Creating SMART goals for Transition Plans

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Agenda Creating plans What is a SMART goal? Examples and non-examples

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Creating SMART goals for Transition Plans
June Gothberg, Ph.D. Western Michigan University Agenda Creating plans What is a SMART goal? Examples and non-examples The Best Conversations are Data Informed!
How is your State and local district using secondary transition indicator data (i.e. Part B Indicators 1, 2, 13, 14) for decision-making, accountability, and transition program improvement? Read the Indicator 1, 2, 13, & 14 section of your States SPP and APR. Ask for your district data. If you have additional questions ask your State Transition Coordinator for clarification. Contact your State/ Regional Transition Coordinator to get your data for use with your district. Analyze and Interpret Part B Indicator 1, 2, 13, and 14 data Were the proposed district targets met? Was progress made over last years data or was there slippage? To what can you attribute this progress or slippage? What areas need to improve (e.g. transition assessments, graduation, postsecondary education or employment)? What can be done to improve this outcome area? How can goals be measured to determine whether they contributed to improving the outcome? The Best Conversations are Data Informed!
How does your districts data compare to other districts? What patterns can be seen in the data when looking at type of disability, gender, high school exit, and race/ethnicity? Is there an area/school in the District where youth are engaged at higher rates? What do you think contributes to the higher rates in this area? What district policies/procedures may be affecting the graduation, dropout, and engagement outcomes for youth with disabilities? What actions could the school/district to take to improve engagement rates? Prioritize Using a Needs Assessment
What the story behind the data? What is in our power to change? What do we need to focus our priorities on? Make a Goal for Improvement
Create a goal with a 6-months to one-year timeframe. Focus on what the school/district should do over the next year to lay a strong foundation for a priority transition domain area (e.g., transition planning, transition assessment, family involvement, interagency collaboration, systems level infrastructure). Use the SMART technique to write the goal. Make a Goal for Improvement
Specific refers to elements that clearly define what will be done. More specifically, a specific goal answers the questions: who, what, when, where, and how. Measurable, refers to the observable and countable evidence demonstrating the goal accomplished the intended outcome. Achievable refers to the ability to implement the activity within the local constraints (e.g., political climate, resources, and commitment of the LEA, etc.). Results-Focused, refers to a focus on outcomes achieved from the goal as opposed to the process (e.g., counting the number of students who received training on the self-advocacy strategy is process focused; determining whether student can adequately use the strategy to lead their own IEP meetings is results-focused). Goal is Based on identified Need as identified by examining your data. Time-bound, refers to an established timeline in which progress can be measured. SMART Goal Formula using_________________________________.
By __________, the ___________________________ (date) (school/district/agency) will: ________________________________________ (specific action: what, where, how) for ______________of the_______________________ (measure: #, %) (who: students, families, teacher, counselors) using_________________________________. (materials and resources) Sample SMART Goal Are The Goals SMART? Lets Practice SMART Or Not? Students will become more active in the transition planning process. Specific: What will we do to so that students become more active participants in their IEP? Is the goal articulated as a transition outcome, not as an activity, product, or process? Measurable: How will we measure this? Whats our baseline? How many students? How will we measure active participation? What do we anticipate as the change over time? Attainable: Can we do this? Is this reasonable given our resources? What is missing? Results-focused: What is it we are trying to accomplish? What do we want to change in either knowledge, behavior, or condition? Time bound: When will we accomplish this goal? What is the specific month and year? SMART Or Not? To increase the number of youth in Tier 3 from 0-13 for 7th and 8th with appropriate workplace social skills, ABC School will implement Your Future Starts Now, by December 2016. Specific: What will we do to so that students increase social skills? Is the goal articulated as a transition outcome, not as an activity, product, or process? Measurable: How will we measure this? Whats our baseline? How many students? How will we measure active participation? What do we anticipate as the change over time? Attainable: Can we do this? Is this reasonable given our resources? Results-focused: What is it we are trying to accomplish? What do we want to change in either knowledge, behavior, or condition? Time bound: When will we accomplish this goal? What is the specific month and year? SMART Or Not? SMART Or Not? What is missing?
Establishment of a data team charged with collecting data from the ILP, Educational Meetings, and IEP Meetings to improve student transition, instructional practices, and drive the model and programming options across the district. What is missing? What is missing? SMART Or Not? SMART Or Not? What is missing?
By March 2014, to increase students ability to identify interests, strengths, needs, and preferences, from 20% to 100% of special education students in grade seven (7) and eight (8), students and teachers will engage in personal MAPS planning and students will present information at their IEP meeting. What is missing? What is missing? SMART Or Not? How do we Use SMART Goals Now?
Make a plan Develop an action plan Steps for remedying the problem should have adirect link to the data analysis. Any action listed must be specific, observable, and measurable. Sufficient detail is needed so that it is possible to determine when the action has been implemented. Determine what key people should be involved in planning Use your planning tool, to map out how you will carry out your goal. Follow through Evaluate your efforts How do we Use SMART Goals Now? How do we Use SMART Goals Now?
Taxonomy Area/Capacity Building Strategy: Focus: Student focused planning Goal:(S.M.A.R.T.) To increase the number of student-directed IEPsfrom 0 to 10 students, by March 2017, the school will teach youth in 2 resource classrooms (i.e., 30 youth) how to lead their own IEP meetings using the Self Advocacy Strategy. Specific Goal-Related Activities Person Responsible Timeframe (Specific, Observable, Measurable) Provide professional development to two resources teachers on how to use the Self Advocacy Strategy. Allow time for teachers to practice using the curriculum until teachers implement with 100% fidelity. Implement Self-Advocacy Strategy (SAS) in two resource rooms. Assess student knowledge of strategy usingSAS knowledge battery. Allow students to practice directing their IEP meetings in simulated environment. Have students direct IEP meetings. Lorna Dune Principal Bryan Deller, Juanita Frohm November, 2016 December, 2016 January 2017 March, 2017 Outputs/Products Expected Outcomes Potential Indicators Data Sources Agenda, PD materials, PD evaluation SAS curriculum, knowledge battery Fidelity Checklists Practice logs, videos IEP checklists Increased number of students directing their IEP meetings. # of students with a score of 75% or higher on the SAS battery # of students directing their IEP SAS knowledge battery IEP meeting notes Student Developed IEP meeting materials Additional stakeholders and/or TA needs: Professional Development materials for implementing the SAS or expert trainer How do we Use SMART Goals Now? Technical Soundness? Work with your group and apply the Technical Soundness rubric to the sample plan. Select one group member to report out. Thank You! Paula Kohler paula.kohler@wmich.edu
June Gothberg