A PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL WOLF CENTER THE QUARTERLY PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL WOLF CENTER

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  • A Glimpse of How Wolves Solve a Problem, page 4

    The Politics of Wolf Restoration Heat Up, page 8

    A PUBL ICAT ION OF THE INTERNATIONAL WOLF CENTER WINTER 2002

    “Tundra Wolf” by Archie Beaulieu

    Cover.winter 02 10/10/02 2:22 PM Page 2

  • Ready for the ultimate wolf and wildlife adventure trip? AYLMER LAKE • NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, CANADA • AUGUST 2003

    CHECK www.wolf.org FOR MORE INFORMATION

    Due to the generosity of two of our longtime members, we will receive $5,000 to fund our new Wolf Outreach Education Program.

    But there is a catch.

    For every dollar that they give us, we need to raise one of our own.

    Your support will help our Outreach Education Program teach many more people about the essential role the wolf plays in keeping our wilderness wild.

    Please give generously! We can double the impact of every dollar that you give.

    Thank you.

    WE HAVE BEEN CHALLENGED!

    Our Wolf Education Program needs your help.

    Please send your checks or credit card contributions to:

    International Wolf Center Challenge 1396 Highway 169 • Ely, MN USA 55731-8129

    Call 1-800-ELY WOLF or visit our Web site at: www.wolf.org All contributions are tax-deductible.

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    Cover.winter 02 10/10/02 2:23 PM Page 3

  • 2 As a Matter of Fact 3 From the Executive Director

    11 International Wolf Center Notes From Home

    14 Tracking the Pack 15 Book Review 16 Wolves of the World 22 Personal Encounter 25 News and Notes 26 Wild Kids 28 A Look Beyond

    4 A Pack Solves a Problem Observations of wolves in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge provide an exciting look at how wolves interact and solve problems.

    C a t h y C u r b y

    Features

    THE QUARTERLY PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL WOLF CENTER VOLUME 12, NO. 4 WINTER 2002

    On The Cover

    8 Wolves and Western Politics As wolves near federal reclassification, the state of Idaho and counties in California, Oregon and Wyoming have all passed anti-wolf legislation.

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    “Tundra Wolf” by Archie Beaulieu Internationally renowned, Déné artist Archie Beaulieu was born and still lives in the community of Fort Rae, on the shores of Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories. Distributed by Nor-Art International Gallery, P.O. Box 261, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2N2 www.nor-art.com; phone: 867-920-7002; fax: 867-920-7003; toll free: (U.S. and Canada) 1-866-233-4533 Copyright Nor-Art International Gallery To purchase note cards of the cover image, please log on to www.wolf.org and click on Shop.

    IntWolf.winter 02 10/10/02 2:53 PM Page 1

  • Publications Director Mary Ortiz Magazine Coordinator Carissa L.W. Knaack Consulting Editor Mary Keirstead Technical Editor L. David Mech Graphic Designer Tricia Hull

    International Wolf (1089-683X) is published quarterly and copyrighted, 2002, by the International Wolf Center, 3300 Bass Lake Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55429, USA. e-mail: mplspack@wolf.org. All rights reserved.

    Publications agreement no. 1536338

    Membership in the International Wolf Center includes a subscription to International Wolf magazine, free admission to the Center, and discounts on programs and merchandise. • Lone Wolf member- ships are U.S. $30 • Wolf Pack $50 • Wolf Associate $100 • Wolf Sponsor $500 • Alpha Wolf $1000. Canada and other countries, add U.S. $15 per year for airmail postage, $7 for surface postage. Contact the International Wolf Center, 1396 Highway 169, Ely, MN 55731-8129, USA; e-mail: wolfinfo@wolf.org; phone: 1-800-ELY-WOLF

    International Wolf is a forum for airing facts, ideas and attitudes about wolf- related issues. Articles and materials printed in International Wolf do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the International Wolf Center or its board of directors.

    International Wolf welcomes submissions of personal adventures with wolves and wolf photographs (especially black and white). Prior to submission of other types of manuscripts, address queries to Mary Ortiz, publications director.

    International Wolf is printed entirely with soy ink on recycled and recyclable paper (text pages contain 20% post- consumer waste, cover paper contains 10% post-consumer waste). We encourage you to recycle this magazine.

