Publication without tears

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    13-Aug-2015

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<ol><li> 1. Publication without tears: tips for aspiring authors Emma Coonan Journal of Information Literacy </li><li> 2. Inside the black box Framing your article On writing </li><li> 3. Have you submitted an article for publication? Do you edit or peer review already? You might enjoy this Scholarly Kitchen article if so. </li><li> 4. Inside the black box Managing editor: Cathie Jackson Book review editor: Ian Hunter </li><li> 5. Relevance to the journals remit Originality and interest to our audience Title and abstract Methodology Use of literature and referencing Clarity of expression and structure Peer review criteria </li><li> 6. Relevance to the journals remit research- or practice-based investigations into information literacy Originality and interest to our audience - useful contribution to knowledge or good practice? Title and abstract appropriate wording and length and informative? Methodology appropriate? rigorous? Use of literature and referencing good analysis of literature? Good referencing or signs of plagiarism? Clarity of expression and structure clear exposition of argument? Logical structure? Spell out acronyms, avoid jargon! Peer review criteria </li><li> 7. Accept for publication without amendment - almost never! Revisions required Major revisions required followed by peer review Resubmit elsewhere Decline submission Reviewer recommendations </li><li> 8. Editor-in-Chief Emma Coonan </li><li> 9. Make a list of all the actions needed of you If you cant meet them, discuss this with the editors Revise the paper and resubmit it If there were comments you didnt address, because you couldnt or because you disagreed with them, say why Remember that addressing these comments may unearth other suggested changes several rounds of revisions may be required What to do with reviewer comments </li><li> 10. Make a list of all the actions needed of you Can you address them? If so, how? If you cant meet them, discuss this with the editors Tell us why (you can take your article elsewhere!) Revise the paper and resubmit it with a covering letter detailing how you have addressed each comment You might also like this Storify. What to do with reviewer comments </li><li> 11. JIL copyeditors Lizzie Seals Sharon Lawler Helen Bader Lisa Hutchins </li><li> 12. JIL Copyeditors advice Use the publication template if there is one Define acronyms and abbreviations on first use Format your references using the journals house style Ensure all in-text citations are given a full reference at the end, and that all references are cited in the text Ensure diagrams and images are copyright-cleared and attributed </li><li> 13. Once it is published Add it to your institutional repository if publisher permits Tell the world - use the DOI where possible </li><li> 14. Framing YOUR article Author: You </li><li> 15. What is a journal article? </li><li> 16. LightgreenLegobrickbyStilfehler,CCBY-SA3.0 You might find this blog post useful too. </li><li> 17. What could you publish? </li><li> 18. What could you publish? Literature review Data Your beloved darlings Think of publishing something from your research, not your thesis </li><li> 19. Framing YOUR article Author: You </li><li> 20. On writing </li><li> 21. Tell your reader Context - youre contributing to a dialogue Approach and method that underpin the research Rigour - the validity of your approach and findings What/why/how of your research </li><li> 22. What/why/how What is your research? Why are you doing it? How are you doing it? </li><li> 23. What/why/how What is your research? What questions does it address (or ask)? Why are you doing it? Why does it matter? What will it change? What interests/frustrates/niggles you about the topic? How are you doing it? Whats your approach or method? How does it frame your findings? How does it help you mitigate bias? </li><li> 24. A bit more on writing </li><li> 25. Keep focused Pin your hypothesis or question and your what/why/how analysis by your desk. Everything you write is directed towards answering the question. Flatpack it Dive in wherever you feel you have something to say. Write up the section which comes most naturally and compile the sections later. </li><li> 26. Its iterative Draft, redraft, draft again (and see Lamott on first drafts!) Find (or bribe) a proofreader This could be a colleague, friend or family member, but always get someone else to read it through! Read critically to help you write critically Become a reviewer or buddy up with another aspiring author and support each other </li><li> 27. Free-writing Dont wait until you know what you want to say get ideas out of your head so you can reflect on and develop them Join (or start) a writers group You can read why I love them in this blog post. Break it down Its like eating an elephant! </li><li> 28. http://patthomson.net/ http://explorationsofstyle.com/ </li><li> 29. Emma Coonan, Editor-in-Chief Journal of Information Literacy e.coonan@uea.ac.uk Twitter: LibGoddess </li></ol>