Preparing to Teach 2: Learing Outcomes and Assessment

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  • Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars

    Preparing to Teach 2:

    Learning Outcomes

    and Assessment

    May 19 and 20, 2016

    1 sgts.ucsd.edu

    Name Course Dept/School

    Summer I or II # students

    Peter Newbury

  • Scholarly Approach to Teaching

    (backward design[1])

    sgts.ucsd.edu 2

    What should

    students

    learn?

    What are

    students

    learning?

    What instructional

    approaches

    help students

    learn?

    Carl Wieman

    Science Education Initiative

    cwsei.ubc.ca

  • sgts.ucsd.edu 3

    formative & summative assessment

    instructional strategy

    learning outcome

    today

    next week

  • Reminder: How People Learn

    sgts.ucsd.edu 4

  • How People Learn: Key Findings

    1. Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how

    the world works. If their initial understanding is not engaged, they

    may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that are

    taught, or they may learn them for purposes of a test but revert

    to their preconceptions outside the classroom.

    2. To develop competence in an area of inquiry, students must: (a)

    have a deep foundation of factual knowledge, (b) understand facts

    and ideas in the context of a conceptual framework, and (c)

    organize knowledge in ways that facilitate retrieval and

    application.

    3. A metacognitive approach to instruction can help students

    learn to take control of their own learning by defining learning

    goals and monitoring their progress in achieving them.

    sgts.ucsd.edu 5

  • Sort your cards into 3 sets of 3:

    sgts.ucsd.edu 6

    Key Finding

    2

    Implication

    for Teaching

    Implication

    for Teaching

    Implication

    for Teaching

    Designing

    Classroom

    Environments

  • sgts.ucsd.edu 7

  • More than anything else, the best teachers try to

    create a natural critical learning environment:

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    (Bain, p. 99)

  • More than anything else, the best teachers try to

    create a natural critical learning environment:

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    natural because students encounter skills, habits,

    attitudes, and information they are trying to learn

    embedded in questions and tasks they find

    fascinating authentic tasks that arouse curiosity

    and become intrinsically interesting,

    (Bain, p. 99)

  • More than anything else, the best teachers try to

    create a natural critical learning environment:

    sgts.ucsd.edu 10

    natural because students encounter skills, habits,

    attitudes, and information they are trying to learn

    embedded in questions and tasks they find

    fascinating authentic tasks that arouse curiosity

    and become intrinsically interesting,

    critical because students learn to think critically,

    to reason from evidence, to examine the quality of

    their reasoning using a variety of intellectual

    standards, to make improvements while thinking,

    and to ask probing and insightful questions about

    the thinking of other people. (Bain, p. 99)

  • In natural critical learning environments

    sgts.ucsd.edu 11

    students encounter safe yet challenging conditions

    in which they can try, fail, receive feedback, and

    try again without facing a summative evaluation.

    fail receive

    feedback

    (Bain, p. 108)

    try

  • sgts.ucsd.edu 12

    formative & summative assessment

    instructional strategy

    learning outcome

    today

    next week

  • Learning outcomes are valuable to

    the students

    o reveal what the instructor is looking for: no more guessing what understand means or what will be on the exam

    o give preview of the next part of the course

    o allow students to monitor their own progress (metacognition!)

    o allow students to check theyve mastered the concept (especially when studying later)

    sgts.ucsd.edu 13

  • Learning outcomes are valuable to

    the instructor

    o crystallizes what the instructor cares about

    o helps the instructor create assessments

    o helps the instructor select instructional strategies and activities

    sgts.ucsd.edu 14

  • Blooms Taxonomy [2-4]

    sgts.ucsd.edu 15

    transform or combine ideas to create something new think critically about and defend a position

    break down concepts into parts apply comprehension to unfamiliar situations demonstrate understanding of ideas and concepts

    remember and recall factual information

    6 Create

    5 Evaluate

    4 Analyze

    3 Apply

    2 Understand

    1 Remember

  • Blooms Taxonomy [2-4]

