BAROQUE SPANISH & SPANISH BAROQUE Spanish Baroque Diego Velazquez King Phillip IV of Spain (Fraga Philip),

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  • THE BAROQUE PERIOD

    SPANISH & FLEMISH BAROQUE

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque Francisco de Zurbaran Saint Serapion, 1628.

    Zurbaran was also influenced by Caravaggio and the

    Caravaggistic style.

    Saint Serapion, who participated in the Third Crusade of 1196, was

    martyred while preaching the Gospel to Muslims. According to

    one account of his martyrdom, the monk was tied to a tree, tortured,

    and decapitated. In this work, Zurbaran conveys the fierce

    devotion of Catholic Spain

    In the painting, two tree branches are barely visible in the

    background. The small note on the right identifies him for the viewers.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Diego Velazquez Water Carrier of Seville,

    Wellington Museum, London 1619.

    Created when he was only twenty years old, this masterpiece impressively

    displays the command that Velazquez had for his craft. He rendered he figures

    with clarity and dignity, and his use of tenebrism shows an intense interest in

    Caravaggio’s work.

    The contrast of darks and lights, along with the plebeian nature of the figures,

    reveal the influence of Caravaggio, whose work Velazquez had studied. The artist present this genre scene

    (one from everyday life) with such care and conviction it seems to convey a

    deeper significance.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Diego Velazquez Water Carrier of Seville,

    Wellington Museum, London 1619.

    Created when he was only twenty years old, this masterpiece impressively

    displays the command that Velazquez had for his craft. He rendered he figures

    with clarity and dignity, and his careful depiction of the water jugs in the

    foreground, complete with droplets of water, adds to the scene’s credibility.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Diego Velazquez King Phillip IV of Spain

    (Fraga Philip), 1644.

    Also known as the Fraga Philip, because it was painted in the town of Fraga in Aragon. Such a designation differentiates the many

    royal portraits from one another.

    Philip IV appears as a military leader, arrayed in red and sliver campaign dress. Because the king was not a commanding

    presence and because he had inherited the large Hapsburg jaw (the result of dynastic

    inbreeding), Velazquez had to find creative ways to “ennoble” the monarch. He

    succeeded by focusing attention on the dazzling military regalia while not idealizing

    Philips appearance.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Diego Velazquez King Phillip IV of Spain, 1656.

    SPANISH BAROQUE

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Carlos II (King Philip’s inbred son Charles, with a serious case of the Hapsburg Jaw)

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque The inbred bloodline of the Hapsburgs

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque Diego Velazquez Las Meninas (The Maids of Honor), 1656.

    Velazquez painted his greatest masterpiece, Las Meninas, after he

    returned to Spain. In it, Velazquez showed his mastery of both form and content.

    The painter repreented himself in his studio standing before a large canvas, on which he may be painting this very picture or, perhaps, the portraits of King Philip IV

    and Queen Mariana, whose reflections appear in the mirror on the far wall.

    The young Infanta (princess) Margarita appears in the foreground with her two

    maids-in-waiting, her favorite dwarfs, and a large dog. Velazquez extended the

    pictorial depth of his composition in both directions. The open doorway and its

    ascending staircase lead the eye beyond the artist’s studio, and the mirror device

    and the outward glances of several of the figures incorporate the viewer’s space into

    the picture as well.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    Diego Velazquez detail of the artists, Las Meninas

    (The Maids of Honor) 1656.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque Diego Velazquez, Las Meninas, 1656. SPANISH BAROQUE

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque Pablo Picasso, Las Meninas, 1957.

  • SPANISH BAROQUE

    Spanish Baroque

    An ángel arcabucero (arquebusier angel) is an angel depicted with an arquebus (an early long barrel, muzzle-loaded firearm) instead of the sword traditional for martial angels, dressed in clothing inspired by that of Spanish aristocrats.

    First appearing in Peru (a Spanish colony), these images were widespread throughout the Andes, in places such as La Paz, Bolivia, and as far as present-day Argentina. Representing celestial, aristocratic, and military beings all at once, these angels were created after the first missionising period, as Christian missionary orders persistently sought to terminate the practice of pre-Hispanic religions and enforce Catholicism.

    Master of Calamarca, Archangel with Arquebus (gun), Asiel Tinor Dei. 17th Century CE. Oil on canvas.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens

    Anthony Van Dyck

    Jan Brueghel

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens Self-Portrait, c1623.

    Paul Ruebens a.k.a. Pee Wee Herman

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Raising of the Cross, 1609-1610. FLEMISH BAROQUE The work shows the clear influence of

    Italian Renaissance and Baroque artists such as Caravaggio, Tintoretto, and

    Michelangelo. The central panel illustrates a tension between the multitude of finely muscled men attempting to lift the cross and the seemingly unbearable weight of

    Christ on the cross. Unlike most of his predecessors, note Rubens’ attempt to

    create a scene in which all three panels work together.

    Rubens' foreshortening is evident in the contortions of the struggling, strapping

    men. Christ cuts across the central panel in a diagonal, stylistically akin to

    Caravaggio's Entombment where both descent and ascent are in play at a key

    moment. Motion, space and time are illustrated along with the struggle to upright the cross. Rubens uses dynamic color and

    chiaroscuro boldly, a style that would become more subtle with time.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Raising of the Cross, 1609-1610. FLEMISH BAROQUE

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Decent From the Cross, 1611-1612.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Erection of the Cross, 1609-1610. FLEMISH BAROQUE

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens. St. Sebastian. c.1618.

    Andrea Mantegna, St. Sebastian. c.1480.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Jan Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens. Allegory of Sight (Part of the Five Senses series). c. 1618.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque Peter Paul Rubens, The Judgment of Paris, c1636.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque Peter Paul Rubens, Portrait of Marie d’Medici, 1622.

    The Marie de' Medici Cycle is a series of 21 paintings by Peter Paul Rubens commissioned by Marie de' Medici, wife of Henry IV of France, for the Luxembourg Palace in Paris. Rubens received the commission in the autumn of 1621. Twenty-one of the paintings depict Marie's own struggles and triumphs in life. The remaining three are portraits of herself and her parents. The paintings now hang in the Louvre in Paris.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Marie Arrives At Marseilles, 1622-1625. FLEMISH BAROQUE

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque Peter Paul Rubens, Marie Arrives At Marseilles, 1622-1625.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Peter Paul Rubens, Henry IV Receiving the Portrait of

    Marie d’Medici, 1621-1625.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque Peter Paul Rubens, The Marie d’Medici Cycle, 1622.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque Anthony Van Dyck, Self-Portrait with Sunflower.

  • FLEMISH BAROQUE

    Flemish Baroque

    Anthony Van Dyck, Charles I at the Hunt, 1635.

    The subject of this work is King Charles I of England pictured on one of his countryside

    hunts. Charles was an avid art fan and during his reign he asked various artists, especially those promoting the Counter-

    Reformation, to come and carry out work for him. His love of art was actually the reason

    he accumulated various debts. Anthony van Dyck was Charles' favorite painter and

    settled at his Court after 1630. Here, he’s pictured as an average human being in this work, although his exquisite attire makes it

    clear that he is a gentleman of high esteem and status. This is also proven by his

    teardrop earring which was worn as a sign of being a gentleman during the 17th century. The King wanted to appear

    aristocratic but also show a more human side as he embraces the pastime of hunt