Survive disasters

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  • A L I V E ,

    W E S H A L L T R Y P R O B L E M S O L V I N G

    SURVIVE FROM A DISASTER

    Earthquake.

    Tornado.

    Hurricane.

    Flood.

    Fire.

  • 2

    In 1948, all the worlds governments made a firm

    commitment in the form of Article 3 of the

    Universal Declaration of Human Rights to

    safeguard all peoples rights to life and security.

    But for human rights to have meaning, it is not

    enough for them simply to exist. In the aftermath

    of conflicts and disasters, affected communities

    are all too often left without the assistance

    required to save life and protect livelihoods.

  • 3

    Geneva: India ranks second in the world for

    natural disasters after China, a top UN official

    has said. It was underlined that

    unplanned urbanization and

    failure to address the issue of climate change

    pose a grave threat worldwide.

    The two rapidly growing countries in the world, China

    and India, rank first and second in the number of

    reported natural disasters. While China witnessed 22

    natural disasters, India came second with 16.

  • 4

    A disaster is "a situation or

    event which overwhelms

    local capacity, necessitating

    a request to a national or

    international level of external

    assistance" and "an

    unforeseen and often

    sudden event that causes

    great damage, destruction

    and human suffering."

  • NATURAL DISASTERS:

    PREPARE, MITIGATE, MANAGE

    Disaster preparedness includes all of the activities

    that are carried out prior to the advance notice of a

    catastrophe in order to facilitate the use of available

    resources, relief, and rehabilitation in the best

    possible fashion.

    Disaster preparedness starts at the local community

    level; if local resources were insufficient, it would

    branch out to the national level, and if needed, the

    international level. 5

  • Many governments fail to cope with threats like

    storms, floods and earthquakes.

    They fail to act

    effectively enough in response to these events,

    or

    to take preventative action to reduce

    unnecessary deaths and suffering. A GOVT. CAN BE CHANGED ONCE IN 5 YEARS ONLY!

    6

    Discuss the types of disasters that are most likely to

    happen to U. Explain what to do in each case to your

    own group.

  • 7

    New Initiatives Taken By Government of India

    1. National Disaster Management Framework

    2. Home Secretary Letter to All Chief Secretaries 18.12.2002

    3. Home Secretary Letter to All Chief Secretaries 26.05.2003

    4. Deputy Prime Minister Letter to All Chief Ministers

    29.07.2003

    5. NATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR CAPACITY BUILDING OF

    ENGINEERS IN EARTHQUAKE RISK MANAGEMENT

    6. NATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR CAPACITY BUILDING OF

    ARCHITECTES IN EARTHQUAKE RISK MANAGEMENT

    7. 38 CITIES "URBAN EARTHQUAKE VULNERABILITY

    REDUCTION PROJECT"

  • 8

    The Northridge earthquake occurred on Jan. 17, 1994, in

    Reseda, a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, Calif.,

    and lasted for about 10-20 seconds.

    The quake resulted in more than 60 deaths and more

    than 5,000 injuries. More than 25,000 people were left

    homeless, according to the Federal Emergency

    Management Agency.

    In addition, the earthquake caused an estimated $25

    billion in damage, making it one of the costliest natural

    disasters in the U.S. history.

  • 9

    The Great Hanshin earthquake, or Kobe earthquake,

    occurred on Jan. 17, 1995, in the southern part of Hyogo

    Prefecture, Japan. The focus of the quake was located

    16 km (10 miles) beneath its epicenter, 20 km (12 miles)

    away from the city of Kobe. Measured at 6.8 magnitude,

    the earthquake killed nearly 6,500 people, making it the

    deadliest disaster in the world that year.

    The Kobe quake caused about $100 billion in destruction,

    but Japanese trade rebounded within a year, with

    imports recovering fully and exports back to 85 percent

    of normal levels.

  • 10

    Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season

    was one of the worst disasters in the U.S. history. It

    made landfall along the Gulf Coast on Aug. 25, 2005.

    At least 1,836 people died in the hurricane and in the

    subsequent floods. Five years later, thousands of

    displaced residents in Mississippi and Louisiana were still

    living in temporary accommodations.

