100 Years of Religious Intolerance in the United States ...nidor Day 2—KKK & Violation # 2, Mormonism

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of 100 Years of Religious Intolerance in the United States ...nidor Day 2—KKK & Violation # 2,...

  • Developed by Mariah Talso Best of Yolo County History-Social Science Symposium Copyright  2008 Regents of the University of California

    1

    100 Years of Religious Intolerance in the United States Developed for the high school classroom by Mariah Talso

    California History Social-Science Standards Addressed Content Standards:

    11.3 Students analyze the role religion played in the founding of America, its lasting moral, social, and political impacts, and issues regarding religious liberty.

    11.3.3. Cite incidences of religious intolerance in the United States (e.g., persecution of Mormons, anti-Catholic sentiment, anti-Semitism).

    11.3.4. Discuss the expanding religious pluralism in the United States and California that resulted from large-scale immigration in the twentieth century.

    11.3.5. Describe the principles of religious liberty found in the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses of the First Amendment, including the debate on the issue of separation of church and state.

    Chronological and Spatial Thinking: 1. Students compare the present with the past, evaluating the consequences of past events and decisions and determining the lessons that were learned.

    2. Students analyze how change happens at different rates at different times; understand that some aspects can change while others remain the same; and understand that change is complicated and affects not only technology and politics but also values and beliefs.

    Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View:

    1. Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations.

    2. Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations. Historical Interpretation:

    3. Students interpret past events and issues within the context in which an event unfolded rather than solely in terms of present-day norms and values.

    Guiding Question

    Why have there been recurring instances of religious intolerance in a country that claims to guarantee religious freedom for all citizens?

    Teaching Thesis

    There have been many instances of religious intolerance in the United States. These instances of religious intolerance have occurred for many reasons. Some of these reasons include: the fear of the unknown, nativism, racism, prejudice, the fear that Catholicism would take over the United States, the fear that Jews would hurt free enterprise in the United States, and the fear that Jews were going to take over the world’s finances. The main goal of this unit is for students to understand that religious intolerance has occurred in the history of the United States and to help students see that this has been a negative point in the history of the United States. Moreover, this

  • Developed by Mariah Talso Best of Yolo County History-Social Science Symposium Copyright  2008 Regents of the University of California

    2

    is an attempt to help students see the fallacy of religious persecution and help students take a stance against religious persecution so that it does not occur in the future.

    Standards Based Objectives for Student Learning

     Students will be able to understand the first amendment and key terms such as: nativism, religious pluralism, religious persecution, anti-Semitism, anti-Catholicism, and anti- Mormonism.

     Students will be able to identify key players and groups, such as: Henry Ford, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Know Nothing Party.

     Students will analyze historical documents and images and discuss the context in which these documents were created and what perspectives they showed.

     Students will discuss why a country that was based on religious freedom has allowed so many instances of religious intolerance to occur throughout its history and even into the present day.

    Materials and Resources

     Students will take notes during a PowerPoint lecture that will re-introduce students to the Ku Klux Klan, the Know Nothing Party, and Henry Ford. The resources for this PowerPoint are:

    o Bunker, Gary and Davis Bitton. The Mormon Graphic Image, 1834-1914. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 1983.

    o “Full Text of the International Jew.” reactor-core.org. 21 June 2007. .

    o Gienapp, William et al., eds. Essays on American Antebellum Politics, 1840-1860. Arlington, TX: University of Texas, 1982.

    o Newton, Michael. The Invisible Empire The Ku Klux Klan in Florida. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2001.

     Students will use the following primary and secondary sources to investigate the main historical research question:

    o "American Platform of Principles." The True American's Almanac and Politician's Manual for 1857. Tisdale, New York: 1857.

    o Barre Gazette. 16 Nov 1838. Barre, Mass., 1838. o Crew, Danny. Ku Klux Klan Sheet Music. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland &

    Company, Inc. Publishers, 2002. o “Full Text of the International Jew.” reactor-core.org. 21 June 2007. . o Fuller, H. “Romanism and Liberty.” The Wide-Awake Gift: A Know-Nothing Token for

    1855. New York: J.C. Derby, 1854. o Gillam, Bernard. Cartoon. 17 Jan 1891. In the Distorted Image 1850-1922. Anti-

    Defamation League of B’Nai B’rith, 1973.