    PHOTOS: Unless otherwise noted, or obvious from the caption or article text, photos are of captive wolves.

    2 W i n t e r 2 0 0 2 w w w . w o l f . o r g

    What year were wolves first reintroduced into Idaho? New Question

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    In the most recent assessment, what is the number of gray wolf subspecies populating North America? There are five subspecies of the gray wolf in North America. The currently recognized subspecies are the Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), the Great Plains or buffalo wolf (Canis lupus nubilus), the Rocky Mountain or Mackenzie Valley wolf (Canis lupus occidentalis), the eastern timber wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), and the arctic wolf (Canis lupus arctos). ■

    CORRECTION The following information was omitted from the credit for the photo on the upper left of page 7 of the Fall 2002 issue of International Wolf: Image courtesy of Matthew and Leann Youngbauer.

    Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi)

    IntWolf.winter 02 10/10/02 2:53 PM Page 2

  • Dispersing to New Territory

    At our flagship interpretive center in Ely, Minnesota, and our Twin Cities office, we at the International Wolf Center have built a strong and impressive base. In 1985 came a cadre of volunteers who conceptualized an educational effort in support of wolves. They lobbied for legislative funding, oversaw construction of the Ely facility, opened it in 1993, and guided the development of a healthy, well-staffed infrastructure. We have a strong educational program supported by management, communications, development, retail and office functions. This heart of the International Wolf Center beats powerfully.

    From this base, the Center is ready to launch a new strategic plan that says the exis- tence of healthy populations of wolves will become one of our important measures of success. We also embrace as part of our mission the concept of wild lands and the importance they hold for successful wolf recovery and its sustainability. It is a revolutionary step, and one that takes us into challenging new territory.

    In the Twin Cities we are searching for a new headquarters to house administrative offices and space to offer education, volunteer opportu- nities and other resources to the public. An outreach educator will join our staff to bring programs to our urban audience.

    In support of wolf populations, we have helped found the Wolf Forum for the Southern Rockies. In this partnership with organizations based in Colorado and New Mexico, the Center will launch an educational

    effort about the potential to recover wolf populations in the Southern Rockies— the “next best hope for wolves.”

    We are moving in these new directions in deliberate steps. An example is our recently formed partnership with retired National Park Service interpreter Norm Bishop, whose efforts in Yellowstone are helping to correct misinformation about wolves in the regional press.

    Clearly this is an exciting, risky and rewarding time for the organization. We are challenged to wisely allocate our resources so that we can grow our base while we take on new outreach efforts. In Ely we will incorporate the importance of wild lands into our educational programs, renew our cornerstone Wolves and Humans exhibit and challenge ourselves to increase visitation and retail support. In the Twin Cities, besides bringing on a new educator, we will continue to take advantage of the finan- cial, media and philanthropic resources concentrated in this area.

    The International Wolf Center stands firmly on the remarkable creativity and commitment of our board of directors and staff. We will rely on them for our foundation as we reach out.

    Our capabilities will be challenged, but we know that in rising to these new opportunities we will meet our mission, build our sustainability and really begin to make a difference to populations of wolves! ■

    From the Executive Director INTERNATIONAL

    WOLF CENTER

    BOARD OF DIRECTORS

    Nancy jo Tubbs Chair

    Dr. L. David Mech Vice Chair

    Dr. Rolf O. Peterson Secretary

    Paul B. Anderson Treasurer

    Dr. Larry D. Anderson

    Thomas T. Dwight

    Nancy Gibson

    Hélène Grimaud

    Cornelia Hutt

    Dr. Robert Laud

    Mike Phillips

    Dr. Robert Ream

    Deborah Reynolds

    Paul Schurke

    Teri Williams

    EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

    Walter M. Medwid

    MISSION

    The International Wolf Center advances the survival

    of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their

    relationship to wild lands and the human role in their future.

    Educational services and informational resources

    are available at:

    1396 Highway 169 Ely, MN 55731-8129, USA

    1-800-ELY-WOLF 1-218-365-4695

    e-mail address: wolfinfo@wolf.org

    Web site: http://www.wolf.org