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  • ED 128 812

    AUTHOR TITLE INSTITUTION PUB DATE NOTE AVAILABLE FROM

    JOURNAL CIT

    EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS

    ABSTRACT

    DOCUBENT RESUME

    CS 202 927

    Donelson, Ken, Ed. Non-Print Media and the Teaching of English. Arizona English Teachers Association, Tempe. Oct 75 168p. National Council of Teachers of English, 1111 Kenyon Road, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Stock No. 33533, $3.50 non-member, $3.15 member) Arizona English Bulletin; v18 n1 Entire Issue October 1975

    MF-$0.83 HC-$8.69 Plus Postage. *Audiovisual Aids; Bibliographies; Censorship;. Classroom Materials; *English Instruction; Film Production; Film Study; Instructional Films; *Mass Media; *Multimedia Instruction; Radio; Secondary Education; Teaching Methods; Television

    The more than 30 articles in this issue of %he "Arizona English Bulletin" focus on various aspects of using nonprint media in the English classroom. Topics include old radio programs as modern American folklore, slide shows, not-so-obvious classroom uses of the tape recorder, the inexpensive media classroom, cassettes in the remedial classroom, censorship, study of television programs, evaluation guidelines for multimedia packages, problems involved in a high school filmmaking program, and student film festivals. Additional material includes a list of 101 short films and a question-answer section on film teaching. (JM)

    *********************************************************************** Documents acquired by ERIC include many informal unpublished

    * materials not available from other sources. ERIC makes every effort * * to obtain the best copy available. Nevertheless, items of marginal * * reproducibility a- lften encountered and this affects the quality * -* of the microfichr hardcopy reproductions ERIC makes available * via the EPIC Docu. ,_, Reproduction Service (EDRS). EDRS is not * responsible for the quality of the original document. Reproductions * * supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original. ***********************************************************************

  • U S DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. EDUCATIONAL WELFARE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF

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    THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRO- DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGIN- ATINS IT POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRE SEN-T OFFICIAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION POSITION OR POLICY

    NON-PRINT MEDIA AND THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH

    Volume 18 Number 1

    1 October 1975

    0 ENG L SH

    A

    2

  • ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN A MEmber of the NCTE Exchange Agreement

    The ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN is a publication of the Arizona English Teachers Association, a non-profit state affiliate of the National Council of Teachers of English. The ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN exists to create effective statewide artic- ulation of English teachers at all levels, to increase awareness of new ideas, programs, and movements in English, and to improve instruction at every level.

    The ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN is published three years each year, in October, Feb- ruary, and April. It is supported and subsidized by the Arizona English Teachers Association, Northern Arizona University, the University of Arizona, and Arizona State University. Membership in the Arizona English Teachers Association (including subscription to the ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN) is $5.50 the year (a three-year mem- bership is available for $15.00). Send application for membership to

    James Reith, AETA Treasurer Scottsdale Education Center 3811 N. 44th St. Phoenix, AZ 85018

    Make checks payable to AETA and include both school and home addresses (making clear to which address the BULLETIN is to be sent). Please include zip codes for both addresses.

    Subscriptions for the ARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN alone are $5.50 for the three issues within the state of Arizona. Subscriptions for addresses outside the state are $7.00 for the three issues. Check for the prices of back issues with the editor since the costs vary considerably from issue to issue. Many of our back issues are now availa- ble from NCTE. Check their yearly catalogue of resources for exact costs. A copy of NCTE's catalogue can be had by writing NCTE, 1111 Kenyon Road, Urbana, Ill. 61801. For subscriptions for the BULLETIN alone, please write

    Ken Donelson, Editor, AEB Englisn Department Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

    Subjects for the 1975-1976 issues: October (Non-Print Media and the English Jlass); February (The Back to the Basics Issue); and April (Adolescent Literature Revisited).

