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Teaching Routines

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Text of Teaching Routines

  • 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. TEACHING ROUTINES

  • LILIAN CECILIA ZAMBRANO
  • EDGAR ALIRIO INSUASTY
  • UNIVERSIDAD DE CALDAS
  • MAESTRIA EN DIDCTICA DEL INGLS
  • METHODOLOGY APPLIED TO AN EFL CONTEXT
  • 2008

19. OUTLINE

  • Types of rules
  • 1.1. General rules
  • 1.2. Specific procedures and routines
  • Teaching procedures and routines
  • 2.1. Making the investment
  • 2.2. Sample procedure
  • 2.3. Establishing standards
  • 2.4. Words have the meaning you give them
  • 2.5. Simplifying rules and routines
  • Classroom chores
  • Structuring communication with parents
  • Conclusion

20. General Rules

  • General rules spell out the teachersoverall expectations for good workandgood behavior within the classroom.
  • General rules deal with broad classes ofbehavior and are best stated in positiverather than negative language.

21. Specific Procedures and routines

  • Specific procedures and routinesspell out exactly how we will do thisandhow we will do that.
  • The only way to make proceduresaffordable is to make them a matter ofroutine.

22. 2. Teaching procedures and routines

  • 2.1. Making the investment
  • Teachers should spend the first two weeks teaching their procedures and routines
  • Students adjust their behavior to match the standards of each teacher
  • Proactive versus reactive management

23.

  • 2.2. A sample procedure
  • until we get it right

24. 2.3. Establishing standards

  • Things that dont work:
  • Nagging
  • Pleading
  • Preaching
  • What does work:
  • Practice
  • Practice
  • Practice to mastery

25.

  • We have seen it demonstrated that you can get what behavior you wantif you work hard enough at it, are tenacious and determined enough, are committed to the idea that it is right and attainable behavior for your students, and are willing to teach them the skills they may need to function at that level
  • (Saphier & Gower, 1987)

26. 2.4. Words have the meaning you give them

  • The word quiet has any fixed meaning until you teach the class exactly what it means in your presence.

27. 2.5. Simplifying rules and routines 28. Classroom chores

  • By doing chores, students learn to take pride in helping out around the classroom.
  • The rule of chores is Never do anything for students that they are thoroughly capable of doing for themselves

29. Structuring communication with parents

  • Structuring communication with parents is crucial. They will either be your allies or your adversaries, depending on the nature of your first contact with them.
  • Sending work home on a regular basis with provision for feedback helps involve parents in proactive problem solving.

30. CONCLUSION

  • Good classroom management leads students to get a clear picture of what is going on and what is expected of them, and allows them to see more clearly the consistent consequences of their own behavior, both desirable and undesirable (Fontana, 1985)

31. REFERENCES

  • Aparicio de Escorcia, Blanca et al. Teachingto learn Learning to teach. London: TVULondon. 1995
  • Jones, Fred.Tools for teaching . Longman.2005
  • Fontana (1985) in Aparicio de EscorciaBlanca et al. COFE Project. Workingdocument No. 5.
  • Saphier, John and Robert Gower. The SkillfulTeacher: Building your teachingg skills. RBT.Massachsetts. 1982