Archiving for Dummies

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  • These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • by Lawrence C. Miller, CISSP

    ArchivingFOR

    DUMmIESORACLE SPECIAL EDITION

    These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • Archiving For Dummies, Oracle Special Edition

    Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 111 River St. Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774 www.wiley.com

    Copyright 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New JerseyPublished by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New JerseyNo part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the Publisher. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, or online at http://www.wiley.com/go/permissions.Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, A Reference for the Rest of Us!, The Dummies Way, Dummies.com, Making Everything Easier, and related trade dress are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle International Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.

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    For general information on our other products and services, please contact our Business Development Department in the U.S. at 317-572-3205. For details on how to create a custom For Dummies book for your business or organization, contact info@dummies.biz. For information about licensing the For Dummies brand for products or services, contact BrandedRights&Licenses@Wiley.com.ISBN: 978-1-118-28494-0 (pbk); ISBN: 978-1-118-28765-1 (ebk)Manufactured in the United States of America10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

    These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • Contents at a GlanceIntroduction .................................................................. 1

    Chapter 1: Recognizing Todays IT Challenges ...... 3Explosive Data Growth ..................................................4Diverse Data Types and Uses .......................................5Legal and Regulatory Requirements ...........................7Logical and Physical Data Migration ...........................8Rising Costs ....................................................................9

    Chapter 2: Archive 101 .............................................. 11How Does an Archive Differ from a Backup? ............11What Are the Different Types of Archives? ..............15Why Is Tape the Best Archive Media? .......................17

    Chapter 3: Archive Components .............................. 21Archive Software ..........................................................21Tape Software ...............................................................23Tape Libraries ..............................................................26Drives and Media .........................................................31

    Chapter 4: Archive Use Cases ................................. 35Healthcare .....................................................................36Media and Entertainment ...........................................36Telecommunications ...................................................37High-Performance Computing (HPC) ........................38

    Chapter 5: Ten Key Factors to Consider in Implementing Your Archive ..................................... 41

    These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • Publishers AcknowledgmentsWere proud of this book and of the people who worked on it. For details on how to create a custom For Dummies book for your busi-ness or organization, contact info@dummies.biz. For details on licensing the For Dummies brand for products or services, contact BrandedRights&Licenses@Wiley.com.Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:

    Publishing and Editorial for Technology Dummies

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    Senior Project Coordinator: Kristie ReesLayout and Graphics: Lavonne RobertsProofreader: John GreenoughSpecial Help from Oracle: Scott Allen, Doug Chamberlain, Donna Harland, Cindy McCurley, Arthur Pasquinelli, Christine Rogers, Allison Roth, Mark Schaffer, Kerstin Woods

    These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • Introduction

    S ince the beginning of time, mankind has communi-cated written ideas and information with symbols. From the cave paintings of the Paleolithic Age and the hieroglyphs of ancient Egypt, to modern alphabets around the world, information becomes more or less permanent when it is written. All that is required to read these permanent records is the ability to see it and interpret it.Today, enormous amounts of information whether trivial or profound is written and recorded digitally in thousands of different applications and formats at an absolutely stunning pace. Yet, ironically, this digital information is written as symbols (1s and 0s on mag-netic media) that represent other symbols (alphabets, for example) that cannot possibly be seen by human eyes let alone interpreted without the proper tools: computers and their associated software and applications.Managing these vast repositories and archives for our use today is a challenge in and of itself. But what com-puters and technology will exist 50, 100, or even 1,000 years from now to interpret the wealth of information that modern society has amassed? What will be the predominant file format? Will your expensive enter-prise hard disks be unreadable fossils in the next mil-lennia? Or will all of our achievements over the last 50 years be lost to future generations in what Popular Mechanics has called the Digital Ice Age?

    These materials are the copyright of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

  • 2While this book cant answer all of these questions for the ages, it can help you solve your organizations archive and data management challenges today and for at least the foreseeable future!

    About This BookThis book consists of five short chapters, covering todays data archiving challenges, the basics of archives, archive components, use cases, and key fac-tors to consider for your archive solution. Each chap-ter is written as a stand-alone chapter, so feel free to start reading anywhere and skip around throughout the book!

    Icons Used in This BookThroughout this book, we occasionally use icons to call attention to important information that is particularly worth noting. Heres what to expect.

    This icon points out information that may well be worth committing to your nonvolatile memory!

    If youre an insufferable insomniac or vying to be the life of a World of Warcraft party, take note. This icon explains the jargon beneath the jargon.

    Thank you for reading, hope you enjoy the book, please take care of your writers! Seriously, this icon points out helpful sugges-tions and useful nuggets of information.

    These