    PERMISS,,L.N TO REPRODUCE THIS COPY RtGHTT:', MATEPAL HAJ BEEN GRANTED BY

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  • IARIZONA ENGLISH BULLETIN"MEI OCTOBER 1975 - NON-PRINT MEDIA AND THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH

    CONTENTS

    Non-Print Media in the English Class: A Rationale Maia Pank Mertz, Ohio State University 1

    How to Teach Film When You're Not Teaching Film Barbara Branam, Apollo High School, Glendale 7

    The Inexpensive Media Clas,sroom Sue Hardesty, Chandler High School 11

    Television and the Bathroom Sink: An Introduction to Synectics Thomas MacLennan, State University of New York at Buffalo 14

    Slide Shows Dorothy Sprungman, Point Loma High School, San Diego, California 20

    Current Trends in Religious Film Making Charles M. Weldon, Arizona State University 24

    The Guy's Got GutE? Jo Augspurger, Hopi School, Scottsdale 34

    Teaching a Media Course in the Reel World Gordon Brossell, Florida State University Charles Suhor, English Supervisor, New Orleans Public Schools Gerri Turbow, Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, Florida 35

    Cassettes in the Remedial Classroom Hortense A. Sarot, Hunter College, New York 41

    Student Movie Making: A Mixed Blessing Elizabeth J. Stapleton, Saguaro High School, Scottsdale 45

    If Money Is a Problem Lynda Goldsen, ASU Graduate Student 49

    Assignment: Study the TV Programs You've Already Seen Gail Fisher Briscoe, Tempe High School 51

    Developing and Implementing Guidelines for Evaluating Multi-Media Packages M. Jean Greenlaw, University of Georgia 54

    Non-Print/Electric Media in the Classroom Patsy Barrett, Sabino High School, Tucson 57

    Technique and the Film Experience: Enlightenment or Overkill? Karla Frandson, ASU Graduate Student 64

    Censorship: A Case Study of the Film, "Walking" Jacqui Goeldner, Boulder Valley High School, Boulder, Colorado 66

    Interweaving Old-Time Radio and Interpersonal Communication Rose A. Nack, Saguaro High School, Scottsdale 74

    A Nasty Little Trick or a Lesson in Not Making Instant Value Judgments Joan Janney, Williams High School 81

    "The Hot L Baltimore" The Analysis of an Tuf:er-Medium Adaptation Richard Drezen, ASU student 83

    101 Short Films: A Basic Film Library 94

    Planning the Instructional Program for Using Media in the Classroom Velez Wilson, New Orleans Public Schools 101

    The Maltese Falcon: Novel into Film Vince flina Lawlor, ASU student 105

    Some Not-So-Obvious Uses for the Tape Recorder in the English Class Dirk Messelaar, College of the Virgin Islands 111

    4

  • Genesis of English Radio and T.V. at Rincon High School Barbara Pinter, Rincon High School, Tucson 114

    The Bicentennial Year: "Old Radio" as Modern American Folklore Margherite LaPota, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Public Schools 119

    You Want to Set Up a High School Film Program--Right? Wrong Saralee Amsden, Westmont High School, Campbell, California 123

    Working With Small Groups and Entertaining the Troops Keith Cunningham, Northern Arizona University 127

    Thou Shalt Not Doodle H. Lynn Blair, ASU Graduate Student 132

    Non-Print Media as "Symbolic Action" Robert J. Mertz, Bowling Green State University 134

    New Questions and Old Answers About Film Teaching 139 Film Festivals: Why and How

    Nel Ward, West High School, Phoenix 143 Classroom Games for English

    John Hollowell, University of Arizona 146 Using Short Films to Teach Personal Narrative

    Deanna M. Gutschow, Whitefish Bay High School, Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin. . . 151 A Dual Vision of Literacy: Possible and Probable Futures of Nonprint Media

    Deborah Dashow Ruth, University of California, Berkeley 156 Shoptalk 13, 23, 33, 44, 48, 50, 53, 65, 73, 80, 82, 93, 110, 113, 118, 122,

    131, 133, 138, 142, 145, 150, 155

    Preface to the Issue NON-PRINT MEDIA AND THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH

    The BULLETIN has had two previous issues on non-print media, "Media and the teaching of English" (Feb. 1970) and "Films and the English Class" (Feb. L971). I do not believe that either issue has dated badly except for the obvious changes in prices from then to nciw and except for the growing sophistication of equipment and teachers in the last five years. This issue is meant to up-date and supplement, not to replace the prior issues.

    As part of a censorship survey last year, I threw in. ona question asking teachers to indicate their feeling about the place and use of non-print media in the English class and the degree of use of non-print media by the teachers. While I was pleased to find almost all the teachers enthusiastic about non-print media, I was intrigued by the warn- ings sounded. Several teachers noted that budget problems held back extensive use, some- times to the distinct detriment of students. ("I've shown only 4 films the first semester. Last week, I was