    sgts.ucsd.edu 16

    6 Create

    5 Evaluate

    4 Analyze

    3 Apply

    2 Understand

    1 Remember

    higher-order thinking

    lower-order thinking

  • Blooms Taxonomy [2-4]

    sgts.ucsd.edu 17

    6 Create

    5 Evaluate

    4 Analyze

    3 Apply

    2 Understand

    1 Remember

    develop, create, propose, formulate, design, invent

    judge, appraise, recommend, justify, defend, criticize, evaluate

    compare, contrast, categorize, distinguish, identify, infer

    apply, demonstrate, use, compute, solve, predict, construct, modify

    describe, explain, summarize, interpret, illustrate

    define, list, state, label, name, describe

  • Drivers Ed 101:

    Learn to Drive in CA

    sgts.ucsd.edu 18

    What should

    students

    learn?

    What are

    students

    learning?

    What instructional

    approaches

    help students

    learn?

    Carl Wieman

    Science Education Initiative

    cwsei.ubc.ca

    learning

    outcomes assessment

    active

    learning

  • sgts.ucsd.edu 19

    Sample Class C Written Test 5

    California Department of Motor Vehicles

    http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/interactive/tdrive/clc6written.htm

  • You see a flashing yellow traffic light at an upcoming

    intersection. The flashing yellow light means:

    Stop before entering the intersection as long as you can

    do so safely.

    Stop. Yield to all cross traffic before crossing the

    intersection.

    Slow down and cross the intersection carefully.

    sgts.ucsd.edu 20

    Follow the prompts on the colored worksheets

    to work together to write a

    higher-order or lower-order learning outcome

    and matching

    formative or summative assessment.

  • You see a flashing yellow traffic light at an upcoming

    intersection. The flashing yellow light means:

    Stop before entering the intersection as long as you can

    do so safely.

    Stop. Yield to all cross traffic before crossing the

    intersection.

    Slow down and cross the intersection carefully.

    sgts.ucsd.edu 21

    Re-arrange yourselves into groups of 4

    with one person of each color worksheet.

    Take turns sharing your learning outcomes

    and assessments with each other.

  • sgts.ucsd.edu 22

    formative & summative assessment

    instructional strategy

    learning outcome

    Your turn: take ____ minutes to

    1. identify a concept or skill youll be teaching

    2. write a learning outcome

    3. write 2 assessments, one formative and one summative

  • Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-

    level LO

    Course-level LO #4

    Syncing Course-level and Topic-level LOs

    sgts.ucsd.edu 23

    Course-level LO #2

    Course-level LO #3 Course-level

    learning outcome #1

    Topic-level

    LO Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-level

    LO Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-

    level LO

    Topic-

    level LO

    Topic-

    level LO

    Topic-

    level LO Topic-

    level LO

    Topic-

    level LO

    Topic-level

    LO Topic-level

    LO

    Topic-

    level LO

  • Next week: Instructional Strategies

    (especially peer instruction with

    clickers, and think-pair-share)

    Watch the blog

    sgts.ucsd.edu

    for details about what you should do to

    prepare for next weeks meeting.

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  • References

    Learning Outcomes -

    collegeclassroom.ucsd.edu 25

    1. Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design.

    Acsd.

    2. Bloom B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I:

    The Cognitive Domain. New York: David McKay Co Inc.

    3. Adapted from

    edorigami.wikispaces.com/Bloom%27s+Digital+Taxonomy

    4. Revised Blooms Taxonomy

    www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/RevisedBlooms1.html

    5. California DMV Sample Class C Written Test 5

    www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/interactive/tdrive/clc6written.htm

    6. Excerpt from Wieman, C. (2007). Slides from the Wieman Learning

    Goals Workshop. www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/learn_goals.htm

    http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/RevisedBlooms1.htmlhttp://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/interactive/tdrive/clc6written.htmhttp://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/learn_goals.htm