    The total damage from Katrina is estimated at $81

    billion (2005 U.S. dollars). It also generated the largest

    single loss in the history of insurance - $41 billion,

    according to the Insurance Information Institute.

  • 11

    The May 12, 2008, Sichuan earthquake was a

    deadly earthquake that measured at 8.0

    magnitude. The quake killed about 70,000

    people and left more than 18,000 missing. The

    epicenter was 80 km (50 miles) west-northwest

    of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province,

    where almost 4 million people resided.

    Estimates put direct damage and losses from

    the earthquake at $29 billion, with indirect

    damage much higher.

  • LOSS OF PEOPLE & $

    12

    About 373 natural disasters killed over 296,800

    people in 2010.

    The estimated costs of natural disasters in 2010,

    in which an earthquake in Haiti killed over

    222,500 people and the Russian heat wave

    caused around 56,000 fatalities, is around $ 110

    billion.

  • 13

    Other than the Haiti earthquake and the heat

    wave in Russia, other major disasters include the

    earthquake in China (estimate number of

    deaths 2,968), floods in Pakistan (1985 deaths),

    landslides in China (1765 people killed) and

    floods in China.

    Floods, drought, earthquake, and extreme

    temperatures are the major sources for rising

    wave natural disasters.

  • 14

    White smokes rises from burning

    houses in Yamadamachi in

    Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan,

    Saturday, March 12, 2011, one day

    after a strong earthquake triggered a devastating

    tsunami in the area. (AP Photo/Kenji Shimizu, The

    Yomiuri Shimbun) The aftermath of the March 11

    earthquake and tsunami in Japan has been

    devastating. Meanwhile, the government struggled to

    contain a nuclear crisis, which added to the country's

    disaster.

  • 15

    So far, 8,649 people dead and another 13,262 missing

    since the 9.0-magnitude quake struck off the coast near

    Sendai, Japan, on March 11, 2011. The damage caused

    by the earthquake and resulting tsunami was enormous.

    Failure of the cooling system at the Fukushima Nuclear

    Power Plant intensified the situation, resulting in

    evacuation of about 200,000 people residing around the

    plant.

    Japan's government had a estimate of $309 billion.

    Estimate could go higher as it does not include losses in

    economic activity from planned power outages.

  • 16

    Indeed, the very actions of

    some governments and their

    national elites

    place marginalised people at risk from disasters by

    discriminating against them, like those who live in

    flimsy slum housing easily destroyed by floods and

    landslips.

    We didnt ask them to be there. God help them.

    Meet your family and discuss why you need

    to prepare for disaster. Explain the dangers of

    fire, severe weather, and earthquakes to

    children. Plan to share responsibilities and work together as a team.

  • 17

    Disaster mitigation

    It is the ongoing effort to lessen the impact

    disasters have on people and property.

    Fewer people and communities would be

    affected by natural disasters with the use of this

    process.

    Because of the varying degree of each natural

    disaster, there are different mitigation strategies

    for each.

  • Even in daunting economic times, the world can

    afford to meet the humanitarian needs of every

    person struggling to survive a disaster.

    It is possible to reduce the threats from climate-

    related catastrophes.

    It is possible for governments to provide good-

    quality aid to their citizens. The governments of

    developing countries must take greater

    responsibility for responding to disasters and

    reducing peoples vulnerability to them. 18

  • NATIONAL POLICY ON DISASTER MANAGEMENT (NPDM)

    INDIA

    India is vulnerable, in varying degrees, to a large

    number of natural as well as man-made

    disasters. 58.6 per cent of the landmass is prone

    to earthquakes of moderate to very high

    intensity; over 40 million hectares (12 per cent of

    land) is prone to floods and river erosion; of the

    7,516 km long coastline, close to 5,700 km is

    prone to cyclones and tsunamis; 68 per cent of

    the cultivable area is vulnerable to drought and

    hilly areas are at risk from landslides and

    avalanches. 19

  • NATIONAL POLICY ON DISASTER MANAGEMENT(NPDM)

    Heightened vulnerabilities to disaster risks_ related to

    expanding population, urbanization and industrialization,

    dev