vocabulary

    Rhythm

    Off-beat

    Use instruments to keep a steady

    beat.

    Hold a beat against another part.

    Show the overall contour of melodies as

    moving upwards, downwards or staying

    the same.

    Determine movement by step, by

    leaps or by repeats.

    Where is the beat?

    Learn to perform off-beat vocal rhythms and identify them in a

    song. The Children:

    learn chanted rhythms and identify them in a song;

    listen with focus to identify off-beat rhythms played on

    different instruments.

    Kwaheri rhythms

    Perform rhythm patterns on untuned percussion to accompany a

    song. The Children:

    play rhythm patterns on untuned percussion;

    sing a song and accompany it with off-beat rhythm patterns.

    Kwaheri melody

    Learn to play the Kwaheri melody on tuned percussion for a

    performance. The Children:

    learn to play a melody line on tuned percussion;

    accompany a song by playing rhythms on untuned percussion

    and the melody on tuned percussion;

    Perform the song to an audience.

    L.A and M.A: TA helps children understand

    off-beat rhythms, divide into two facing

    groups. Group 1 claps the beat, while group 2

    claps the off-beat Kwaheri rhythms. Notice

    where the group 2 rhythm falls between the

    main beats.

    H.A: Practise the percussion and singing parts

    to perform the song Kwaheri independently,

    without an audio track.

    4 WALT: Look at music notation with reference to metre and

    accent

    What you will need

    Untuned percussion, eg

    shakers, drums, tambours

    Key Vocabulary

    Beat

    Rhythm

    Dynamics

    Ostinato/ostinati

    Canon

    Experience how music is produced in

    different ways (for example, through

    the use of different resources,

    including ICT) and described through

    relevant established and invented

    notations.

    Explore and explain their own ideas

    and feelings about music using

    movement, dance, expressive language

    and musical vocabulary

    Use and understand staff and other

    musical notations.

    Hand on the bridge

    Watch the performance of the poem Hand on the bridge. The

    Children:

    watch a movie to learn a poem with actions;

    identify rhythms and dynamics in a performance of a poem.

    Feel the rhythm of time

    Learn an ostinato to accompany the poem. The Children:

    listen to a poem performance and describe the structure;

    learn a rhythmic vocal ostinato using notation, to accompany a

    poem;

    add rhythms to a vocal ostinato on body percussion and

    instruments.

    Hand on the bridge performance

    Perform the poem in canon and add an ostinato accompaniment. The

    Children:

    listen to a poem performance and identify its structure;

    perform a poem in canon to a steady beat;

    accompany a poem with an ostinato that uses voices and

    instruments;

    perform, evaluate and refine.

    L.A: The percussion players should say the

    word rhythms at the same time as playing

    their instrumental ostinato in Feel the rhythm

    of time.

    M.A: Work in groups to make new

    arrangements of the poem. Encourage the

    groups to explore different combinations of

    voices, e.g. solo/group.

    H.A: Encourage them to explore using

    different vocal tone qualities as they did with

    the whispered ostinato.

  • Year 34 A1B Music - Around the World and Poetry

    5 WALT: Using beatbox techniques to imitate the

    sound of a drum kit

    What you will need

    A tambour

    Key Vocabulary

    Tempo

    Beat

    Rhythm

    Identify the differences between

    fast and slow tempos.

    Explore and explain their own ideas

    and feelings about music using

    movement, dance, expressive language

    and musical vocabulary

    Improve their own and others' work

    in relation to its intended effect.

    Write-a-rap rap

    Learn the poem Write-a-rap rap by Tony Mitton. The Children:

    listen to a performance of a poem and identify its structure;

    learn a poem with rhythmic body percussion.

    Beatbox rhythms

    Learn a beatbox accompaniment to a rap. The Children:

    listen and copy vocal beatbox rhythms;

    combine vocal beatbox rhythms in two groups;

    combine body percussion and vocal patterns in two groups.

    Write-a-rap rap performance

    Record a complete performance of Write-a-rap rap. The

    Children:

    organise a performance of a poem with accompanying vocal

    beatbox

    rhythms in groups;

    add body percussion and as an accompaniment between verses

    of a poem;

    record, evaluate and improve the performance.

    L.A and M.A: When chanting the Write-a-rap

    rap rhythmically, it will help the children to

    stand physically close together in a block

    rather than spread out or in long lines.

    Encourage them to listen and be aware of the

    sound of the whole group as they chant.

    H.A: Explore beatbox rhythm accompaniments

    to some of the other strongly rhythmic poems

    the children are learning.

    6 WALT: Perform a poem with rhythmic accuracy (choral

    speaking)

    What you will need

    Untuned percussion

    Vocabulary

    Ostinato/ostinati

    Improve their own and others' work

    in relation to its intended effect.

    Sing songs, speak chants and rhymes

    in unison and two parts, with clear

    diction, control of pitch, a sense of

    phrase and musical expression.

    Play tuned and untuned instruments

    with control and rhythmic accuracy.

    Practise, rehearse and present

    performances with an awareness of

    the audience.

    From a railway carriage

    Read and discuss the poem From a railway carriage. The Children:

    listen to a performance of a poem and discuss the text;

    listen and copy the word rhythms of a poem;

    perform a poem rhythmically to a backing audio.

    Train wheel rhythms

    Learn a vocal ostinato accompaniment to the poem. The Children:

    describe the accompaniment of a poem and identify its

    ostinato;

    read rhythm notation and copy vocal ostinati;

    combine two vocal ostinati in two groups.

    From a railway carriage performance

    Combine the poem and ostinati in a performance. The Children:

    listen to a performance of a poem and count vocal ostinati;

    select untuned percussion instruments to add to the vocal

    ostinato accompaniments;

    perform a poem with vocal and instrumental accompaniment in

    three groups.

    L.A: Practise each groups train wheels

    ostinato separately to make sure they can

    perform in time and with confidence, before

    combining the two groups.

    M.A and H.A: The performance of the poem

    could be further extended by breaking it into

    four stanzas of four lines each, and adding

    two interludes using train-wheel rhythms

    taken from the text (or other patterns

    developed from sounds such as hissing or

    whooshing).

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