  • Developed by Mariah Talso Best of Yolo County History-Social Science Symposium Copyright  2008 Regents of the University of California

    3

    o Kemmel, Joseph. “Pope Leo XIII, A Physiognomical Study.” The Ungentlemanly Art. New York: MacMillan Company, 1968.

    o Rhode Island Republican. 16 July 1834. Rhode Island, 1834. o Salem Gazette. 24 June 1831. Salem, Mass., 1831. o The Wasp. San Francisco Weekly. 8 Feb 1879. In the Distorted Image 1850-1922. Anti-

    Defamation League of B’Nai B’rith, 1973. o The Wide-Awake Gift: A Know-Nothing Token for 1855. New York: J.C. Derby, 1854.

  • Developed by Mariah Talso Best of Yolo County History-Social Science Symposium Copyright  2008 Regents of the University of California

    4

    Procedure

    Day 1—Introduction to Main Question & Begin Violation # 1 by the Know Nothing Party

     Journal Entry—Students will be given a journal entry to complete at the beginning of class. This journal entry will allow students to recall an instance in their own lives or in the life of a friend or family member where they felt they had been mistreated due to his or her own beliefs. This will lead into a discussion on religious persecution. (10 minutes)

     Lecture—Students will take notes during a PowerPoint Presentation

    on the First Amendment. Students will be introduced to the Know Nothing Party and will learn key terms that will be necessary for understanding the Key Historical Question. Students will be introduced to the Key Historical Question and will begin a quick look at the first violation of religious freedom as done by the Know Nothing Party in the early 1850s. This will include discussion and the examination of several pictures pertaining to religion. (40 minutes)

     Homework—Students will read a portion of the text on the Ku Klux Klan. Depending on the text you use, pick a portion that just gives a brief summary of the foundations or beliefs of the KKK.

    Day 2—KKK & Violation # 2, Mormonism & Violation # 3

     Journal Entry—This journal entry will draw on students reading from the night before. This will begin the day’s discussion on the KKK. (10 minutes)

     Lecture—This lecture will give a brief overview of the beliefs of the KKK and to the groups of people that the KKK persecuted. Moreover, this lecture will also introduce students to Mormonism and to the persecutions that Mormons faced during the 1800s. (40 minutes)

     Homework—Brief reading on Henry Ford and his work with the automobile or a continuation of the KKK or on Mormonism (your choice, I will probably use a reading on Ford and the automobile as this will contrast with his anti-Semitic views we will discuss in class the following day). This really depends on what is covered in the textbook that you are using.

    Day 3—Henry Ford & Violation # 4

     Journal Entry—This journal entry will draw on student’s reading from the night before. This will be a lead in to Henry Ford and his Anti-Semitic beliefs. (10 minutes)

     Lecture—This will be the final lecture of the unit. This lecture will wrap up Violations 1-3, if needed. This lecture will focus on Violation # 4 that of the Dearborn Independent and Henry Ford’s anti-Semitic beliefs. (40 minutes)

  • Developed by Mariah Talso Best of Yolo County History-Social Science Symposium Copyright  2008 Regents of the University of California

    5

     Homework—Review notes from this week. Make sure your notes are legible, as you will need these in class tomorrow. If time, give the instructions or a brief overview of what students will be doing in class for the station activity for the next day.

    Day 4—One class period (either a single period or a double period)

     Station Activity—Students will work in groups of approximately three students. Throughout the activity students will rotate through eight stations. Each station will have instructions and a set of documents for analysis. Students will need to complete an activity at each station. Students will have approximately seven minutes